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TK C9LLEGE- 

SIGNAL 



Bcirvg a. Scmi-morttkly Published 
by the Students •/" the ^€« 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL KL 1 ^ 

Vol. XIII October 8 1902 No ■ 



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CLOTHING 



Our clothing i. appreciated by college ^J^»* **^ The' clrTte 
minute That's why we are Belling .o many of tho.e grey suits these days, in 
The verv newest, the'cut, fit and .tyle are perfect, and satisfaction » guaranteed .n every 
case. Good suits from $10 to $22. 

Raglans and Chesterfields, in the popular Oxford and Cambridge shades, are the favor 
ites in Overcoats. We have also UlsUrs and Reefers. A ll prices up to $35. 

R. K\ ARMSTRONG. 



iy Dress Suits to rent. 



EF Agent for Young's Hats. 



J. F. CAMPION, 

•FASHIONABLE TAILOR.* 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 
MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTY. 

ty AH suits made in my own work-shops, .jg 

HUNT'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS 



THE ELITE SHOE 



■ AT 



PAGE'S STORE. 



A PULL LINE OF 



EAZOES! 



Razor Strops, 

Shaving Mirrors, 

Shaving Brushes, 

Shaving Soap, 
Witch Hazel, Bay Rum, 

Cigars, Cigarettes and Tobacco. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 

It's your own fault if you don't get your money's 
worth here. We right every wrong. 

Next to Post Office. 
Wedding and Engagement Rings 



In approved forms. 
PRICES RIGHT. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELER 



BENNETT 



COLLEGE 

JEWELER 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

43-BYK8 FITTED FRKE-» 
Uy a graduate of the American Optical toll.-*. 



DEUEL'S DRUC STORE, 

Aherst House Block . 




I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 



OOLLABSAND OUPPS, 

HARRY CLARK. 

COLLEGE OTJTPITTER, 

UNDER THE HOTEL. 



the: college signal 



VOL. XIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 8. 1902. 



NO. 1 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
««..*«,..«! Alumni .re reauested to contribute Communications should be addressed. College Signal. Amherst. Mass. The Siohal will be 
JSTS^^ Subscriber, who do no, receive their paper regularly .re requested to 

notify the Business Manager. , ■ 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903. Editor-in-Chief. 
WILLIAM ETHERINCTON ALLEN, 1903, Business Manager. 
HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. 1904. Assistant Business Manager. 

NE.L FRANCS MONAHAN. 1903. Co.lege Notes. ily^^Km^T^iD^^A^ 

RICHARD HENDR1E ROBERTSON. 1903. FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN, 1904, Athletics. 

R RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1 904. Department Notes. ARTHUR LEE PECK. 1 904. Intercalate. 

CEORCE HOWARD ALLEN. .905 * HERBERT HAROLD COODENOUCH. .905. 



Term., ti.OO par year In adeance. Single Copies. 10c. Poataga outside of United Statea and Canada, 86c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Readir.g-Room Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W, E. Tottingham, Pres. Athletic Association, 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. Base- Ball Association. 

C. P. Halllgan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

R. H. Robertson, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
J. G. Cook, Manager. 
A. L. Peck. Manager. 
H. L. Knight. Pres. 



Entered ai second-class matter, Post Offlca at Amherst. 



£drt&ri&.s. 



At a mass meeting held some time since, a mem- 
ber of the College senate read certain rules pertain- 
ing to customs in vogue at this Institution. In plac- 
ing these rules before the students the senate takes a 
peculiar stand. The senate was organized to act In 
harmony with the students and In so doing to use its 
offices in bringing about such reforms and perpetuat- 
ing such customs as might be of obvious good to the 
College. It has no power to enforce. It has only the 
right to suggest and advise. Its strength lies In its 
co-operation with popular sentiment. If popular sen- 
timent in the first place sanctions such rules as the 
senate promulgates, then it Is the manifest duty of the 
students to see that such rules are enforced. If Col- 
lege sentiment upholds the time honored custom of 
saluting the members of the faculty then let it be 
seen to that every member of the faculty is saluted 
with proper respect. If the student body sanctions 
the action of the freshmen saluting the seniors let the 
custom be carried out. If freshmen are not to smoke 



on the College grounds until after some interclass vic- 
tory why should individual offenses be tolerated ? 
Just so long as popular expression backs the senate, 
just so long will the senate act in the full capacity for 
which it was originated. If such a state of circum- 
stances cannot exist then let the senate retire In a 
body and give way to some other scheme by whl^h 
proper esprit de corps may be maintained as Its Im- 
portance justifies. 



We have been asked by outsiders, if our football 
games last fall with Amherst and Tufts had resulted 
in victories for opponents would a mistake have been 
made in the records of Spaulding's Football Guide. The 
facts of the case are that under the Amherst game 
our score reads 0-0 while under the Tufts' records we 
are not mentioned. We can see no reason to doubt 
that the scores of the respective teams were sent In 
correctly by their managers in the first place, for we 
believe our opponents honorable enough to send in 
correct reports be they of victory or defeat and, sec- 
ondly, as it would only work to their own discredit to 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






have discrepancies appear in the Guide. There cer- 
tainly seems to be no excuse for tampering with the 
records. It is unfortunate both for Amherst and 
Tufts that the errors should have been made as many 
will be led to believe that their managers trans- 
gressed the rules of true sportsmanship. 



The college year of 1903 is with us! With it have 
come a number of alterations about College which 
are worthy of note. The central heating station and 
new boarding-house which at commencement had 
hardly passed the embryo state are at the present 
writing fast nearing completion. The entering class 
although not so large as might have been expected 
bids fair to furnish a large quota of valuable men. 
Football material is fairly abundant as well as talent 
which will be of service in other college organizations. 
Three graduates of the Conn. Agri'l college have en- 
tered the senior class and two ladies have taken ad- 
vantage of the new two years' course recently opened 
for women. The chair of horticulture made vacant 
by Professor Maynard has been filled by Prof. Waugh 
of the University of Vermont. In re-arranging the 
course of horticulture he has made it possible for stu- 
dents to more systematically pursue individual lines 
of research and has organized a seminar which will 
without doubt prove of great value to the class. In- 
stractor Herrick of the department of modern lan- 
guages comes to us with a thorough knowledge of his 
subject. Mr. Herrick has organized a class in Span- 
ish the value of which is obvious to those who Intend 
to take up various lines of work in the new posses- 
sions. Professor Lull who has spent the past sum- 
mer in Montana in behalf of the American Museum, 
has returned to Columbia university for a year's grad- 
uate work, leaving his classes in charge of Prof. 
Loomis of Amherst college. The graduate courses 
of the College are being pursued by five members of 
our alumni, four of whom are taking Entomology as 
their major study. Mr. Knight of last year's gradu- 
ating class has returned to assist Prof. Wellington in 
the Chemical department while D. N. West of 1902 
will instruct in Mathematics and drawing. 



The flag rush at Amherst on Sept. 20 was very 
tame. The Sophomores protected their flag with 
little effort. 



A GENTLEMAN'S HONOR. 

•• Horoay for Old Glory." shouted Harry Stillman 
as he ran from the drill hall to where his friend Guy 
Grey was standing. This was the way in which nearly 
all the students at West Point hailed the outbreak of 
the war. 

Stillman was a native of Connecticut and his friend 
Grey's home was in Virginia. It was now their 
senior year and they had begun to hope for good 
appointments when the cloud of war settled down 
over the country. 

At first, the ill-feeling between the two parties did 
not effect Stillman and his friend but it was not long 
before a change could be felt if not perceived. 

This day, however, in which President Lincoln's 
call for 75,000 volunteers so elated Harry Stillman, 
caused Grey to show his true colors " Of course 
you're going to enlist," said Stillman as he ran up to 
Grey with the news. '« No, I'm not. Why should 
I ? " snapped Grey. This answer rather put a damper 
on Stillman's enthusiasm but as soon as he joined 
some of his class from the north, his spirits arose 
again. 

Guy was silent at supper and kept out of the way 
during the evening. What was the surprise of every 
one next morning to find that Guy had left for home 
late the evening before. That same day, Stillman 
and some of his chums received appointments to the 
different regiments forming in their own states. 

Everything was hurry and bustle for the next few 
weeks. Harry hurried home and went to work drill- 
ing his company. In the latter part of May. Stillman 
marched at the head of his company to the train and 
arrived at Washington two days later. 

The government held the troops here for a little 
while before they went to join the army of the 
Potomac. Harry drilled his men all the time they 
were in Washington and by the time he marched 
south his company was the best drilled body in camp. 
Our company was detailed to guard duty as soon 
as they were installed In the army. Now everybody 
knows guard duty in the enemy's country is not the 
easiest thing in the world. Company K of the — th 
Connecticut was a new organization and the men were 
unaccustomed to military duty. We ought not to 
have been surprised then to hear many false alarms 
and challenges ring out during the night. 



On one dark stormy night, just before a battle, more 
challenges were heard than usual. Harry went out to 
speak to his men and try to quiet them. The sentl- 
Inels drawn from Co. K had been stationed along the 
Itop of a bluff. At the foot of this bluff a swift, muddy 
Ibrook hurried along between the two armies. Still- 
Iman reached his men after a good deal of wandering 
[and succeeded in putting them more at ease. 

He soon found himself at the extreme left of the 

sline of sentinels and in the ravine which lay between 

f the two armies. If he could make his way up this 

%ully he could save himself a long tramp. Of course 

he had to go silently for there was cause for fear on 

both banks. If he should make the least noise, it 

Jyould draw the fire of both friend and foe. 

Silently, cautiously, he crept along the brook 
between the two lines. Once in a while a musket 
%ould crack out and a slight jar could be felt as the 
ball struck the ground. Harry had began to congrat- 
ulate himself on his safe journey when he heard just 
the least sound straight ahead. 

He stopped, he listened, he put his ear to the ground, 
and came to the conclusion that, whatever kind of an 
animal it might be, it was going the same way he was. 
So he kept his distance and followed. 

Very soon the animal reached an opening in the 
glen. He stopped here and gave Harry a chance to 
get a good look at him. It was as he suspected. 
There stood a Confederate spy. Clearly, it was the 
;Union officer's duty to prevent his return to the 
enemy. So when the spy started around in back of 
our lines. Harry followed him with the intention of 
capturing him as soon as possible. 

The two men soon reached a dark clump of trees. 
H> Here Is my chance." thought Harry, as the Confed- 
erate stopped and seated himself on a log. A quick 
rush behind him and the spy felt the barrel of a Colt 
pressed against his temple. " One word and you are 
a dead man." whispered Harry Stillman. The man 
gave in without a struggle and allowed our friend to 
bind him. " Now march," commanded Harry, " and 
If you value your life, march silently." " What are 
you going to do with me?" whined the prisoner. " My 
IGod !" muttered Harry as the spy spoke. " Why are 
:you in this garb ? Grey. I never thought we should 
teee you a rebel. And now I've got to take you to the 



dear old college is doing. Oh ! that I hadn't discov- 
ered you." 

This man whom he had followed all through the 
ravine was the student that left West Point the night 
after Lincoln's call for volunteers. And now he was 
the captured spy behind Union lines. Quick to take 
advantage of our officer's surprise and sorrow, he 
went so far as to say, " Harry, It will surely appear a 
disgrace to the old college if you take me to head 
quarters. Let me go now. No one will ever know 
that we have met each other." He saw that this 
plea would not work so he said, " Old boy. you know 
we have been fast friends. We were called each 
others shadows. If you take me in, they will give 
me the regular punishment for being a spy. Have 
mercy on my mother and sisters if not on me. For 
the love of God and friendship give me my liberty." 

■• No, Grey. In the name of all that 1 hold sacred 
and dear, I cannot let you go. 1 am in honor bound 
to serve my country. Would 1 be doing so if I 
released you? I cannot, i will not let you go." 

Grey tried several other ways among which was 

bribery, but all to no avail. Just before they left the 

woods for the guard house Harry said, »■ Remember, 

Grey, that I have done this because my honor demands 

it. I have no personal feeling of hatred but my 

whole soul is given up to the preservation of the Union 

and the whole Confederate army could not force me 

to be false to my holy trust and duty. Goodbye." 

He held out his hand and clasped the hand of his 

once esteemed friend. This was all done In the woods 

near the guard house. Harry marched his prisoner 

to the guard, gave his evidence in a straight forward 

manner and left his old friend, yet enemy, never to 

see him again in this world. 



OUR FIRST MOOSE HUNT. 

It was the autumn preceding my entrance to col- 
lege that the following adventure took place. I had 
always prided myself as being a sort of nimrod and 
the desire to hunt big game had been constantly 
growing in me since the days when I had shot my 
first partridge with a single barreled gun. 

An almost constant companion from my early boy- 
hood had been a certain Jim Winslow ; together we 
had spent our vacations in camping and pursuing such 
sports as the season would allow but fortune had 



AsL 1° 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









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never favored us in being able to bag larger game 
than a raccoon. Now however we were to take a 
month's shooting in Southern New Brunswick. It 
was early in the season when we packed our rather 
extensive equipage and embarked on a coaster (or the 
Bay of Fundy. Landing at Kingston we transferred 
our baggage to a river steamer and continued up the 
St. Johns river as far as the little backwoods town of 
Woodstock. There we landed and began to look 
about for a guide. After some search we obtained a 
French Canadian who bore the rather typical name 
of Pierre to act as cook, canoeman, guide and gen- 
eral helper. 

Early the next morning we three embarked in his 
Indian canoe and paddled up the stream. At night 
we camped in the heavy pine timber which bordered 
the river on both sides. Proceeding the next morn- 
ing at daylight we made rapid progress and at noon 
entered a series of small lakes. It was a beautiful 
place ; from all sides the heavy wooded hills extended 
away as far as the eye could reach making with the 
many tints of early autumn a scene of unexcelled 

grandure. 

It was on the bank of one of these lakes that we 
made our permanent camp. Moose were reputed to 
be plentiful in the region and as it was still early we 
expected them to be fairly easy to approach. It was 
with no little eagerness that we pitched our tent and 
unpacked our supplies. The following forenoon we 
would visit some large meadows to the northward 
where the animals were wont to feed and there take 
our first lesson in stalking, providing game was to be 
found. However, after a rather belated midday meal 
Jim and myself took our marlins and strolled along 
the bank while Pierre busied himself around camp. 
We had proceeded perhaps half a mile when our 
progress was impeded by a dense cedar swamp which 
led back from the lake, following a small stream, and 
finally lost itself among the hills to the westward. 

Into this thick undergrowth we pressed our way 
thinking perhaps we might bag a brace of white hares 
which we knew to be plentiful. Suddenly from out a 
clump of wild apple trees crashed some heavy animal. 
We did not catch sight of it but as it went smashing 
away through the underbrush our minds turned in- 
stinctively to moose. 

It was not difficult to follow the tracks through the 



soft soil and we made our way swiftly In the direction 
in which the animal had taken. All at once Jim. 
who was leading the way, stopped and raising his rifle 
fired. His shot was followed by a bellow and our 
game crashed on out of the swamp and into the 
heavy Umber which skirted it. Evidently Jim's shot 
had taken effect, for on the leaves there were fre- 
quent spots of blood which enabled us to continue the 
chase. For nearly two hours we tramped onward, 
every now and then stopping to listen and peering with 
caution into every clump of bushes expecting at any 
moment to see a huge moose emerge in a desperate 
charge. We now began to skirt around the base of a 
heavily wooded mountain and suddenly a wide fertile 
valley was opened to our view. Several houses could 
be seen and corn fields with the corn already in the 
shock spread out in the distance. The spots of blood 
and occasional hoof marks led directly towards the 
nearest farmyard. " Mighty queer acting moose, 
that," suggested Jim, " but I've heard of wild animals 
doing funny things when they are cornered and I'll bet 
that critter is hit a trifle hard." As we neared the 
farm buildings we began to have grave suspicions that 
our claims on the moose were not so valid, after all. 
We were met by an irrate old native who show- 
ered numerous epithets upon our heads and bad us 
follow him. He led the way to a corner of the farm- 
yard where a brlndle heifer lay stone dead with a bul- 
let hole through her body. 

Straying away from the rest of a herd she had lived 
long enough of Jim's fatal shot to reach the protec- 
tion of her home. 

Fortunately we had enough ready money to satisfy 
the rather exorbitant demands of the owner, and as 
we wended our gloomy way back to camp we re- 
solved to know in the future at what we were shooting. 



NOTICE. 



The Signal offers a cash prize of five dollars for 
the best story, criticism or scientific essay received 
before Jan. 1 , 1903. All contributions must be of not 
less than seven hundred or more than one "thousand 
words in length and are restricted to undergraduate 
students of this college. Contributions for this prize 
will not count towards the eligibility of students for 
places on the Signal Board and all competitors should 
state plainly whether or not the matter is to be 
entered in the contest for the above prize or for places 
on the Board. 



Obs?r0at!or\s^C onc,u S lon S 



Once more the observer is back at his desk. Yes 
he has had a pleasant time this vacation, thank you, 
and is glad to get back and take another lap in his 
brilliant future. After all it's nice to return to college 
after such a protracted recess. Before commence- 
ment the observer had sundry enchanting visions of the 
vacation to come : to his mind came thoughts of ideal 
days and soft moonlight nights, of grand sunsets, of the 
fragrant sea breezes, and of the delightful coolness of 
the hills. He saw in his minds eye many a speckled 
beauty rise from the rushing torrent to flash at his fly 
and he felt himself lying for hours under the shady 
, trees perusing the latest novels. But somehow fortune 
I smiled not upon him and so it came to pass that while 
'busily holding down a ten dollar a week job he has 
during the past three months gone through a serious 
mental process. He becam,e convinced that his past 
career had not been up to an ideal high standard. 
| Somehow he cannot forget the slanders and discrepan- 
cies of the last year especially. Perhaps he has not 
taken part in some of the more outlandish doings to 
which his fellow students are addicted but perhaps such 
little things as fireing into a company of cadets with 
gallery catridges or eating grapes which he should have 
known came from the "vineyard" may have caused a 
bad moral effect on his associates. For these and 
many like offenses he is truly sorry and furthermore he 
is resolved to turn over a new leaf. For instance he 
is resolved to study harder in the future, especially on 
physics— may be the character of his future surround- 
ings depends on that one thing alone. Again he is to 
abstain from flirting with the " co-eds ". It may have 
a bad moral effect upon them. His visits to Hamp 
are to be moderated. His mustache is not to be 
allowed to grow and he will abstain from sending home 
for money on a postal card. He will not impose upon 
freshmen by selling them worn out uniforms for fifteen 
dollars apiece ; true his stock of uniforms is sold out 
but that's not the idea ; It has a bad moral effect on 
the freshmen. And lastly he is to restrain from carv- 
ing his name and sundry other important titles on the 
desks during lectures. After being called before 
Prexy six times In succession and paying $9 60 for 
repairs he has become convinced that it has a bad 



moral effect and as he said before will desist from like 
actions in the future. It is with great pleasure that the 
Observer finds himself able to place these words before 
his fellow students especially the more easily influenced 
underclassmen and he would heartily say to them. 
"Go thou and do likewise." 



Y. M. C. A. RECEPTION. 

On the evening of Friday, September 26, the annual 
reception to the Freshmen class was given by the 
college Y. M. C. A. Owin^ to the steady storm of the 
day and the threatening sky In the evening the town's 
people were not strongly represented. Several of the 
faculty and a fair proportion of the upper-classmen 
turned out in good number. The reception opened at 
8 p. m. After a social hour the president of the associa- 
tion called upon professors Mills and Howard for 
speeches which should benefit especially the freshmen. 
Prof. Mills spoke from the point of view of a member 
of the faculty, while Prof. Howard presented the view 
of an alumnus in regard to the nature and benefits of 
the work of the association. Prof. Mills showed very 
clearly the position of the Y. M. C. A. as a college 
organization which being composed of men interested 
in other college organizations should demand the atten- 
tion of other men In those organizations. Prof. 
Howard then pointed out from experience in this and 
other associations the pleasure and inspiration to be 
derived from active membership and the need in every- 
day life of men trained by such membership. Both 
presentations were heartily applauded by those present, 
among whom, we are pleased to state, were several 
alumni. Soon after the speeches refreshments con- 
sisting of ice-cream and cake were served. The 
gathering then broke up after two hours of profit and 
pleasure. Thus ended the first college social event of 
the year. 

CALENDAR. 

Oct. 8. Football game with Dartmouth at Hanover. 

Oct. 9. Y. M. C. A. meeting at 7 p. m. 

Oct. 15. Seminar held by Horticultural class at 
7.45 p. m. 

Oct. 16. Regular meeting of Y. M. C. A. Topic. 
Secret of Endurance. 

Oct. 18. Football game with Wesleyan at Middle- 
town 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



rf 









1906. 

Following are given the names and addresses of the 
entering closs : Chester D. Abbott, Andover ; Roland 
A. Bacon, Leominister; Robert P.Brydon. Lancaster ; 
Charles W. Carpenter. Monson ; William W. Colton, 
Pittsfield : George H. Chapman, New Britain, Conn.; 
Edward R. Bowles, Deerfield ; Harry C. Daniels. 
Amherst ; Allen D. Farrar, Amherst ; Frank A. Farren, 
Peabody ; George F. French, Tewksbury ; Sameul C. 
Foster, Boston : Edwin F. Gaskill, Hopedale ; Afton 
Smith Hayward, Amherst ; Archie A. Hartford, West- 
field ; Addison T. Hastings, Jr., Natick ; Elber W. 
Hersem. Westboro ; Clarence E. Wood, Mills; Zack 
T. Huburt, Pride, Ga.; Earl W. Keith, North Easton ; 
Francis W. Kewick, Millers Falls ; Joseph M. Mark- 
ham, Ayer : James E. Marlin, Brockton ; Stanley 
F. Morse, Watertown ; Louis H. Moseley, Glaston- 
bury, Conn.; Everett P. Mudge, Swampscott ; Ralph 
W. Peakes, Newtonville ; Austin W. Phelon, Gran- 
ville ; Arthur A. Racicot, Lowell ; Stanley A. Rogers. 
Boston; Henry M. Russell, Bridgebort.Conn.; Herbert 
O. Russell. North Hadley; Edwin H. Scott. Cam- 
bridge ; Alonzo H. Shannon, Worcester ; George W. 
Sleeper, Swampscott ; Henry W. Sloper, Pittsfield ; 
F. Y. Spurr, Melrose Highlands ; Fred O. Stevens, 
Amherst ; Benjamin Strain, Mt. Carnell, Conn.; 
Herman A. Sulke. Leominister : Patrick F. Sullivan, 
Amherst ; William O. Taft. East Pepperell ; Willard 
C. Tannatt, Jr., Dorchester; Charles A. Terrill, Plain- 
field; Fred A. Watkins, Hinsdale; Vernon O. 
White. Attleboro ; Alex, H. M. Wood, Easton j Her- 
bert P. Wood, Hopedale. 



FOOTBALL. 

The football season opens auspiciously this fall. 
The majority of last year's winning team are back 
at College and several new candidates are being 
tried out. Patch, Franklin, Craighead, Captain Hal- 
ligan and Snell who made up the rush line last sea- 
son are all in the game, and barring accident, ought 
to retain their respective positions. A good man. 
however, if he could be developed, would give Patch, 
who does not seem to have pulled into his last year's 
form, a close rub. Cardner is expected back in the 
game shortly and will be heard from later. Whita- 
ker and Lewis, last year's half-backs are working 



hard ; but Connelly, who last year captained Boston 
English High's championship team, is a better man 
than either of them ; and is likely to push one of 
them to the side lines. Bowen must also be taken 
into consideration. Munson and Walsh were having 
a pretty tussle for the full-back position, with no de- 
cided advantage either way until the latter was forced 
to lay to with a bad ankle. Since that time, Munson 
has taken things more easily, and must wake up de- 
cidedly if he expects to retain the place throughout 
the season. Jones is also showing up well, his hurd- 
ling being especially good at times. O'Hearn wit! 
probably retain his position at left end. and for the cor- 
responding position at the other end of the line there 
are several candidates. Ahearn, last year's quarter- 
back, and Proulx, who made his " M " last year at 
the end position are the most likely men. Shannon 
and Suhlkeof the freshman class, being tried out for 
place. The two most promising candidates for quar- 
ter are Quigley, '04, and Kennedy. '06. Quigley is 
a good man on defensive work, but is a little slow In 
starting the scrimmage. Kennedy passes the ball 
well, but seems to lack the snap and dash necessary 
to hold the full confidence of the team. 

Altogether with the advantage of Coach Jenning's 
presence from the beginning of the season, a team as 
good as last year.s ought to be developed, Too 
much, however, must not be expected. The team is 
weak in substitutes for the line. In case of accident, 
there is no one to be counted on to take the place of 
either Snell or Halligan. And the team as a whole 
hasn't seemed to get into the game with that " do or 
die" spirit that was responsible for so many of last sea- 
son's victories. The Dartmouth game to-day is the 
first test of its real strength. 

Massachusetts vs. Holy Cross, 0-0. 
Massachusetts played her first game at Worcester 
against the Holy Cross eleven Saturday, Sept. 27. in 
a drizzling rain, and though neither team scored, the 
visitors showed themselves greatly superior to their 
opponents in every department of the game, except 
perhaps the use of the lower jaw. Massachusetts had 
the ball in their possession more than three-fourths of 
the time. Indeed Holy Cross made their distance 
only once during the game, and it was only the slow 
field and frequent delays, that saved Holy Cross from 



jing scored against at least once in each half. The 
ioly Cross men were frequently penalized for offside 
play and for holding, and probably deserved much 
lore punishment of that kind than they received, 
^or Massachusetts, Snell and Halligan gained the 
nost ground while Quigley showed up well on the de- 
rence. For Holy Cross, Skelley is the man who de- 
serves mention. The line-up: 

'roulx, r.e. i.e.. Stankard 

Snell. r. t. »■ »•• Carnev 

•ranklin. r. g. '• B- Ki "g 

3 atch, c. c - O'Boyle 

>aighead. 1. g. r - B- Folev 

ialligan. I. t. r - '•■ Cambell 

>Hearn. 1. e. r - e - O'Connor 

Quigley. q. 1- Larkin 

Ewis. r. h. •• h - skelle y 

fhitaker. 1. h. r - h ■• Re E»n 

lunson. f. f - Reed 

Referee and umpire— Rocheleau and J. Halligan alter- 
»ted. Linesmen— Bowen for Mass. and Beaudreau for 
kr Holy Cross. Time-keepers— Allen for Mass. and Mercer 
>r Holy Cross. Time— Two 15 minute halves. 

Massachusetts, 30, Boston College 0. 
Tue game with Boston college last Saturday looked 
|retty from the side-lines to a supporter of the 
maroon and white." but as a matter of fact the 
lame was not one of which we can boast particularly. 
Boston college sent up a very weak team both on the 
Offensive and defensive. The fact that they came so 
■ear scoring a touchdown in the second half only goes 
jo show how weak was Massachusetts when the ball 
Was in possession of their opponents. The offensive 
trork was better as is shown by the fact that the home 
team retained possession of the ball throughout the 
entire second half. 

After the first kick-off, Boston was immediately 
held for downs, and Snell was quickly sent over for a 
touchdown. O'Hearn made the second touchdown in 
quick order. For the rest of the half, however. Mas- 
sachusetts played ragged ball. A fumble gave the 
ball to Boston who brought It back to Massachusett's 
40- yard line. Here the home team held and Boston 
was forced to kick, but regained the ball on Massa- 
chusetts' seven yard line. Boston fumbled, however, 
tnd there was time for only one more scrimmage 
yhen time was called for the end of the first half. 

During the second half, Massachusetts carried the 
ball down the field almost at will and succeeded In 



making a touchdown for every five minutes of play. 
Halligan kicked all field goals. The line-up : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Ahearn, 1. e. 
Halligan, (capt.) 1. t. 
Craighead. 1. g. 
Patch, c. 
Franklin, r. g. 
Snell. r. t. 

O'Hearn, Proulx, r. e. 
Connelly, 1. h. b. 
Lewis, r. h. b. 
Munson, f. b. 
Quigley. q. b. 

Score — Massachusetts 30. 



BOSTON COLLEGE. 

r. e.. Sweeney 

r. t., Whalen 

r. g., Crowley 

c, Tenney 

1. g., Cramer 

1. t. Fitzpatrick 

1. e.. Sullivan, (capt.) 

r. h. b.. Rondina 

1. h. b., Rulley 

f. b.. Hernngton 

q. b., Tenlin 

ion College 0. Touch- 



downs— Snell 2. Halligan. Conelly. O'Hearn. Goals from 
touchdown— Halligan 5. Umpire— Smith. Referee— Mc- 
Cusker. Linesmen— Walsh for Massachusetts and Green 
for Boston College. Time— 20 and 15 minute halves. 



College N°*«- 



—Football ! I 

— C. A. Tinker has left college. 

H. L. Barnes is attending recitations with 1905. 

The faculty have excused the football men from 

drill. 

W. E. Allen has been appointed college organist 

for the year. 

—The Freshmen are working hard at the setting 
up exercises. 

A number of students went to Hanover with 

the team to-day. 

— F. D. Couden has been appointed assistant in the 
Zoological Museum. 

J. A. Hubert of Atlanta. Ga., Is taking a special 

course In agriculture. 

— H E. Hodgkiss, '02, is taking a post-graduate 
course In this college. 

— H. L. Knight has been given a fellowship in the 
department of Chemistry. 

Rodgers. White and Chapman of the freshman 

class have entered the band. 

Professor Howard has volunteered to lead the 

choir during the coming year. 

— The Amherst game has bsen changed from the 
1 5th to the 8th of November. 






w 



TT 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 















—The college band furnished music for the Bel- 
chertown cattleshow yesterday 

— H. J. Franklin will report college news for the 
Springfield Republican this year. 

—Professor Howard has taken the junior Chemis- 
try class in place of Dr. Wellington. 

—Professor Brooks is acting president during Presi- 
dent Goodell's absence from college. 

— F. F. Henshaw has been appointed second as- 
sistant of the college weather department. 

—Prof. Petit is organizing a beginners dancing 
class which is to be instructed in the drill hall. 

—Oct. 18 is open day to all students, free golf at 
Country club. Match game same day with Hamp 
den County Golf team. 

—The battalion has adopted the regulation U. S. 
army cap for its use during the coming year. The 
commissioned officers will also wear shoulder straps 
instead of gold chevrons. 

—Owing to the increased demand for men who 
can speak Spanish, the college has seen fit to intro- 
duce that language as an elective. Mr. Herrick. in- 
structor in French, is now in charge of the class. 

—It was voted at a mass meeting recently that a 
tax of $3.50 should be levied on the student body for 
the support of the football team and a sum of $1.75 
per man was also voted for the maintenance of the 
college reading room. 

—The Freshmen— Sophomore rush came off on 
the evening of Sept. 18. In spite of the heavy rain 
the two classes showed that their spirits had not been 
dampened in the least. The rush was declared a 
victory for the class of 1905. 

D. Lunt Cleaves, who has for some time been 

connected with the chemical department of Hatch 
Experiment Station will be married to Miss Flora 
Eloira Henry, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Henry, at the bride's home in Lenox Wednesday 
evening. Oct. 15. at 7-00 o'clock. 

—The following class officers have recently been 
elected: 1904— President. F. D. Couden ; vice-pres- 
ident. C. H. Griffin; secretary and treasurer, J. W. 
Gregg ; historian. R. R. Raymoth ; basketball captain. 
E. S. Fulton ; class captain, R. A. Quigley. 1905— 
President, Bertram Tupper ; vice-president, G. W. 



Patch; secretary, J. F. Lyman; treasurer, Thomas 
Hunt ; football captain, E. T. Ladd ; rope-pull captain, 
J, J. Gardner; sergeant-at-arms, H. B. Filer. 



Dep&rtm*n4T flotgs. 



LIBRARY. 
The following new books have been placed In the 
library during the summer : 
Thoreau — "The Service." 
Hencler & Pond— " Chemistry of the Terpene." 
Bunge— ' ' Textbook of Physiological and Pathological 

Chemistry." 
Hobert— " Practical Toxicology." 
Hunter—" Elementary Studies In Insect Life." 
Orne Sarah Jewett— " The Tory Lover." 
Prof. Elliot and others—" Animal Experimentation." 
Roudani— " Genera 'talica Ordlnis Dipterorum." 

7 vols. 
Bachmetzew— " Experimentelle Entomologlache Stu- 

dien." 
j em ple_" History of North Brookfield, Mass." 
Hughes—" The Making of the Citizens." 
Corey — " History of Maiden." 
Hancock—" Life at West Point." 
Ketcham— " Pennsylvania State College." Illustrated. 
Bell—" Power Distribution for Electric Railroads." 
Nageli— " Mechanic's Physiological Theory of Organ 

Evolution." 
Jordan—" Animal Farms." 
French — " Animal activities." 

HORTICULTURE. 
The horticultural department begins the year under 
a new management. Professor Waugh, formerly of 
the University of Vermont at Burlington, and a grad- 
uate of Cornell University is now head of the depart- 
ment. Professor Waugh comes to us with a good 
reputation behind him and already a decided brace is 
noticeable In the department which he superintends. 

Before the fall semester opened, the following out- 
line of horticultural work for the different classes was 
sent to the undergraduates of the college. It gives 
something of an idea of the intended work during the 
coming year : — 

Course I. The fundamental operations of horti- 
culture—propagation, pruning and cultivation— as 




related to the physiology of the plant. Sophomore 
class ; second semester ; required. 

Course 2. A provisional course, for this year only. 
The first half will be given to systematic pomology— 
the description, nomenclature and classification of 
fruits. This will be a thorough study in taxonomy 
according to the principles involved in systematic 
botany, zoology, and classificatory science generally. 
The second half of the course will be devoted to fruit 
marketing, and will consider markets, the relation of 
cost of production to price and to profit, the law of 
supply and demand, fruit packages, methods of mar- 
keting, advertising, storage, transportation, etc. The 
work in systematic pomology will be by lectures and 
laboratory exercises; Junior class; first semester; 
required. May be elected by students who wish to 
specialize in horticulture. 

Course 3. Landscape gardening. Junior class ; 
second semester ; required. Elective to others. 

Course 4. Evolution as related to plant culture. 
A thorough examination of the principal theories of 
evolution, of heredity, and of variation ; and the appli- 
cation of these theories to the breeding and cultivation 
of plants. All seniors electing horticulture will be 
asked to follow this course, though other work in hor- 
ticulture may be taken simultaneously If circumstances 
permit. First semester only. 

Course 5. Individual problems will be assigned to 
seniors who elect horticulture during the second 
semester. 

Courses in floriculture, gardening under glass, or In 
reenhouse construction and management may pos- 
Ibly be offered this year, but cannot be definitely 
nnounced at this time. 

A seminar will be formed for all students taking 
dvanced work In the department of horticulture. 

CHEMISTRY. 

Professor Howard is instructing the Junior class 
this year instead of Dr. Wellington. 

ZOOLOGY. 

Professor Lull, during the summer has been pros- 

jecting in the West for skeletal remains of extinct 

inimals. He is now taking a post-graduate course in 

Columbia university. In his absence Dr. Loomls of 

unherst college Is instructing in zoology. 



ENTOMOLOGY. 

Three men have been employed during the summer 
in connection with the work of the entomological lab- 
oratory. Their work has consisted chiefly in Inspect- 
ing for scale insects, inflating caterpillars, collecting, 
working out life histories and describing different 
stages. The orchard which was so thoroughly sprayed 
and fumigated last spring Is found to be still more or 
less infested with the San Jose scale Insects in various 
parts. It is very evident, however, that the spring's 
spraying did much good. Fumigation with hydro- 
cyanic acid gas seems to have been the most effect- 
ive treatment. 

An attempt has been made to Introduce (Mantis 
religosa) Into this region from Rochester. It Is 
feared that the attempt was unsuccessful, many 
difficulties having presented themselves. Most 
of the eggs received from Rochester were sterile 
and those mantids which did hatch from the eggs 
proved to be just as hungry for one another as they 
were for other insects. Some egg masses were 
placed around in different places on the college farm, 
however, and the effort may yet prove successsul. 

Dr. Fernald, who is state nursery Inspector for 
Massachusetts, has appointed E. A. Back as deputy 
nursery inspector. Most of the nurseries which they 
have so far inspected have been more or less Infested 
with San Jose. 

There are five graduate students In this department 
this year. Mr. Morrill. '00. Is working on the Hemlp- 
teron genus Aleyrodes. Mr. Ballou, '95, on the 
Sphecidae or Thread- Waisted Wasps, Mr. Billings. 
'95. on the Pompilidae or Spider Wasps, Mr. West. 
'02, on the Heteroptera. and Mr. Hodgkiss, '02, on 
the Scale Insects. 

MATHEMATICS. 
Professor Hasbrouck has divided the Freshman 
class Into two divisions. Mr. D. N. West, 02, has 
been appointed instructor In mathematics and the two 
Freshman divisions alternate under Professor Has- 
btouck and Mr. West. This is the first year that this 
scheme has been tried. It seems necessary on 
account of the size of the class. 



The celebration of Blood Monday at Harvard on 
Sept. 29th proved to be a very tame affair. 




1 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Alumni. 



Ex-72.— Frederick A. Ober has an article on 
•• Martinique " in the August Munsey. 

•83.— Homer J. Wheeler is President of the asso- 
ciation of Official Agricultural Chemists. 

•90 _C H Jones is the Referee on Phosphonc 
Acid 'for the Association of Official Agricultural 
Chemists, and Henri D. Haskms is Associate Referee 

on Potash. 

•90._Frederick Jason Smith of the Bowker Fer- 
tilizer company was in town recently. 

•90 -Charles H. Jones, Chief of the Vermont 
Experiment Station spent his vacation in town. 

•92 -Edward B. Holland is Associate Referee 
on Nitrogen for the Association of Agricultural 

Chemists. 

-92 -The nuptials of M iss Lillian Smith of North 
Amherst and Edward B. Holland took place Sept. 10. 
at the home of the bride. It was a very pretty home 
wedding but few guests being present. The couple 
happened in Montreal on their honeymoon. 



Spring Clothes. 



ju«t Um s«»its that young dm will awwetai*. 

There's a collection here U.al absolutely cannot 
be fOBDd elsewhere iu WcsUtu New Kn-lnntl. 
Will you coiue and sec It! 

HATS. PTORNISHINOS. SHOW. 

Haynes & Co., 

A Iways Reliable. 



SroiKoriKLD, 



Mass. 





PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 

New York 

Central 

Lines 



DAILY SERVICI 



through coaches I EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 



BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 

SLEEPING CARS 

DINING CARS 



TO AMD FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER, 

AS FOLLOWS 



It KAD DOWN. 

st.m; a.m. Ml r.M. 
Mt " Mi " 

10.00 " «-f>8 " 
10.W) " 8.01 " 
11.. SO " H.03 " 



It. Amherst 
»r. Palmer 
It. Palmer 



BKAI> it. 
nr.it.06 A.M. 8.3*; p.m. 

It. Ml " Ml " 

ar.7.36 " 7.3<i " 



To ALBANY, 


9 Trains 


To BUFFALO, 


8 Trains 


To CHICAGO, 


7 Trains 


To CINCINNATI, 


3 Trains 


To DETROIT, 


5 Trains 


To ST. LOUIS, 


3 Trains 


Through the 





Famous 



nr. Worcester tT.MI " 



ar. Boston 



lv. ft.OO " 



0.10 

VB0 



BerksDirc 
Bills . . . 

AND TIIK 

fllbanp Gatcuw, 

Which i« always Open. 



For further information, time tabl 



es, etc., call on ticket agent* or atldrcw, A. 8. HANSON, OF. A.. Boston, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



II 



Physician and Surgeon, 
Railway Postal Clerk, 10 



'93. — Eugene Hugo Lehnert and Eva May Akin 
were married Aug. 27. at Montreal, Quebec. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lehnert will be at home at Storrs. Conn., 
after Oct. 1. 

'93. — Joseph Baker, Farmer. Riverside Farm, 
New Boston, Conn. 

•93. — Fred. G. Bartlett, Sexton of Cemetery, Cor- 
Cabot and Sycamore Sts., Holyoke. 

'93. — Henry D. Clark, veterinarian, 15 Central 
St., Fitchburg. 

'93. — George F. Curley 
10 Congress St., Milford. 

'93. — Herbert C. Davis 
lighland Ave.. Atlanta, Ga. 

'93. — Charles A. Goodrich, Physician and Surgeon, 
5 Haynes St., Hartford. Conn. 

'93. — Francis T. Harlow, Farmer, Box 106, 
larshfield. 

t 

'93. — Harry J. Harlow, Farmer, Shrewsbury. 
'93. — Ernest A. Hawkes, Evangelist, 4:h and Broad 
Us., Richmond. Va. 

'93. — Frank H. Henderson. Civil Engineer. 43 
ishland St.. Maiden. 

'93. — Edwin C. Howard, Principal Centre Gram- 
lar School. 55 Kensington Ave., Northampton 

'93. — Franklin S. Hoyt, Assistant Superintendent 

Grammar Schools. Indianapolis. Ind. 

'96. — Short course. — E. W. Capen received the 
:gree of M. D. from Boston University School of 
lediclne on the 4th of June. He will probably take 
>me post-graduate work before locating permanently. 



THE IDEAL 



mnch, Billiard, Hair Dressing 



AND 




MANICURING ROOMS. 



ook's Block, 



up on* fl I k>> ( - 



Postal Cards and Stamps at cost. 

Cigars and Tobacco to burn. 

Gentlemen you are always welcome. 



DWIGHT W. THTTRBER, Prop'r. 



TSheHEIR 

to the FARM 



*.« 



i/ 



Will make the old (arm pay 
If he (arms the (arm la the 
modern way. 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

& aught by Malt. 

A thorough and practical course, 
under the direct charge of Wm. P. 
Brooks, Ph. D., (Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College). Our course is 
based on "Brooks' Agriculture;" It 
treats o( soils, plants, tillage, drain- 
age, irrigation, manures, fertilization, 
crop rotation and everything per- 
taining to money-making on the 
farm. Test books (3 volumes. MOO 
pages, 300 illustrations) (roe to stu- 
dents. Send (or 36 page book de- 
scribing course In full. 

Home 

Correspondence 

Schools, 

SpringfUU, Ma* J. 

Other Course: Business, Shorthand, 
Penmanship, Typt'wrltlnir. Normal 
course fits for teacher's oarfinoato. 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGEU, 

200 Broadway, New York. 

Club and College lMns and Kings. 
Gold and Silver Medals. 
IMhimmimIx, Watches, Jewelry. 



"UP TO THE MINUTE" 



IN 



MEN S FINE SHOES. 



The Northampton Shoe Co., 



88 Main St.. 



Noil I HAMPTON, MA8H. 



\ 















THE COLLEGE 



SIGNAL 



Kellogg were married on i A large audience 

GraC e V^^^^jSi decorated 
was present. The ^rch $ The 

wlt h hot house p ants ^J™ a y David Sprague . 

ceremony was *«« m **J'™\ recept ion at the 
Following the ceremony the -s^ P ^^ 

house o( the br.de s parents ^ 

St. Mrs. Kellogg was grad iat«T ^ ^ 

New England Conservatory of Music ai d 

.Mrs Kellogg will reside at Kingston. R. 1. 
and Mrs • Ke " 0gg has one more ye ar o 

•00,-Y. H. Can0 . olumbia university School 
«. tudv yet to pursue at the uoium 
^Me'dicJ was about college recently 

. ,_Max Shaffrath boo^eper f Charley 
Alden. wholesale and retail drugg.-ts. 
South Springfield. 



50 YEARS* 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
- rpffffi^ Copyrights *c. 

Anr one Kin. a *«&^$&CZ*?Z 

J S8fcl6SSm. l 
^ThT boyden, 



XIII. 




THE: COLLEGE, SIGNAL 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 22. 1902. 



NO. 2 



IOBCKBAM, FRUIT> coNFE °- 
TIONERY. 

„■»«., urn*". • 



AMIIKUST. MAS> 
NO. 1 COOK'S ULOCK. 

•ure Drugs and Medicines, 

immiu l'M'KS, K1SIIINU TACKIV 

i. .«— 2s sr:£25E 

, w eat ol chBW'a mock- 



*^ KlMlOl'BAN l'LAN. 

•1 no anil ill>Wlir ilB '. Wll" ■' 
First Class Liiucu. ■* ( Bath, »3.W>- 

,« M/m«n St., «l»J'-« Te , cpllon ,, |M4. 

Nrlir 0B1Q* Ht»I 
iSPKlNOKIKUU, ■' 

_ •!«■ i»roi»riftor. 
HKNHY E. MAKML » r "» 



int to all subscribers until its discontinuance .s ordered and arrears pa ^ ^ 

Ufy the Business Manager. , " ~~ 

~ BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903. Editor-in-Chief. 
WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN. 1903. Business Manager. 

HOWARD MORGAN WH.TE, 1904. ^-'-^^J^JSlS'pR ANKLIN, .903, A.umn. Notes. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903. College Notes. FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904. Athletics. 

RICHARD HENDR1E ROBERTSON, 1903. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904, Interco'legiate. 

R RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904. Department Notes. HERBERT HAROLD GOODENOUGH. 1905. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905. 



T^maT^.O O per gear in adcance. Single Copies, ioc 



Postage outside of United Stutes and Cunada, g6c. extra. 



. C. A. 

Ball Association, 
:ge Boarding Club, 
idlng-Room Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottingham. Pres. Athletic Association 

p. W. Brooks, Manager. 
C. P. Halligan, Sec. 
R. H. Robertson, Sec. 



Base-Ball Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
J. G. Cook, Manager. 
A. L. Peck, Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst, 



Ed i-to rials. 



ooolbt's hotel; 

V HBNKV B. MARSH. Pro,., 

RKSTA mtANT <» T..K KVKOPKAN P..A> 



Now that the new boarding-house is nearing com- 
Mtion the question enters our minds— What is to be 
It» name? Surely it would be a pity for such a tine 
building to go under the hackneyed name of " hash 
house." As yet we have heard no suggestions in re- 
gard to the matter but it would seem to be worthy of 
consideration. Again would it not be desirable to 
place a piano at some prominent point in the main 
hall so that at convenient times the students could 
gather around and rehearse College songs? The 
most undesirable feature of the old boarding hall has 
been its unhomelike atmosphere. Its rather repulsive 
Interior has caused the students to leave as soon after 
meals as possible. The new building with its high, 
well lighted halls should give a feeling of satisfaction 
and comfort to those who enter it. 



«ince the spring of 1901 this College has been with- 
out a club or organization, outside of the fraternities, 



by which the art of public speaking could be pro- 
moted. Two years ago saw the Forensic club in a 
flourishing condition and exerting a marked influence 
over the College. The meetings of the club were 
well attended and enthusiasm ran high. That the 
club should be allowed to drop into obscurity is a sad 
mistake. In the English department the practice of 
debating Is not extensive and our men graduate with- 
out becoming at all proficient in this most valuable 
accomplishment. It Is evident that something should 
be done in this College to rekindle the interest in de- 
bating. Should we be content to send athletic teams 
alone to compete with other colleges ? There Is no 
reason why the honor of Massachusetts cannot be up- 
held as well upon the stage as upon the gridiron and 
at the same time an interest could be enthused into 
the student body which would react for the material 
good of the College. 

The fact that our football management saw fit not 
to play Yale when a game was asked for by her has 
caused some disappointment among the students and 



M 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»5 









alumni. Nevertheless there seems to have been am- 
ple reason for the management to take the stand it 
did. Our squad is obviously much too small to un- 
dertake such a game in the midst of a season, At such 
a time the retirement of our best players would seri- 
ously handicap us and make us unable to cope with 
colleges which are nearer of our own class. Although 
it is obvious that a good showing against Yale would 
advertize us in no small way. Yet we have still 
plenty of formidable material with which to try con- 
clusions. Every team upon our schedule is backed 
by from three to five times as many men and by much 
greater financial support than is ours. It would seem 
then that our team is being asked to do all that the 
circumstances under which we labor would warrant. 
The telegram from New Haven so soon followed by 
the report of the Dartmouth game, however, could not 
but create a sense of satisfaction in the minds of 
those connected with the College. 



Since College opened there has been no little com- 
ment upon the possible increase of work required by 
the military department. Some of the rumors which 
have reached our ears have been startling in the ex- 
treme and upon investigation we find that the problem 
which confronts the College is no small one. In the 
general orders No. 94, Issued from the Adjutant 
General's office, Aug. 9th, 1902, we find that for mil- 
itary colleges of the second class, comprising those 
colleges established under the provisions of the act of 
Congress of July 2, 1863 and which are required to 
include military tactics in their curriculum, there shall 
be practical and theoretical courses which shall com- 
prise infantry, drill regulation, guards and outposts, 
marches, target practice, instruction in first aid to the 
injured together with various lectures and special 
duties. Besides this " A guard shall be mounted five 
times (weather permitting) in each week of the Col- 
lege year and the guard shall be practically instructed 
for one hour In the posting and relief of sentinels and 
their duties." Captain Anderson estimates that about 
thirty hours per week will be need to conform with 
these requirements. At present the orders are being 
reconsidered by the War department and pending 
further Instructions, the students at this College will 
be required to take no more work in the military de- 
partment than formally. 



Few people realize. with what implicit confidence 
the students of a college often accord all power and 
and right of expression to the editors of the college 
paper. Into their hands is given the unquestionable 
right to express with the greatest minuteness the var- 
ious trend of popular sentiment. Matters rhetorical, 
social and political are alike submitted to their care and 
judgment. From their minds must come the thoughts 
which form the literature of the College and from 
their pens the facts which would make the paper an 
authority in local matters. The editors of such a 
paper may have reason to feel proud of the great com- 
pliment paid them but at the same time we cannot 
but envy those men who stand at the head of a col- 
lege paper which is published by the student body. 
The College Sicnal is supposed to be published by 
the students of this College and not by the editorial 
board of the paper. Their duty is to compile, correct 
and to have the general oversight and management of 
the paper. We would then ask for your hearty co- 
operation in the publication of the College Signal. 
Let us have your views, your comments, the products 
of your literary talent. Do not place all confidence 
in the editorial board of a paper which you help to 
support financially and which represents your interests. 



A TALE IN CAMP. 

•• Well, yes, I do remember one amusing experi- 
ence." 

I was lying on the bunk, upon the sweetest kind of 
a bed that Mother Nature provides, fir boughs, and a 
foot deep. We had just returned from a successful 
strike. The deer had been cleaned and strung on 
the bough. We had gathered In a comfortable cor- 
ner of the cabin. BiUie and Gene lay stretched on 
the lower bunk. The Doctor and Ben, the guide, 
sat near the stove, pipe in mouth, while, as I stated 
before. I lay on the upper bunk, waiting for the stories 
so soon to follow. It was the guide who spoke. 

" About two years ago. Joe and I were down in the 
woods, doing a little loggin' on our own hook. A light 
snow had fallen near the close of the day ; so next 
morning when I woke, a new carpet had covered the 
ground, and weighted down the branches of the firs. 
When I went to the spring I noticed a pretty good 
sized buck's tracks ; and in Imagination saw a fine 
pair of antlers. ' Joe.' I said as I entered the cabin, 



• suppose we follow him. meat's a little low and there's 
a fine pair of antlers there for some one.' 

•• • I'm agreed,' Joe answered. So we struck out 
as soon as we had the tins all washed. We followed 
the tracks down the trail half a mile, then across the 
ravine up the other bank, here we saw his marks as 
he tried his antlers on the young cherry trees. But 
on we went over the hill and along the stream for 
about a mile and a half. As we neared the bluff on 
the west side we moved more careful and as we 
rounded the bend we saw him, and he was a beauty, 
in good view, before you could wink an eye I fired 
and he jumped, but he didn't go more than twenty- 
five feet when he dropped. Oh no I didn't fire again. 
I never make a miss shot, when this 30-30 speaks 
she means business, and I make it a point never to 
follow a hit deer. You let him drop to rest as he 
must after being hit and you've got him without walk- 
ing a mile, but chase him and he seems to get 
strength at each jump. Of course you'll get him in 
the end but only after a long walk and a lot of trouble. 
| Let him alone and he won't go far. 

Well, he's a dead one, sure 'nuff,' said Joe, and 

I walked over to the buck. There he lay in a little 

hollow, with a look in those eyes as though he was 

I still alive ; and just as I grasped his antlers in the act 

I of turning him over to clean him, he sprang to his 

feet and the shock nearly sent me flying but I held to 
1 his horns and threw one arm around a tree that 
I chanced to be near, while I called to Joe. He came 

on a run but when he got to the tree he stood there 
[laughing ; the deer and I were having a merry-go-round 

about the tree, and how we did whirl ! I managed 
keep him at arm length although once or twice he 

3id stab at me, and its a wonder he didn't gore me, 

jut he seemed more anxious to get away than run me 

through. 

• You fool,' I cried, ' grab him by the hind legs, do 
[you want to see me killed before your eyes.' 

' How in can I, when you're going like 

it?' 

• Now's your chance,' I cried as the deer paused a 
loment; his strength was fast leaving him. Joe 
lade a lunge for the deer and at the same moment 

the buck let both hoofs fly and caught Joe on both 
knees ; the shock was so great that it tore my arm 
from the tree and I went to the bushes. When I 



picked myself up and looked for Joe I nearly doubled 
up for laughter. There he was bent over, holding on 
to his knees and hopping about like a toad. The 
tears were rolling down his cheeks and the air was 

fairly blue. 

.. . How In am 1 going to get out of these 

woods, I can't walk ten feet. That d— n thing broke 
every bone in my legs, and you. you d — n fool stand 
there laughing at me ; go and get a stretcher, but— 
that won't do, you can't carry me. I'll have to stay 
here till you can get some one. Why in the d — 1 did 
you tell me to grab his legs for. and besides I might 
have known better. But I'll fix you for this. I won't 
be able to walk all winter. And the buck's gone too 
is it ? Shut up. you fool.' 

" I was nearly in a fit laughing, fairly rolling on the 
ground. ' Oh, let it alone, Joe, you're not killed.' 

•• • Well, I tell you, I can't walk back to camp. I'm 
crippled for life.' 

•• • Oh come, sit down and rest a little and we'll 
talk of getting to camp afterwards.' After he had 
settled down for half an hour he was all right again, 
the deer had only numbed his legs, hadn't broken any 
bones, I knew that by the way he hopped about, so 
took It easy and got safely back to camp. 

•• • But the deer,' 1 exclaimed. ■ he didn't get away, 

did he?' 

•• • Not if I knew it.' Ben replied. When we left the 
tree I pulled out my knife and before we were fairly In 
the bushes, the deer felt its edge. But I never 
laughed as I did at Joe and now whenever I think of 
it I burst out. He was a sight well worth seeing." 

Raymoth. 



BIRD SHOOTING ABOUT AMHERST. 

Although the time which the average student has 
to devote to field sports is limited, yet it is not with- 
out a sense of exaltation that we become aware that 
the bird season is once more open. The primitive in- 
stincts rise within us and we tear ourselves away from 
sines and quadrants to take a tramp through the neigh- 
boring woods and along the familiar water-courses. 
We feel a keen delight in being among the falling 
leaves and fragrant pines and we tiptoe along scarcely 
daring to breath, awed by the majesty of nature. 

A gray squirrel jumps from a pile of brush and darts 
up the hidden side of a lofty chestnut to reappear 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»7 







' 




among the topmost branches. But we are out after 
birds and are glad that we have an excuse to let the 
creature live. The true sportsman is not a savage or 
a pot hunter. He does not go into the woods to kill 
and mangle in a promiscuous manner, but like a true 
sportsman entering a foot-ball game he endeavors to 
attain his ends by scientific and humane methods. 

The primary essentials for a day's bird-shooting are 
first a gun. preferably a double-barreled or repeating 
gun. both have their advocates, but whichever it Is. 
care should be taken in its selection. 
' The best gun for all-around shooting is a twelve 
gauge of some reliable make, weighing between seven 
and eight pounds and having not more than a modi- 
fied choke. The full choke is a nuisance as it 
bunches the shot and causes you to miss birds which 
you might have got with a more open pattern and 
mangles birds at the average range. 

The second requisite is a good dog and let me add 
that a dog's value does not alone lie in his pedigree as 
some amateurs seem to think, but in his intelligence 
and training, furthermore it may be safe to state that a 
dog's value decreases in proportion to the number of 
times he is borrowed; use your own dog yourself. 
While whipping the dog for premature flushing and 
other misconducts is oftentimes necessary, it should 
be resorted to only after all other methods have failed. 
After shooting a bird it is well, if you have a young 
dog. to stop and train him in - standing " over the dead 
body. He will work better afterwards. 

The first game bird which we shall probably meet 
is the ruffed grouse, it being the most common and 
largely known game bird in this country. The variety 
found about here is Bonasa umbella and is often 
erroneously called partridge. The flocks are local 
in their habits and wherever a brood of young is seen 
in midsummer, there is the place in which to look for 
them when the open season arrives, although exces- 
sive dry or wet seasons may cause them to migrate. 
Although grouse are not exceedingly plentiful here- 
abouts the law which has recently passed prohibiting 
their sale has given them a better chance to multiply 
and in the runs and sprout lots to the east and north 
of Amherst there are chances for many a f.ne day's 

s P ort - n M 

The true partridge, Ortyx Virginiana. or quail, as it 
is called, is more social in its habits and through the 



fall and winter Is seen in flocks feeding in open grass 
plots and in grain stubble. Upon being flushed they 
rise en masse and fly straight away, generally with 
the wind, thus giving the hunter opportunity to raise 
havoc among their ranks. 

In the woodcock we have a bird whose successful 
pursuit calls into action all the better qualities of the 

sportsman. 

The Philopela minor or American woodcock, is 
very typical of our New England woods although it is 
seldom taken from the pockets of the amateur sports- 

man. r . . 

Within a week the writer has seen two fine speci- 
mens not more than a few hundred feet from the new 
power station. It is a very intelligent bird and like 
its half brother the snipe has a remarkable faculty for 
dodging gun shot. But unlike another half brother, 
the sand piper, it is never seen in dense flights, being 
met with singly and in pairs, flying with its peculiar 
tumbling motion from cover to cover among the 
dense ravines and watered runs. Oftentimes it lights 
within plain view, trusting to the natural blending of 
its plumage to protect it from discovery. 

The foregoing constitute the principal game birds, 
aside from the water-fowl .to be found in New England. 
In some sections they are nearly extinct, and like the 
arbutus will doubtless soon be a thing of the past. 
In other sections through northern and western New 
England this sort of game is abundant, and protected 
as it is by state lands and by the posting of private 
lands bids fair to remain so for years to come. 



ACROSS THE LAKE. 

(With apologies to Tennyson.) 

Moonlight and evening calm, 

And one sweet girl with me. 
With but the silent stars above to watch 

As 1 put out to sea. 

A wealth of golden hair that hides a face 

From my beseeching glance. 
Falls a shimmering mantle o'er her fair form, 

And draws me near. 

Silence— and then a kiss. 

And after that some more. 
For who would dare refuse so sweet a gift 

When off the shore ? 

And as the sinking moon leaves us alone. 

And all around is dark, 
1 dra* her nearer still and ask no more. 

Nor seek to guide my bark. 



Obstrtf&tionsf^C onc,u S ,on S 



The Observer has spent many evenings lately in a 
way which would have made lchabod Crane green 
with envy. With a bright fire In the grate, a pitcher 
of sweet cider and a waste basket close at hand, the 
Observer together with four of his bosom friends are 
wont to sit with feet elevated far above their heads 
and with the smoking table near by hand while stories 
of the most imaginative type are •' swaped." 

Now the Observer has a motive for so spending his 
I valuable time : namely, to obtain material for a story 
I with which to capture a certain prize offered not long 
since by the Signal, but as yet no story has material- 
ized, mainly for the reason that the accounts of the 
exploits are so grossly inconsistent with commonsense 
that the Observer fears that a written copy of them 

[would be rejected. 

The Observer omitted to state that the above men- 
tioned bosom friends have travelled this summer. 
Perhaps the fact that they never travelled before 
accounts for the inconsistency of their reports. Three 
of them have been to Europe! and as it seems, in 
lorder to get a pull with the department of animal hus- 
bandry, they went on a cattle boat. This scheme 
[would doubtless have worked to perfection, had not 
■the report reached the ears of the department that 
while on the outward voyage one of the trio had vainly 
tried to milk a long-horned texan steer to obtain milk 
for breakfast. 

Upon reaching Liverpool they readily passed as 
immigrants and proceeded to London to see West- 
minster and other historical places. From this time 
antil the date of their return all is a blank as are the 
photographs which they took. 

The Observer hastens to state that he thinks his 

friends in no way responsible for the falling of the 

Campanile as the police reports of London state 

plainly that they did not go to the continent. The 

return voyage was exceedingly rough and before they 

tare four days out of Liverpool they had lost all. even 

bheir lately acquired reverence for dead English poets. 

The fact however that they stood upon the same soil 

s did once the great Shakespeare may aid them 

laterally in passing off junior English. It may be 



added that fifteen minutes out of Boston they fully 
•• came to " and have been all right since. 

The fourth of the bosom friends had no use for the 
big pond and so hied himself to the wild and woolly 
west where he hoped to find room in which to spread 
himself At Miles City. Mo., he attempted to mount 
his first bronco ; four days later he arrived at Miles 
City again from southern Kansas. Hb photographs 
are very good, some of them possibly being taken by 
starlight in southern Kansas. We may add that our 
friend has returned to college and is now taking a 
course in horticulture with the idea in view of later 
going into the cattle business in the middle west. 



Oct. 22- 
Oct. 23.- 
Oct. 24.- 

Oct. 25.- 
Oct. 26.- 

Oct. 30.- 

Oct. 31. 
Nov. 1. 

Nov. 2 



CALENDAR. 

-Address before Horticultural seminar by 

James Draper of Worcester at 7 45 p. m. 

-Y. M. C. A. meeting 7-30 p. m. Subject, 

•• Daily Work for God." 
-Prof. Petit's dancing-class in Drill Hall at 
7-15 p. m. •• Uncle Terry " in Town 

Hall at 8 00 P. M. 
-Football game with Tufts at Medford. 
-Services Stone Chapel at 9-15 a.m. Y. 

M. C. A. meeting at 3-30 p. m. 
-Regular meeting of Y. M. C. A. at 7-30 

p. M . Subject " Foundations." 
-Dancing class in Drill Hall at 7-15 p. H. 
-Football game with W. P. I. on campus at 

3-00 p. m. Meeting of Journal club at 

10-30 A. m. 
—Regular Sunday services in Stone Chapel. 



MEETING OF M. A. C. ALUMNI ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION. 

At a regular meeting of the above association held 
Oct 14 the following otficers were elected : Prof^ W. 
P Brooks, president ; Dr. J. B. Paige, vice-president; 
C. L. Flint, treasurer, and Prof. S. F. Howard sec- 
retary The above officers together with the follow- 
ing members will constitute a board of directors. 
Prof G. E. Stone. Prof. R. E. Smith and C F 
Deuel It was voted to instruct the directors to select 
a site for an athletic field and to purchase the same 
if in their judgment it was deemed advisable. 



V 




ib 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



19 












HORTICULTURAL SEMINAR. 



On Friday evening, Oct. 10. the senior division in 
Horticulture held its first seminar in the Botanic 
museum. The topic for discussion was "The His- 
tory of Grape Culture in the United States." and was 
presented by Professor Waugh in a very entertaining 
and instructive manner. Samples of the leading 
varieties of grapes were tested, and judgment passed 
upon. At the next seminar meeting, which is to be 
held Wednesday evening, Oct. 22, Mr. James Draper, 
a member of the board of trustees and also a member 
of the Park Board of Worcester, will give an informal 
talk on " Park Work." Mr. Draper is greatly inter- 
ested in the subject of Horticulture and is an author- 
ity in the art of managing parks. 

On Nov. 7, Edmund C. Powell, associate editor of 
the New England Homestead will give an address upon 
the subject " Apple growing as a business." 

Other speakers of eminence in the horticultural line 
will appear before the seminar in the near future, 
among them will be Herbert W. Collinwood, editor 
of the Rural New Yorker, who will be at the college 
sometime during the month of December. 



Mecoptera and Trichoptera ; H. T. Fernald. Aptery- 
gota, Anatomy. Histology, etc.. corrodentia, Mallop- 
haga and Isoptera ; H. J. Franklin. Rhynchophora and 
Aphididae; H. E. Hodgkiss. Orthoptera. Thysanop- 
tera and Enplexoptera ; G. H. Lamson. Lepidoptera 
except those of shade trees ; A. W. Morrill. Coccidal 
and Insecticides; A. T. Osmun. Coleoptera except 

those of shade trees and the Rhynchophora ; W. W. 

Peebles. Hymenoptera except Coccidal and Aphididal ; 

D N. West, Heteroptera; M. H. West, shade tree 

Coleoptera and Lepidoptera. 



CANDIDATES FOR ARMY EXAMINATION. 

In compliance with instructions received from the 
Adjutant General of the United States army requiring 
the names of three recent graduates to be sent in with 
the recommendation that they be ordered up for an 
army examination, the following names were sub- 
mitted: H. L. Knight, '02, A. L Dacy, '02, and N. 
D Whitman. '01. This examination will determine 
the fitness of the candidates to act as 2d lieutenants 
in case their services, as such.are required at a future 
time. 

JOURNAL CLUB. 

Tee regular meetings of the Journal Club will be 
held this year, on the first Saturday of each month at 
10-30 o'clock. At these meetings the members will 
report the contents of such articles which may appear 
in the scientific literature, concerning the subject or 
subjects which they have chosen. The following selec- 
tions have been made by the members of the club : 

E. A. Back, Dlptera and Sophonotera; H. A. 
Ballou. Ephemerida, Odonata. Plecoptera,Nemoptera, 



INTERCOLLEGIATE RIFLE CONTEST. 

Captain Anderson recently posted the results of 
the intercollegiate rifle contest which took place last 
spring under the supervision of Captain Sage. U. S. A. 
formerly commandant at this college. 

Six colleges entered the contest, one failing 
to qualify. The rating of the remaining five was as 
follows : University of California. '83 ; North Georgia 
Agricultural College. 75-6 ; Oregon Agricultural Col- 
lege. 73-4; Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
72-6 ; State University of Iowa, 64-4. 

In the contest, the Springfield rifle model 85 was 
used and a uniform charge of 70 grains of powder 
and a 500 grain ball was fired, standing, at 200 yards. 
The best score of the contest was made by Capt. 
N. Vanderbilt of the University of Calafornia who 
obtained 88 points out of a possible 100. while 
Ransehausen and Taylor of this college made 86 and 
84 points respectively. A similar contest is planned to 
take place during the coming spring. 






1905 INDEX BOARD. 

The class of 1905 have elected the following mem- 
bers to constitute the editorial board of the class 
Index : G. H. Allen, editor-in-chief ; Bertram Tupper. 
business manager ; S. S. Walker, assistant business 
manager, P. F. Williams, artist ; H. H. Goodenough, 
A. N. Swain, literary-editors. F. L. Yeaw. A. D. 
Taylor, associate-editors. 



•• If the people who can't write had the brains of 
those who can and those who can had the skill of 
those who can't what a glorious literature we should 
have."— Life. 



/UMetic No"^S- 



FOOTBALL. 
Dartmouth. 0; Massachusetts, 0. 

Wednesday Oct. 8, for the first time In her his- 
jry, Massachusetts met Dartmouth at football. It 
vas a great game of ball and both sides seemed to be 
<Jn it to win. Massachusetts had the kick off at the 
beginning of the first half, and with the ball in the 
hands of the Dartmouth boys, the first part of the 
game pointed to a sure victory for the home team. 
Up to Massachusetts 40-yard line Dartmouth had but 
little trouble to gain round the visitors* ends. There, 
however, a fumble gave Massachusetts the ball. 
Dartmouth held for two downs and Snell punted, the 
bell going outside. It was Dartmouth's ball at about 
the center of the field. Again they ran round the 
ends for short gains, but Massachusetts soon regained 
the ball, and it was her turn to make gains. Time 
and again it took three downs to make the five-yard 
gain necessary to retain possession of the ball. On 
Dartmouth's 30-yard line. Massachusetts attempted a 
place kick on third down. Patch made a bad pass. 
O'hearn ran back and picked up the ball and came 
Within a few yards of making it first down. It was 
Dartmouth's ball however and she soon carried it out 
of danger. For the remainder of the half, neither 
»|de had the advantage and the half ended with the 
ball in the hands of the home team at about the cen- 
ter of the field. 

The second half Dartmouth kicked off and soon 
forced Massachusetts to punt. Then encouraged by 
the cheers of her supporters, the New Hampshire 
team took a strong brace ; and yard by yard they 
worked the ball toward their opponent's goal and vic- 
tory. Nearer and nearer came the goal posts, but 
the visitors were desperate. On their three yard line 
they held for no gain, and when the ball was fumbled 
H the second down. Quigley fell on it. It was Mass- 

phusetts ball only about a foot from their own goal. 

lid they buckled to the work. Snell, Halligan. Mun- 
Lewis and Conelly were in turn sent through 

mmouth's line for short gains. Back to the cen- 
of the field they carried the ball. There the 

\mt team held for two downs, and Snell punted. 

it Dartmouth back muffed the punt and Ahearn 



fell on the ball. Again the New Hampshire line was 
unable to hold against the mass plays of the visitors. 
On Dartmouth's 25-yard line with only a minute to 
play. Snell attempted a kick from placement. It was 
a fine kick as to direction, but just a few inches too 
low, and when the ball went under the cross bar In- 
stead of over it the last chance to score had been 
lost. Dartmouth kicked out from behind their 25- 
yard line and after two more rushes the half was over 
with the ball in Massachusetts possession on Dart- 
mouth's 50-yard line. The line-up: L y 

DARTMOUTH. MASSACHSEUTS. 

Bullock. 1. e. <■• •« O'Hearn. Proulx 

Smith. R. B.. I. t. r - l - Sne11 

Gage. 1. g. r - B" Franklin 

Smith. A. K.. c. c - Patch 

dough, r. g. '• B" Craighead 

Place, r. t. '• *•• Hal,i e an 

Farmer, r. e. »• e - Ahearn 

McGrath. q.b. q. b.. Qu.gley 

Dillon, r. h. »• h - Connelly 
Vaughn, I. h. 
Knibbs, f. b. 
Score— Dartmouth 0. Massachusetts 0. 



f. b., Munson 




Massachusetts. 5 ; Wesleyan, 6. 
The result of last Saturday's game with Wesleyan 
was as surprising as It was unsatisfactory to the sup- 
porters of our college. The score was against us but 
the game was really ours. The fact that we were 
cheated out of a touchdown at the end of the second 
half by the open unfairness of the Wesleyan official 
does not hide the fact that Wesleyan made nearly all 
her gains off trick plays while In straight football our 
team was far the stronger. The Wesleyan line was 
shattered again and again by the rushes of our backs 
while our line was a stone wall. 

After the first kick-off. Wesleyan was soon held for 
downs. Massachusetts then by line bucking carried 
the ball forward fifteen yards but lost It on a fumble 
by Munson. Wesleyan being unable to gain soon lost 
the bail and Massachusetts soon rushed it over for a 
touchdown. Halligan failed to kick the goal. 

After the second kick-off, Massachusetts rushed 
the ball 20 or 25 yards but lost It as a penalty on a 
forward pass. Then Wesleyan by a trick play made 
a run of 50 yards, the runner being caught from 
behind by Munson. Soon after, another trick play 
resulted In a touchdown. Connelly kicked off to 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




1 Pol Econ Veterinary 

^^T soon lost .he tall on^ ^^.l^^any E"'^^' "°'^'° 
MaTaohusetts rushed .he tall t. Wesleyan's 2Cyard | FYanklin 8««* ^^^ Hot , lcultuI< 



Wesleyan. 



Franklin— ooi-i.y. -— - - Hnrt , cuUure . 
u m«*« Botany, Entomology, Horticulture. 

s=r.^ r -ass ,0, v^sz^tts Ho " e 

;C ond half. Brown k.cked off for we _ Hood __ A griculture. English Pol. 



I Hood— Agriculture. English Pol. Econ 
Q : g |e, fumh.ed Jta, taUtaU. tauntad^ ^I^X-V. — « -man 
hands who advanced it seven yaru 



s'who advanced it seven yards. « »»- -I L amson -Entoniology. Horticulture P. G. Zoology 
exchanged hands several time, ^^^Z^^. Horticulture. Pol.^co, 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ai 



ba „ exchangee , ■- — (B sKady l<«|Mon«»«-«^— ^J^,,,^ Pol. Econ 



.ell's arms. **- osmun ~7' ,^" rc Pol. Econ.. Veterinary. 

Sos:^ ,e ha,, ~- ■— ; fersS 



„„» do»n." Here Wesleyan's officials ^r*-^,^. EnW mology. Hor.lcul.ure. 
put up a long Wok. declaring .ha, SneU furnbled .he | Poole-Agr^^^ ^^ ^^ 



declared it 



„ g ,ha, SneU fumbled .he Poole- ftg-- — Hor.icul.ure. 

Ptndlng ,a. ,e, ^ -J * - £ ^^lls,, English. M—lcs. 

' Eta5==^^«--2; 




Mint Proulx-Agr.cu ■■ Mathematlcs . 

J fattTta"^ 'he'y oecided .o con.lnue .he play. ^^^ WemaUcs. Pol. Econ 
^he Wesleyan "fflcla. here warned our team ,o be | Sne.l-Engmeer, g _ __ M . thelMlW 



ball 



— E. B. Snell and C. P. Halligan have been spend- 
g a few days with Pierson, '01. at his home in 
eriden, Conn. 

—Work at the boarding-house is progressing rap- 
|y and the building will be ready for occupancy 
ibout Thanksgiving. 

A second team has been organized and it is 
§cpected that a schedule of a few games will be 
■ranged within a few days. 

—The colleges are now being heated from the new 
ating plant. The heating station will be completed 
latter part of next week, 
president Goodell and Dr. Fernald have returned 
from Atlanta, Ga.. where they have been atterding a 
ivention of the state colleges, 
fc— The Military Department has announced the 
lowing promotions: Corp. P. W. Brooks to be 
sergeant ; M. F. Ahearn to be corporal ; H. C. Allen 
to be corporal. 

R-H. C. Bowen, '03. was seriously hurt last week 
while playing football. His knee was thrown out of 
joint and his whole system badly shaken 
attended by Dr. Branch. 



He is 



The summary was as follows 

WESLEY AN. 

Eyster, 1. e. 
Goode, I. t. 
Brown. 1. g- 
Gillispie. c. 
Espy. r. g.. 
Forbes, r. t. 
Outhrop, Rogers, r. 
Calder, q. b. 

Lacey, 1- h. b - 
MacDonnell, r. h. b 
Cobb, Vansurdam. f. b 



—Rope-pull— when ? 

— Thirty-hour-a-week drill ? 

__R R Raymoth. '04. has returned to college. 

-Senior Seminar meeting this evening at 

_.;' -Manager Cook of the baseball team has 
i.e..AHearn sch edule nearly completed. 
q .b..Quigley __ The basket ball team expects to make a 
h % h ; b c;nn e et|through New York this season, 
f. b.. Munson 



MASSACHUSETTS 

r. e.. Spur 

r. t., SneU 

r. g., Franklin 

c. Patch 

1. g., Craighead 

1. t.. Halligan 




Alumni 



hi 



f ' W wtleyan' 6. Massachusetts 5. Touchdowns- L ourse in landscape gardening^ 
Score-Wesieyan . .„», n _c a lder. Umpire— 1L ... .i, IO nf nnr men 1 



"coal 7ronTtouchdown-Calder. Umpire- 1 
F D °;r Retee-tuden. Linesmen-Schneider. Proul, 
°™la)n, halves. Timer-Marvel. 



Attendance — 500. 



SENIOR ELECT1VES. 

The various members of .he senior Cass have 
elecled the following courses '. 
.Hen-Chemistry. German, Ma.hemalics. 
Bacon-Engineering. Pol. Econ.. Ma.hema.lcs. 
la rus-Hor,.cu„ure. Pol. Econ.. Ve.erlnary. 
Bowen-Bo.ony, En.omology. Horticulture, 
tooks. Hor.lcul.ure. Pol. Econ.. Ve.erlnary. 



L3, Eugene H. Lehnert, Professor Veterinary 

Science and Physiology, Conn. Agricultural College, 
Storrs, Conn. 

•93. _A. Edward Melendy, Clerk and Wire-Tester, 
117 W. Bolston St.. Worcester. 
•93,-John R. Perry. Interior Decorator and 
• d West '03 are taking a spe p a | n ter. 8 Bosworth St., Boston. 

~ e ^LanVcape gardening.' ^.-Cotton A. Smith. Care of N. B. Blackstone 

Ihnut twelve of our men have joined the adva: Co ., Los Angeles , C al. 
— ADom iw -93,-Fred A. Smith. Florist and Nurseryman. 265 

rtancine class ot rro.eb&ui 

Walsh '05 who sprained his ankle some we, Ecclid A ve., Lynn. 
— waisn. . i0Q{ba \\ field. f 3.— Luther W. Smith, Supt. of Highland Farm, 

ago, is again on lnten; ^ ^ ^ Southwestern Rice Co.. Manteno. III. 

Pantain Ahearn of tne DasM= i ««»• 

P the ten th of November. -93._Henry F. Staples. Physician and Surgeon, 

to start practice ^ ^ ^ Dartmo Wade Park A ve., Cor. of Marcy. Cleveland, Ohio. 

^^Zl J-— ; h ;; 2 Z££££? SU8ir P,an,er and Man ' 

Sp7nX a a y has B s^w^',ha,,«m S .or r ne,,se 3i *.-Ed„ard ,. Walker. Farmer. Box 31,| 



"94.— Claude E. Walker spent a part of his sum- 
mer vacation in town. 

•95. h. W. Lewis, 39 White Court. Clinton. Mass. 

•95, H. D. Hemenway has volumes 2, 3 and 4 of 

the Aggie Life bound and ready for sale at two dollars. 
Mr. Hemenway wishes to purchase numbers 1 — 6 
inclusive of volume 7 

'96.— Short Course.— J. A. Davis, Ciagade Anlla. 
Cuba, overseer on a large plantation. 

•97, James L. Bartlett, Escauaba. Mich. 

'00.— A. A. Harmon wishes the change of his 
address to 588 Broadway. Lowell. 

'97.— Charles A. Peters, now Professor of Chem- 
istry in the University of Idaho was In town recently. 

•97. James L. Bartlett was in town recently. 

He Is now employed in the weather bureau. Little 
River, Mich. 

'98.— George H. Wright and Helen Maria Steb- 
bins of Deerfield. were married Sept. 17. 

'98.— Alexander Montgomery. Jr., was in town 
recently. 

•99._Charles Morehouse Walker had a vacation 
of eight weeks recently, part of which he spent In 
town. 

Ex-'OO. A. D. Gile was recently married at Salt 

Lake City. Mr. and Mrs. Gile are now In Worcester. 

Ex-'OO. W. R. Crowell is now In the telephone 

business at Aurora. 111. 

•00.— Howard Baker. V. M. D.. 70 West St., 

Pittsfleld. 

•00.— Francis Guy Stanley spent a few days at col- 
lege during the opening days of the fall semester. 

•00. H, L. Crane was about college recently. He 

is In the small fruit business with his father. 

•01. Thomas Casey, Student of Law with John 

F. Mcgrath, 15 Railroad St., Fitchburg. 

•01.— Ernest Leslie Macomber, freight clerk In 
Taunton office of the N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R. Co. 

•01.— D. B. Tashjian. landscape gardener. Rock 
House. Littleton. N. H. or 10 Mills St.. Boston. 

•02.— V. A. Gates. 1116 West 3d St.. Little Rock, 
Ark. 



I 




I 

■III 










THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



23 




•02.-C. 1. Lewis with Tellows & Vose, florists. 
Hyde Park. 

'02 -Samuel Leroy Smith has entered the second 
yea r class at the Springfield Y. M. C. A. Training 
School. Springfield, Mass. 

•02.— F. H. Plumb, Bridgeport. Conn. 
02.— E. B. Saunders, Southwick. Mass. 
•02 -T M Carpenter has resigned his position in 
the division of Foods and Feeding of the Hatch 
Experiment Station in order to accept a more _ lucra- 
tive situation in the Pennsylvania Experiment Station^ 
Mr Carpenter will assist Dr. Fries a portion of the 
year upon the Respirations Colorimeter There are 
only two of these machines in operation In this 
country ; one at Middletown. Conn., and the other at 
he Jate College. Pa. They have been recenUy 
brought to a high degree of efficiency, and are prob- 
ably superior to those in operation in Germany. 

•02.— F. R. Church is also employed at the Hatch 
Experiment Station. 



Spring Clothes. 



Jvist the sorts that young men will appreciate. 
There's a collection here that absolutely cannot 
be found elsewhere In Western New England. 
Will you come and see It? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 



Sfkingvikld, 



Mass. 





PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 

New York 

Central 

Lines 



DAILY SERVICE 



throuoh coaches I EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 



To ALBANY, 
To BUFFALO, 
To CHICAGO, 
To CINCINNATI, 
To DETROIT, 
To ST. LOUIS, 



Through the 
Famous . • • 



9 Trains 
8 Trains 
7 Trains 
3 Trains 
5 Trains 
3 Trains 



BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



TO MO FROM BOSTON VIA PM.MER, 

AB FOLLOWS ! 



SLEEPING CARS 



DINING CARS 



RKAU DOW*. 

9.0T, A.M. 6.W F.M. 

».nO •• «.4.% ■ 

10.00 " «.M " 
ION) " P.Ol " 
11.80 " »<« " 



It. Amherst 
ar. Palmer 
It. Palmer 
ar. Worcester 
ar. Boston 



bead it. 
nr. 9.06 A.M. 8.3fiP.M. 
1T.8.S0 " 7.51 " 
ar.7.38 " 7.36 •' 
It. O.M - 6.10 •• 
IT. 5.00 " 5W " 



Berkshire 

bills . . . 

AHD TUB 

jllbaiip GatctDap, 

Which it alwaye Open. 



u 



For further 



information, time tables, etc., call on ticket agents or 



address, A. 8. HANSON, Q.V. A., Boston, Mass. 



'02.— Arthur L. Dacy is assistant superintendant at 
tie Dentonia Park farm. East Toronto. Canada. 

•02.— Orrin F. Cooley is employed in the city engi- 
ser's office, Springfield. 

•02.— Ransom W. Morse is teaching chemistry 
id physics in St. Austin's school. Salisbury. Conn. 

•02.— F. H. Plumb. Instructor in Mathematics and 

:ience at the Connecticut Military academy. Nor- 

ilk, Conn. 

Ex-'04.— Miss Evelyn Whitehead and Hervey C. 
Jerce were married at Millbury on the afternoon of 

;t. 16. Rev. Samuel Hodgkiss, rector of St. 

shn's Episcopal church of Wilkinsonville, officiated. 

le wedding was attended by the parents and intimate 

»nds only of the young people. Mr. Pierce and 
bride will visit New York and other points on their 

|dal trip. They will reside in West Millbury. Mrs. 
»rce is a graduate <of the Millbury high school in 
the class of 1901. 




THE IDEA! 

neh, Billiard, Hair Dressing 



AN1> 



MANICURING ROOMS. 

,ok'« Ulock, .... up one ttgM, 

Postal Cards and Stamps at cost. 

Cigard and Tobacco to burn. 

Gentlemen you are always welcome. 




DWIGHT W. THURBER, Prop'r. 



ou r Girl 

Would appreciate a bouquet of our Chrys- 
anthemums. They come at $1 a dozen. 
We get the dollar, the girl gets the 
'mums, and you get the girl. Isn't that 
satisfactory ? 

I HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT, 
MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

Telephone 4-2. 



GheHEIR 

to the FARM 



t ,*r. 



!/ 



] \'i 



s 



ii 



Will make the old fnrm pay 
If he farms the farm in the 
modern way. 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

Gaught by Mail. 

A thorough and practical court* 
under the direct charge of Win. 1\ 

B lea, I'll. I'.. (Massachusetts A^- 

ricultural ( ollege). Our course U 
baaed on "Brooks' Agriculture;" II 
treats of soils, plants, tillage, drain- 
age.lrrlgation. manures, f< 1 tilitation, 
riu|i rotation and everything pet" 
raining t'> money-making <m the 
farm. Tertbooks (3 volumes, BOO 
pages, 300 illustrations) fieu to stu- 
dents. Send for 3<, page book de- 
scribing course in full. 

Home 
Correspondence 

Schools. 

Springfield. MajJ. 
Other Course: UiikIih ■■■■<. Shorthand. 
Penmanship, Typewrttluit. Kuraal 
course II t» for tea* ber's eerttBcavte. 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGEH, 

200 Broadway, New York. 



Club Biid College Pins ami KlngB. 
Gold mid Silver Modal-. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry. 



"UP TO THE 



ii 



IN 



MEN' S FINE SH OES. 
The Northampton Shoe Co., 



88 Main St., 



Nohtiiamiton, Maun. 



V 












THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




lrYt*rco..*£i&'te 



The will of Maria Wales bequests $10,000 to Har 

vard University. 

There are about three hundred and twenty-five fresh- 
men at Smith college. 

Williams College has registered 138 freshmen, the 
largest class in its history. 

Amherst's cider meet took place on Pratt field 
Oct. 18. and was won by the junior class. 

The work on the new athletic field on Massachusetts 
avenue for Boston college is being pushed rapidly. 

Harvard has picked out the first ten men from the 
class of 1905 for the Institute of 1770 and the P. K. 

E. 

No attempt is being made to re-organize the tri- 
angular league between Amherst, Williams and 
Wesleyan. 

There has been an unwritten law at Brown that the 
freshmen shall not use the walk on the North side of 
Historic Hall. The two hundred and twenty freshmen 
determined to use this walk and are doing so In spite 
of all the attempts of the Sophomores to prevent them 



BO YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 



Write a Note 

to Johnson 

W l,et. you want a book, a picture, KM stationery 
or anything else worth having. 

Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AND ART DEALER, 



313-315 Main St., 



Springfield, Mhsh 




Trade Makks 
Designs 
^7i Copyright* Ac. 

Anyone sendln. "^.^ftS^E^S 
quickly ■»°« rt * , 2.?VI ^antible. Communlea- 
JnTentW 1» £«««£& ^'nanXwk on Patent* 

Ifoentmc American. 

A handsomely «£££ £g& ftKWfc 
C yek« °r f rn'ontCrSoWal) tf-»W 

MUNN & Co. 36,BroadwaT New York 

'""2." Ofnce"«» T SU Washington. D. C. 



HENRY iVr>iVI*I» 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



A Mil BUST, MASH 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 5, 1902. 



NO. 3 



Published Fortnightly by Student, of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. ^ 

^t to .11 subscribers until Its discontinuance .s erdered and arrears are pa.a. ^ ^^ 

Klfy the Business Manager. — 

f BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1903. Edltor-in Chief. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN. 1903. Business Manager. 

u/-.u/ion MnRT.AN WHITE, 1 904, Assistant Business Manager. 

HOWARD MORGAN wm t. ^ ^^^ FRANKUN) , 903i A lumni Notes. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903, College Notes. FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904, Athletics. 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON, 1903, ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904, Interco'legiate. 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904. Department Notes. HERBERT HAROLD GOODENOUGH, 1905. 
GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. I 



I iT^i- r„«l«- lot Poataae outside o* United Statee and Canada, 88 c. extra. 

Termei »IOO per gear in adoanc*. Si ngle Copjea^JQ^^oragej.^ 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 



FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES. IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES. FISHING TACKLK 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Sprlngfl.Ul rifle, 
Sunday and night call, responded to at residence, first «•» 
west of Chase's Block. 




C. A. 
Ball Association, 
ige Boarding Club, 
ling- Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottlngham, Pres. Athletic Association, 

p W Brooks, Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

C P. Halllgan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

R. H. Robertson, Sec. Fraternity Conference. . 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
J, G. Cook, Manager. 
A. L. Peck, Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered is second-class matter, Pest Office at Amherst. 



Editorials. 





In this Issue we publish the stanzas of a college 
song written by Mr. Knight. "02. and entitled " Sons 
of Old Massachusetts." It will be remembered that 
this production won for Its author the prize offered by 
the Collece Signal In the song contest of last spring. 
The words have been placed in the hands of a musical 
composer and we hope to place the music, arranged 
for male voices, before the students in the near future. 



HOTEL. HENK1NG. 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

rirnt Class Lunch. Rooms •}■<**** upwards; with BaU 
tlTtUi-00. Double,**.*); with Bath. •J0O- 

18 MM* «.. oppose **• MP* + ** + *. mm 

Teleplione, *. r >9-3. 



Jltir Near Union 8 tat lot 

COOLEY'S HOTBI*,si-kin U ki B lu, ma« 

HKNKY K. MA1WH, Proprietor. 

All the modern conveniences. First class MM* 
modations for 300 guests. 

RESTAURANT ^NTHiTeUROPEAN PLAN. 



Much dissatisfaction is being expressed over the 
delay at which periodicals are delivered at the read- 
ing-room. Prior to this semester they were placed 
upon the shelves at noon which was none too early, 
considering the fact that they arrive at Amherst from 
all points at or before 9-00 a. m. Owing to a change 
in the delivery system, however, it is now nearly four 
o'clock before students have the opportunity of learn- 
ing the news of the previous day. It has been sug- 
gested that the papers be sent to the College grounds 



by trolly. Immediately after their arrival in Amherst, 
and that the reading-room assistant be sufficiently re- 
numerated for his extra trouble of carrying the 
matter from the Experiment Station or some other 
convenient point to the reading-room. It would 
hardly seem that the College Is sufficiently Isolated to 
warrant such a delay in the delivery of news , as now 
exists. 

At a recent meeting of the fraternity conference a 
committee was appointed to look after a series of In- 
formal dances to be held In the Drill hall during the 
ensuing season. It is planned to run these affairs on 
about the same plan as those of last year. Dancing 
will be Indulged In between the hours of five and nine 
p. m.. thus giving ample time for participants to se- 
cure cars to and from Holyoke and Northampton. 
The College orchestra under the direction of J. W. 
Gregg, which gave great satisfaction last year has 
been engaged again for the coming season. The first 
of this series of dances will be given Friday evening. 
Nov. 14. in honor of the foot ball team. The College 







THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



27 



■■ 



band will alternate with the orchestra in furnishing 
music and special decorations and attractions will be 
in evidence. Refreshments will be served from buf- 
fet tables and a bonfire on the campus will close the 
evening's festivities. It is hoped that every student 
or alumnus about College who is interested in danc- 
ing will make a special endeavor to be present at this 
affair. 



The theory has been advanced that the work of 
state colleges is often impeded by the close proximity 
of Experiment Stations and class-room and that the 
efficiency of instructors is modified by reason of their 
also being investigators in various lines of station work. 
The notion that the teacher of advanced sciences 
should be Interested and versed in the theoretical part 
of his subject alone seems to be prevalent. In the 
annual report of the office of Experiment Stations, 
however. Mr. A. C. True, director, in speaking of the 
outlook for the Massachusetts Experiment Station 
states: "The utilization of the work of advanced 
students in connection with the entomological investi- 
gations of the station Is a good example of the advan- 
tage of the combination of an experiment station and 
agricultural college in the same institution, provided 
it is well equipped for higher work in special lines." 
Mr. True has often advanced the opinion that the ex- 
periment station Investigator is out of his proper 
sphere when in the class-room. If his observations of 
the work of Massachusettss. advanced students and 
graduates has led him to form a contrary opinion, it 
is certainly to the credit of our instructors who in so 
many cases are connected with the Experiment Sta- 
tion. 



RADIUM, THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL 
WONDER. 

The developments of chemical and physical re- 
search in the past few years seem marvelous to us 
who reap benefits from them. 

They are not, however, beyond some of the wild 
dreams of those who lived at a time when every spark 
of individual reasoning was promptly extinguished. 
Perhaps much of the alchemists belief was not mad- 
ness. The philosopher's stone may not be found, but 
the perpetual lamp seems near realization. 

During the year 1896. Henri Becquerel, while 



working on salts of Uranium, discovered a new prop- 
erty of matter, whether chemical or physical is still a 
question, which has been called radio-activity. Sub- 
stances possessing this property emit light rays with- 
out apparent source of energy. 

The source of the most radio-active compounds, or 
elements, if such they prove to be. is pitchblende, a 
mineral of Uranium. Three strongly radio-active 
substances which have been separated are Polonium, 
allied to Barium, and Actinium, allied to Titanium. 

Radium and Polonium have atomic weights and 
characteristic spectra which proves that they are sim- 
ple substances. 

Radium is by far the most radio-active element 
It is obtained as a chloride with chloride of Bariurr, 
from which it never has been completely separated. 
Since Barium and its compounds are not radio-active, 
this property proves the presence of a new element. 
Radium Chloride is sixty times as active as 

Uranium. 

The same chloride, dissolved in water and precipi- 
tated with alcohol, has produced a substance seven- 
teen-thousand times as active as Uranium. 

Thorium seems to be the weakest radio-active 

element. 

Uranium, which is much stronger, produces an Im- 
pression on a photographic plate after an exposure of 
one hour. Radium produces the same effect in 
thirty seconds. These rays resemble the famous 
Roentgen rays. They permeate black paper, metai 
sheets and if the hand be held between their source 
and a screen of the proper material, the bones of the 
fingers are shown In outline on the screen. 

They also ionize gases through which they pass 
and possess the power of electrification. 

A radio-active substance has been found capable 
of discharging a gold-leaf electroscope at a distance 

of one-half metre. 

Radium rays have oxidizing power, changing the 
oxygen of the air to ozone, if the substance be closely 
confined, and, If under glass, producing a brown color 
in the glass, probably by oxidizing Manganese In it. 
They also induce chemical action. 

A little of the radio-active substance placed in a 
capsule and bound on the arm has produced a burn 
and under similar conditions has charred paper. 

Rays from the same substance may or may not be 



^viable, the deviable rays being the more pene- 

fating. 
Deviation in an electrostatic field, and transporta- 
3 n of electric charges are two tests which identify 
jem with Cathode rays. 
Roentgen rays produce a fluorescent effect only so 
ng as they strike the fluorescent body, while Radium 
\ys produce an effect lasting several days. 
| Much greater activity Is conferred, however, if the 
I»n -active substance be mixed into a solution of a 
radio-active salt, Barium thus treated becoming dif- 
ferent from ordinary Barium. 

I Roentgen rays have been defined as pulses through 
the ether from interrupted streams of highly-charged 
molecules. It Is thought by some that these new 
rays are midway between Roentgen rays and light 
rays in their character. As one has expressed it 
they a.e irregular pulses through the ether which are 
beginning to manifest regularity By comparing the 
magnetic with the electrostatic deviation the velocity 
of the pulses has been calculated and found equal to 
one-half that of light. 

Sfo/ith this abundance of facts the mystery as to the 
source of radio-activity remains unsolved although 
several theories have been advanced. 

The continuous disengagement of energy has been 
ascribed to phosphorescence of long duration, to sec- 
ondary emissions of light provoked by rays constantly 
existing in space and absorbed only by certain ele- 
ments, and to emission of matter with a loss of weight 
not apparent. The last theory is supported by Bec- 
querel himself who supposes the emission to be of the 
same order as that from certain scented substances, 
ethers or, musk for example 

This theory is also supported by the calculation that 
the loss of matter from each square antlmeter of sur- 
face of the radio-active substance would equal one 
milligram in one-thousand million years. 

The atomic weights of the allied elements are high 
as the following figures show : 

ELEMENT AT. WT. 

Barium 137 

Bismuth 208 

Thorium 232 

Uranium 239 

Tfrom the fact that they are bodies of dense atoms, 
Sir William Crookes conceives that they have a 



structure which, by atomic activity, enables them to 
throw off the slow-moving atmospheric molecules and 
to reduce the speed of the swift moving ones with ad- 
ditional energy to the body, this enejgy being used 
partly in dissociating some of the molecules of the 
gas and partly in producing the phenomenal pulses 
through the ether. The checking of swiftly moving 
atmospheric molecules would cool the air near the 
substance but radiation and conduction would effec- 
tually cover this clue as to the source of energy. 

Whether or not the source be found, since Uran- 
ium Is three or four times as active as its salts, may 
we not expect wonders of Radium when freed from 
its chloride. 

Madam Currie, of Paris, who with her husband has 
done much toward obtaining a better knowledge of 
these substances, got from a half ton of Uranium res- 
idues, only two kilograms of Barium chloride rich in 

Radium. 

In view of this fact we may expect developments to 
come slowly and if Radium be obtained free, it will 
far exceed our richest metal in value. 

The facts at hand have at least shown us these 
two things, that the physicist and the chemist must 
work hand in hand, and that Physical Chemistry is 
destined to open up spleneid avenues for the progress 
of science. W. Tottincham. 



UNSOLVED PROBLEMS OF CHEMISTRY. 

ELEMENTS. 

The first duty of the chemist is to examine every 
kind of matter accessible to him and to determine 
whether it Is an element or not. If it is not. and this 
is usually the case, as regards the things found In 
nature, his next duty is to attack the compound in 
every way that is likely to lead to its decomposition, 
and when he reaches a substance from which he can- 
not get simpler ones, he calls this an element. What 
elements are in the earth, in the air. in the water? 
An immense amount of work has been done that has 
had for its object the answering of this question. The 
earth has been ransacked almost from pole to pole. 
The air from all sorts of localities has been examined. 
The waters, from ocean, rivers and springs have been 
made to stand and answer the searching question of 
the chemist. 

What Is the result? In brief, it is this: Although 



H 



as 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



29 





1 4 




































I 






we find an Infinite number of kinds of matter, all of 
these can be resolved into a comparatively small 
number of elements. Altogether, between seventy 
and eighty elements have been found. Out of these 
simplest forms of matter everything that we see or 
feel, or are in anyway cognizant of, Is made up. But 
now arises the deep quesiton : What is an element ? 
To this question chemists are not able to give an 
answer. Have the elements existed from the begin- 
ning of time, or have they been formed from a small 
number of simpler forms of matter. Is a question that 
we cannot help asking. It may as well be acknowl- 
edged at once that there is practically nothing known 
In regard to the origin of the elements. 

It has been suggested that the elements are the 
products of an evolutionary process that has been in 
progress from the beginning, and that they all owe 
their existence to a form of matter, simpler than any 
of the so-called elements. Some evidence in favor 
of this view seems to be furnished by the spectro- 
scopic examination of the celestial bodies. The neb- 
ulae have been shown to contain the smallest number 
of our chemical elements ; the hotter stars are some- 
what more complex ; in the colored stars and the sun 
a large number of elements appear ; while the planets 
are the most complex. The complexity seems to 
depend upon the temperature. The higher the tem- 
perature the smaller the number of elements present. 
The elements known to us are probably derived from 
simpler forms, or from one single simplest form. If 
this Is the true conception of the relations between 
the elements then in the beginning space must have 
been filled with an incandescent vapor made up of the 
simplest form of matter. As this has cooled it has 
taken other forms, and some of these are the things 
we now call elements 

LAWS OF CHEMICAL CHANGE. 

Chemical actions are so rapid that it Is Impossible 
to make observations during their course. During the 
past fifteen or twenty years some of the great laws of 
chemical action have been discovered. What has 
been learned Is, however, only enough to whet the 
appetite of chemists. To Illustrate in another way 
what Is meant by making an observation during a 
chemical action, take the case of gunpowder. This 
usually consists of charcoal, sulphur and saltpeter. A 



spark is sufficient to cause the chemical action that is 
accompanied by the explosion. We can collect 
everything that Is formed, and show what changes in 
composition have taken place. But we should like to 
know something about the action itself. And so it is 
with the most common chemical changes that are 
studied in the laboratory. If one only could get a 
series of pictures at short intervals, we might by com- 
bining these afterward get an idea what is taking 
place. There are ways of controlling certain classes 
of chemical actions and reducing their speed, so that 
observations can be made during their progress, and 
much has been learned in this way. 

Everyone knows that water is the most abundant 
substance on the earth. It also plays a more impor 
tant part in the changes that are taking place on the 
earth than any other substance. We are only begin- 
ning to know how it acts That it dissolves many 
things is well known, but let us not be misled because 
this phenomenon is so common, and so familiar. 
Put a little salt In water. What becomes of It ? It 
disappears. There is no solid substance in the vessel. 
We cannot tell what has become of the salt. We 
can get the salt out of the water by boiling the solu- 
tion and letting the water pass off as steam, when the 
salt will be left behind. As we put the salt in and 
take it out, we have been accustomed until recently 
to think of the salt as being present in the solution as 
such. One of the most important advances in chem- 
istry made of late years is that which leads to the 
conception that. In dilute solutions at least there is 
little, if any, salt present ; that, in some way, the 
water decomposes it into particles highly charged 
with electricity. These particles are called Ions. 
This idea has thrown a great deal of light upon Impor- 
tant problems of chemistry, but it has suggested many 
new ones. Some substances, for example sugar, do 
not act like salt when dissolved In water. Why this 
difference? Then again, some liquids which are 
good solvents do not act like water. What is it in 
water that distinguishes it from most other liquids, 
such as alcohol and ether, enabling it to tear many 
substances asunder. These are questions that are 
now very much to the front. Rapid progress is being 
made, and we may look for Important discoveries In 

this field in the near future. 

R. H. R.. 1903. 



THE PLEASURE OF BEING PLEASANT. 

•* Good morning, 'tis a pleasant day," I remarked 

I greeted old Robert the boatman, on the footbridge. 

the sun rose over Saddleback. 

••Well, I'll try to make it pleasant." was his 
loinder. 

■The words struck me peculiarly, no doubt the 
thought was in my mind as well as in the mind of 
others, but it never found utterance in just this manner. 
••Ml try to make it pleasant." The words have been 
ringing in my head since the day they were uttered. 
They are the words of a philosopher ; the words of a 
man experienced In the pleasures as well as the hard- 

ps of life. And coming as they did but a few days 

^r the death of the one most dear to him in his old 
they carried an added weight of influence. 
Oh, pshaw, fellows, this Is no sermon, don't turn 

ky disgusted. These are but a few impressions of 
an Idler who has observed some things and noted 
them on his cuff." Now as a matter of fact we are 
all seeking after the pleasant things in life in some 
form or other ; and to deny any one of this privilege 
would be to wander back into Puritan narrowness. 
And I'm not sure but that the old Puritan stoic was 
sort 0' pleased with himself (If with nothing else) at 
times. 

'V/ell now to get down to " rock bottom " of ordi- 
nary lie as M. Q. would say. When you went over to 
Hamp. last Saturday night, Ted, did'nt you feel sort 
o' happy, down around the fifth rib, when Doris met 
you in the parlor with a pleasant smile. Suppose the 
maid should hare returned as you sat there twirling 
your cap, and told you Miss Doris was indisposed ; 
when you knew well enough If Jack's name had been 
sent up the illness would have rapidly disappeared. 
You'd have gone down the street in a mood that 
bodied III to the one who should cross your path. 
However Doris was good to you even though she may 
have wished you anywhere else. Did you ever stop 
to think that you weren't quite as pleasant to — as you 
might have been. 

It makes a "mighty heap of difference " how a 
fellow strokes the back of the world. The world In 
general may not worry over much about the fate of 
the stroker. but it makes a deal of difference with 
him. Some one said years ago, when I was younger. 



" give the world a kick and It growls at your heels, 

throw it a bone and it crouches at your feet," All the 

world loves a jolly fellow, one who Is bubbling over 

with fun. his presence seems to breathe new life and 

vigor into every atmosphere that he traverses, and It 

is always a pleasure to be near him. 

To be sure we are not all built on this plan but it Is 

given to all of us — the power to be at least pleasant 

on most If not all occasons. If we receive pleasure 

from the presence of others let us also be pleasant 

that we may be a pleasure to others. 

An Idler. 



THE LIBRARY. 

The Library has been the resort, In all ages, of 
scholars and students the world over. From the 
parchment manuscript to the edition de luxe the Li- 
brary has gathered within its walls the wealth of learn- 
ing of the centuries; and the student of to-day can- 
not learn its value too soon. The text-books used in 
the prescribed course j of study are In themselves In- 
sufficient for thorough and deep research, hence the 
lists for collateral reading found in each book. One 
author is unable to produce in his work all that has 
been said or written upon any particular subject, but 
he may express, an old truth In a new form, with 
perhaps a little more light on Its meaning and use ; 
and another work referred to In connection with the 
reading or study of that particular one may make a 
problem more plain and a description more clear. 
And it is the Library that strives to gather in one place 
all the important works of any and all subjects of 
Interest. 

The purpose of the college, or school of any kind, 
is not simply to pour Into the student knowledge that 
he may absorb like a sponge, without any effort of his 
own ; but rather to teach him how to think for him- 
self, how to discriminate between the useless and the 
useful. " Of the making of books there Is no end," a 
man satd hundreds of years before the art of printing 
was invented, as he looked with a prophetic eye 
through the ages to the nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
turies of the present age. And with the hundreds of 
new books published each month, together with the 
Infinite number of newspapers and periodicals of all 
descriptions, the mind is lost In the confusion of 
sounds as well as confusion of opinions. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



3» 



HORTICULTURAL SEMINAR. 

How to discriminate between the useless .and ^ th ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

useful, that is the great problem that confront every £M3 P ^ ^ HorticuUural Sem.na: 

m an, woman, and child. It is Here nth all op Wor^ ^ ^ ft ^ construcUon a, 
portunities favoring him. that the college 1 aRement f city parks. He advocated the Euro- 

must begin his work in that direction. A good booK manageme > k s as is practiced ,r 

Toi:^ most valuable things a ^ ™^ofc^ 

sess. but unless he learn its value ,t ,» » W-ce $q ^^ n dlfferen , 

him It has been stated so often that the Amer car number op ^^ the masses 

"ple live a life of hurry and rush from the cradle to par s of h^ » ^ ^ ^ e ^ 

the grave, that we have come to accept it as a act and s arr J ous lay groun ds. Tfc 

£ Lw how to pick the «-J**- ^ -1" baseball diamonds, M*"-' * 



To know now iu v ^ »~ ■•-- -. - , 

sacrificing its value or endangering . s own a e.y 
is an art obtained only by practice and "P" 1 ™^ 
To"**, bow ,0 read a boo, and absorb its v a , 



ran nave tne ucucm w. . 

tale out of basebali diamonds, wading ponds and th 
k deemed of prime importance while in plan.« 
a era effects are sougbt. Mr. Draper ta.dgrea 



„ bow ,0 read a boo, and ab sorb its vising „aU^ . » - ■ — ^^ m0&mA d W a,e 
qu a,i„es is an art Known to a rare ew .**££ «£ » „, lto p ,a„„„g o, sbruber, ,n tt 
one thing that students of life and ^^ ^^ Qf (he ^ 

niters college *»m-*J~* 



As he enters concgc ... ...- r - r 

, i(c this accomplishment, if you wish to ca, if wfe. 

stones .0 success. If he has ^ *• ^ ^ , owing officers were elected: Pres., 
ooo,, and how to obtain the wealth from it . w .1 and g & ^ ^^ . 



COLLEGE SENATE. 

The College Senate was reorganized Thursd. 
evInTn g Oc,.23w,, ht he,o 1 low.ngmembe,S w S.n 

__C. P. Halllgan, H. J. Franklin, M H. West a 
E . B. SneiUJunlors-J.W^Gregg^.^ 

B. Snei; 



rd ;7no7hrw^e hampered by a weight that de- 
bars him from the highest achievements. 



Nov. 5. 
Nou. 6. 



Nov. 7. 



Nov. 8. 
Nov. 9. 
Nov. 13. 



Nov. 
Nov. 



14. 
16, 



CALENDAR. 

Schubert male quartet under auspices of 

Union Lecture Course in town hall 8p. m. 

Y. M. C. A. meeting at 7-30 p. m. Topic. 

•• Decision of Character. ' 
Address before the Horticultural Seminar 
by Edmund C. Powell of Springfield 
at 7-45 P- m— Dancing class in 
hall at 7-15 p. m. 
Football game with Amherst on Pratt 

field. Game called at 3 p. m. 
Sunday chapel exercises at 9-15 a. m.— 

Y. M. C. A. meeting at 3-30 p. m. 
Missionary meeting of Y. M. C. A. at 

7-30 P. m. 
Informal dance In Drill hall at 5 p. m. 
Chapel exercises at 9-15 a. M.-Meetlng 

of Y. M. C A. at 3-30 p. m. 



P. Halllgan ; sec. and treas.J.V 
GeVgt was voted that men entitled to wear . 
M g should be debarred from playing in the ann, 

Sophomore-Freshmen football game. 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 

_The bookings at the Academy of Music. Nor 
ampton, for November are as follows: 
Nov 1 . Florodora (First Company). 
3. and week. King Dramatic Co. 

13, John Drew In " The Mummy and the r 
ming Bird." 

14, •• Human Hearts." 

17, " Hunting for Hawkins." 

18. Henrietta Crossman. 
22, (matinee and evening) Creatore and his Ba. 
26. The Penitent. 



Cornell is to have six or seven new bu, NP ° 
best and latest designs. The new Rocke fell er * * 
Physics and a hall for arts and humanities will 
cost over $250,000. 



A PASSING THOUGHT. 

WHY 1 DID NOT WRITE FOR THE COLLEGE SIGNAL. 
Out from the silence came a presence grand 
Standing one instant clear before my sight 
Trembling, I seized my pen and. dazed by light. 
Essayed with faithful but unequal hand 
To give obedience to the command 
Which said, as unto John of Patmos "write !" 
Even as 1 strove, the shining thing took flight. 
And left me with its fulness all unspanned. 
Abashed, and fallen from my exalted mood. 
1 saw the outline of a thought which has 
No touch of the D.vinity that sued 
For human utterance, but found alas ! 
Truly an accent blundering and rude— 
A jarring discord struck on sounding brass. 



SONS OF OLD MASS'CHUSETTS. 

Bay State's loyal sons are we. 
In her praise our song shall be. 

Till we make the welkin ring 

With our chorus as we sing 

With the tribute that we bring. 
Hoiyoke's hills prolong the strain, 
Echoing to the glad refrain ; 

And the gentlest winds proclaim 

Far and near thy peerless fame, 

Fraising e'er thine honored name. 
Massachusetts. 

CHORUS. 

Loyal sons of old Mass'chusetts, 

Faithful, sturdy sons and true, 

To our grand old Alma Mater 

Let our song resound anew. 
Cheer, boys, cheer for old Mass'chusetts. 
Give our college three times three ; 

Sons forever of the Bay State 
Loyal sons are we ! 

For thy colors, pure and bright. 
For thine own Maroon and White. 

Glorious victories we crave : 

Symbols of thy spirit brave, 

May they long in triumph wave. 
All thy sterling worth reveal, 
Grant us nobler, manlier real ; 

So though borne by Time's command 

Fir beyond thy sheltering hand. 

Still devoted sons we'll stand. 
Mass'chusetts. 

Howard L. Knight, '02. 



/Uhletic No-t^S- 



About one-third of the student enrollment of Bos- 
ton university are members of fraternities. 



FOOTBALL. 
Massachusetts. 5 ; Tufts. 0. 

Massachusetts met and defeated Tufts at Medford. 
Saturday, Oct. 25. The team put up an erratic 
game, but at times steadied down enough to show 
what they are capable of doing. Tufts played a 
better game than was expected of her, and at first 
seemed to have no trouble in making good gains. 

In the first half Massachusetts had the kick-off. and 
the kick was a poor one. Prince got the ball on 
Tufts 35-yard line, and advanced it five yards. 
Twice the Tufts men got first down before the visitors 
obtained the ball on a fumble. For a time the ball 
was in the hands.first of one team and then the other. 
McGlew of Tufts in the meanwhile making one run 
round right end for thirty yards. He lost the ball, but 
Massachusetts could not gain, and was forced to punt. 
Then the Tufts' backs aided by a quarterback kick 
and Knight's run of twenty yards had the ball on 
Massachusetts" one-yard line. Again, however, they 
fumbled , and with the ball in their possession the 
Massachusetts team showed some of the spirit so 
evident in the Dartmouth game. Almost every rush 
was a first down, and the ball was on Tufts' 25-yard 
line when time was called for the end of the first half. 

Score, 0-0. 

Tufts began the second half by kicking to Lewis. 
With the ball on their 20-yard line. Massachusetts 
used the same tactics that had been so successful 
during the latter part of the first half. Snell. Lewis. 
Munson and Halligan were in turn sent through the 
line for satisfactory gains until another fumble gave 
Tufts the ball on their 27-yard line. McGlew gained 
fifteen yards, and Tufts tried a quarterback kick. It 
failed however and again Massachusetts had the ball. 
Munson made ten yards through the line. Lewis went 
him ten better ; and the ball was on Tufts' 10-yard 
line. Here, however, the home team took a decided 
brace and the visitors gained hardly a yard in two 
downs. On the third down O'Hearn placed a pretty 
goal from the field. Score. Massachusetts 5, Tufts 0. 

For the rest of the game Massachusetts made but 
a poor showing, but the line held just enough at criti- 
cal points to save a touchdown. Twice Tufts tried 



a 










II 



I 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



33 




for a drop kick from the field but both trials were 
failures. The game was over with the ball In Tufts 
hands on Massachusetts 30-yard line. 

A large number of alumni were present at the 
game, several of the undergraduates were also there, 
and Massachusetts made quite a respectable showing 
in the rooting. The game as a whole was rather dis- 
appointing. Fumbling, which thus far this season 
had been conspicuous by its absence was altogether 
too frequent, the line which held so well against the 
plunges of the Dartmouth backs did not seem to be 
able to keep the Medford men from making holes in 
it; and altogether the team seemed to have taken 
a decided slump. The score : 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

O'Hearn. 1. e. 
Halligan, 1. t 



Massachusetts kicked off and Worcester 
ran the ball back to their opponents 35-yard line 
before time was called. The teams lined up as 
follows : 

WORCESTER TECH. 

Chickering. 1. e. 

Steiner, 1. t. 

Bliss, 1. g- 

Pelesier, c. 

Wheaton. r. g. 

Rankin, r. t. 

Burke, r. e. 

Spence, q. b. 

Rylands. 1. h. b. 

Merrill, r. h. b.. L h - D 

Emerson, f. b. 



massachusett: 
r. e., Whitak?: 
t.. Snell. Gardne: 
r. g., Frank!:: 
c. Pate 
1. g.. Craighei-. 
1. t.. Halliga- 
1. e.. Spur 
q. b., Ahear 
r. h. b.. Lew; 
, Shannon. Walr 



TUFTS. 

r. e., Dunham 

r. t., McMahon 

r. g., Chism 
Craighead, 1. g. c prince 

Patc *-, Cl 1. g., Galamean 

Frankhn. r. g. ^ t HurJey 

Snell. r. t. , Fay 

WMtaker.r.e. q . b.. McCarthy 

Ahea :, n ' q : b - u r. h. b.. Connell 

Conelly. I h. b. McC)ew MacRenzle 

Lewis, rhb. f.b.. Knight 

"^-Massachusetts 5. Tufts 0. Goal from fleld- 
O'Hearn. Umpire-Perry of Northwestern University. 
Gray of Brown. Timekeeper- Allen. Linesmen Gardner 
of M A. C. and Tarr of Tufts. Time-20 minute halves. 



f. b., Munsc: 
Score-Tech 6. Massachusetts 0. Touchdown-Emerso: 
Goal from touchdown-Rylands. Umpire and referee- 
Smith and Chaffin alternated. Time-20minute halves. 




Worcester Tech., 6 ; Massachutetts, 0. 
Worcester Tech. won from Massachusetts on the 
campus last Saturday. This is the first game an M 
A. C. football team has lost on the home grounds for 

four years. 

In the first half Massachusetts showed herself much 
superior to their opponents both in offense and de- 
fense Fumbles, however, were frequent, and the 
failure to make at least one touchdown can be at- 
tributed to this cause alone. 

In the second half. Worcester had the kick-off. 
Snell caught the ball and advanced about twenty 
yards On the very first play, however, Massachu- 
setts fumbled, and it was Tech's ball on the home 
team's 40-yard line. Worcester bucked the line for 
short gains all the way down the field. On their two- 
yard line Massachusetts held for two downs, but on 
the third Emerson was sent through for a touchdown. 
Rylands kicked the goal. Score. Tech 6. Massachu- 



1 N MEMORY OE JOHN SHERMAN WEST. MASSACHUSETTS AG, 

cultural College, 1890. 

Whereas. Divine Providence has taken from us our ho: 
ored and beloved brother. John S. West and 

Mews, We have been deeply moved by our mutual ta 
and the bereavement of his family and friends, be tt ther. 

l0X Resolved, That we, the Amherst chapter of the Q T. 
fraternity, do extend to the afflicted family and friends, c. 
heartfelt sympathy, and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to 
bereaved family, a copy be inscribed In the archives of 
fraternity, and copies be sent to The College Signal a 

the Amherst Record for publication. remittee 

D. Nelson West. ) Committee 

H.J.Franklin, \ Jor the 

William E. Tottingham. ) 



Collect N°**S- 






Riggedy rick 
Co-ed ee ick 

Special two year naughty-four 
Massachusetts. 
-Connely, '06. is suffering with an attack 
appendcitis. 

—The football season closes with the Amher 
game next Saturday. 



A large delegation from the Botanic club of 
ringfield lately visited the college grounds, 
— G. E. O'Hearn, who was laid off last week on 
count of injuries in the head, has again joined the 
uad. 

—From the present outlook It seems as though the 
reshmen had more than an even chance of winning 
ie class football game. 

| —Professor Waugh spoke before the New Hamp- 
■lire State Horticultural society at Durham, N. H. 
k Oct. 24. his subject being plum culture. 

I The Fraternity Conference has been organized 

at follows : G. L. Barrus, president ; E. G. Proulx. 
vice-president ; N. L. Monahan, secretary and 
treasurer. 

^__H. C. Bowen, '03, who had the muscles of his 
leg broken two weeks ago while playing foot ball has 
gone home, for a few weeks. He is reported as 
doing well. 

|— The special two-year class of 1 904 have elected 
the following officers: President, Miss Hunt; secre- 
tary and treasurer, Miss Hyde ; class captain, Miss 
Hyde; pingpong captain, Miss Hunt. 
■ —The first of a series of informal dances will be 
held in tne Dri'u Hall Friday evening at 5 o'clock. If 
these dances prove a success they will be held at 
Intervals of two or three weeks all winter. 
• 'At a meeting of the Fraternity Conference held 
last week N. F. Monahan was chosen as chairman of 
a committee of five to take charge of the informal 
dances, the other four men to be appointed by the 
chairman, one from each fraternity. The men 
appointed are : D. G. K., C. H. Tinkham ; * 2 K, E. 
G. Proulx ; C. S. C, M. F. Ahearn ; Q. T. V., M. H. 
West. 

'ffL- Excepting the lights which are attached to the 
buildings there is not a single light about the college 
walks and grounds. While we know it is intended to 
put an extensive system of lights around the walks at 
a later date, there ought to be a few temporary ones 
placed in advantageous positions, especially on the 
board walk between the colleges and the boarding 
house. 

jfc— The new schedule of drill, necessary to meet the 
requirements of General Order No. 94 of the War 
Department, has been arranged as follows: On Mon- 



days, Tuesdays and Thursdays three Seniors, four Jun 
iors. five Sophomores and six Freshmen will be detailed 
for guard duty. The rest of the battalion will have 
company and battalion drill as usual. On Fridays the 
guard detail alone will report at 3-30 for an hour's 
drill, while on Saturday the demerit men will be 
required to do guard duty. All guard details will be 
made by classes irrespective of rank. 



Alumni. 



75.— In the Boston Globe of Aug. 30, 1902. there 
appeared a photograph and a short account of the 
work of Dr. John F. Winchester of Lawrence. Dr. 
Winchester is president of the American Veterinary 
Medical association whose membership extends to all 
parts of the American continent, both north and 
south. He as taken a deep interest In the business 
of the association ever since he became a member. 
He has served on many important committees and 
was vice president for two years before he was elected 
president. He is a well known veterinary surgeon of 
Lawrence and vicinity and he has received the con- 
gratulations of many friends on being honored with 
this position. Dr. Winchester is a native of Lynn, 
and was born Aug. 5, 1855. When he was 10 years 
old, his parents removed with him to Peabody and he 
obtained his preliminary education In the public 
schools, graduating from the high school. He con- 
tinued his studies In this college graduating in 1875, 
and afterwards taking a post-graduate course in chem- 
istry and veterinary. Later he took a course In the 
American Veterinary college In New York and grad- 
uated in February. 1878. In the same year he went 
to Lawrence and has made his home there since. 
Dr. Winchester is acknowledged to be one of the 
most skillful veterinarians in the eastern states, an 
authority on all diseases of animals and his judgment 
is sought in difficult cases, far and wide. He lectured 
at this college in 1878, 79. '80. '81 and later he 
lectured in the New Hampshire State College at 
Durham, N. H. Dr. Winchester was president of 
the Massachusetts Veterinary association two years 
and was a member of the Massachusetts Catttle Com- 
mission for four years. He has been local Inspector 
of animals since 1892. He Is an honorary member 
of the Maryland Veterinary association. He is the 









34 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



author of a number of books on subjects pertaining 
to his profession and at nearly every meeting of the 
association he reads some paper of interest and value 
to the members. Dr. Winchester is a 32d degree 
mason, being a member of Phoencian Lodge, Nit. 
Sinai Royal Arch Chapter. Lawrence Council, Royal 
and Select Masters and Bethany Commandery, 
Knights Templar, all of Lawrence and of the higher 
degree organization in Lowell and Boston. He is 
also a popular member of Lawrence Lodge of Elks 
and of the Home Club. Dr. Winchester gave a 
very able address before the American Veterinary 
Medical association at its 39th annual meeting held 
in Minneapolis, Minn., Sept. 2. 1902, 

79 _C. O. Lovell is working to reorganize the 
Lovell Dry Plate Co., of New Rochelle. N.Y., which 
has been suffering some financial embarrassment 
during the last few months. This company, of which 
Mr. Lovell was president, was putting a fine line of 
photographic goods onto the market up to the time 
when it suspended operations. 



Spring^Clothes. 



Just the sorts that yotinsi men will appreciate. 
There's a collection here that absolutely cannot 
be found elsewhere in Western New England. 
Will you come and see it? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 

Haynes & Co., 

A /ways Reliable. 



SriUNGHIKLD, 



Ma> 




PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 

New York 

Central 

Lines 



DAILTf SERVICE. 



THROUGH COACHES 

BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



SLEEPING CARS 



DINING CARS 



EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 

TO AMD FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER, 



RKA1> DOWII. 
Ml A.M. Ml F.M. 

!l.50 " 6.45 " 
10.00 '« fi.iW " 
10.50 " 8.01 " 
11.50 " 3.03 " 



A8 FOLLOWS 

It. Amherst 
nr. rainier 
lv. Palmer 
nr. Worcester 
ar. Boston 



RKAl) UP. 

ar. Ml am. 8.3fir.M. 
lv.s.20 " Ml " 
ar.73« " 7* ; " 
lv. it.25 '* <un " 
lv.5.00 " 5.00 " 



To ALBANY, 
To BUFFALO, 
To CHICAGO, 
To CINCINNATI, 
To DETROIT, 
To ST. LOUIS, 



Through the 
Famous . . . 



9 Trains 
8 Trains 
7 Trains 
3 Trains 
5 Trains 
3 Trains 



Berkshire 

hills . . . 

AND TIIK 

fllbanp <iatcu>ap, 

Which it alwaya Open. 



■»!».»« laf*^,*^ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




78. Sanford D. Foot and Carrie Kitchen Von 

jrnuth were married in New York, Oct. 30. 
'82.— C. S. Plumb, Professor of Animal Hus- 
^ndry, Ohio State University. Address, 10 West 
sventh Ave., Columbus, O. 

'95. — G. A. Billings has accepted a position as land- 
ipe gardener at Richmond Beach Park, Staten 
land. The park is owned by Chas. M. Schwab. 
Esident of the steel trust and is to be used for the 
^nefit of the poor children of New York. Mr. Bll 
gs address is, Huguenot Park, Staten Island. 
•96. — Erford W. Poole was married to Miss Ger- 
|dy C. Howes at Fall River, Oct. 23. The cere- 
mony was performed by Rev. W. J. Renolds. Mr. 
and Mrs. Poole will be at home, New Bedford, after 
Nov, 8. 

»96. — Mr. Merle Edgar Sellew and Miss Mary 
Frost McGlauflin were married at Waterhouse, 
Aug. 28. 

Bp7. — James L.Bartlett is in charge of the Weather 
Bureau at Escanaba. Mich. 

■97. — P. H. Smith is engaged in sampling concen- 
trated foodstuffs in different sections of Massachusetts. 
■'00. — James F. Lewis has a position in the Carew 
Cotton Gin Co's. machine shop at East Bridgewater. 
■oi. — N, J. Hunting has lately been making tests 
of animals at the farms of N. I. Bowditch, F. L. 
Ames, and C. I. Hood. 

Bd2.— F. R. Church is employed in testing animals 
: Woodside farm, Princeton. 



I irt{rcoH{gi& a te. 



Life for freshmen is (sweet) at Mt. Holyoke. 

Every class gives them a reception with refreshments. 

%"he fire department of Northampton was called 

out on the night of Oct. 28, to a small fire in College 

Hall at Smith. The damage was slight. 

•The subject of the Harvard-Princeton debate is: 
Resolved, That whenever in the event of continued 
domestic violence, lives and property are not ade- 
quately protected, it is for the public good that the 
Jldent should have the power to afford protection 
out application to the state for federal aid. 



me HEIR 

to theFA'RML 



\i 



Will make thoold farm pay 
If In' fa 1 ins 1I10 farm in the 
modern way. 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

Uaught by Mail. 

A thorough and practical COWM, 
under the direct charge of Win. r. 
Brooke, l'li. D.. (MaaaachuMtta Ai:- 
ricultural College ), <>iir eoorM M 
baaed on "Brooke 1 Agriculture ;" it 
tr< itsofaoila, planta, tillage, draln- 
age.in iiiatimi. manures, fn liUsali in, 
crop rotation and everything per« 
tuning to moBer-oaklng. on thu 
farm, Teat booki (3 vnlmnua, MOO 
.. 300 illustrations) free 10 stu- 
ili nt*. S' md f» 3d pa(fl book <lo- 
scriliing course in full. 

Home 

Correspondence 
.Schools, 

Springfield. MtiJj. 
other O ut at i Beatoasa, Shorthand. 
Pcamaashlp. Typewriting. Mrnuu 

count, flu f'lrU'iiiiii'i'nwrtlll' ate, 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGElt, 

200 Broadway, New Yohk. 

Club and College Pins and Kings, 
tiold and Silver Medals. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jawelry. 



IP TO THE 



i) 



IN 



MEN'S FINE SHOES, 
The Northampton Shoe Go, 



88 Main St., 



NOKTHAMFTON, Ma8*. 



"W. 











36 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



At a meeting of the executive committee of the 
Intercollegiate Association of Amateur Athletes of 
America, held at the Fifth Avenue hotel In New York 
a few days ago. it was decided that W. A. Shick. Jr., 
Harvard. 1905. was ineligible to compete in the in- 
tercollegiate championship meet last spring. This 
carries with it the decision that the points won by 
Shick for Harvard cannot be counted for that univer- 
sity, thus giving the championship to Yale. The 
omission of the points to Harpard gives the follow- 
ing scores of the leading colleges: Yale 33. Har- 
vard 29, Princeton 27. 

Following are the scores to 
Eastern calleges : 



date of the leading 



Yale 

Harvard, 

Princeton, 

Penn. 

Columbia, 

Carlisle, 

Syracuse, 

Amherst, 

Wesleyan. 

West Point, 

Massachusetts, 

Annapolis, 

Brown, 

Williams, 



215 
157 
159 
134 
178 
146 
119 
90 
55 
56 
40 
35 
25 
23 



OPP. 

12 
12 

5 
41 
38 
47 
41 
55 
104 
20 

12 
40 
28 
131 



SO YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

metal notte*. without charge, In the 

Scientific American. 

A handsometr Illustrated weeklr. ^»'«?f t 1 gf , i ; 

MUNN & Co. 36,Bro,d "' New York 

m Bri"oh Offloe7« V BL, WMhlMton. D. C. 




Write a Note 

to Johnson 

when you want a book, a picture, some stationery 
or anything else worth huviug. 

Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AMD ART DEALER, 

Springfield, Mass. 



313-315 Main St., 




HE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



xm. 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 19. 1902 



NO. 4 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
■dent, and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communication, should be addressed . Collms Signal Amh.rst. Mass. The S I.omm will be 
> all .ubscrlbers until it. discontinuance I. erdered and arrear. are paid. Subscriber, who do not receive the.r paper regularly are requested to 
the Business Manager. , 



HJ&KRY ADAMS, 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903. Editor-in Chief. 

WILLIAM ETHERINCTON ALLEN. 1903, Business Manager. 

HOWARD MORCAN WHITE. 1904. Assistant Business Manager. 
AE1L FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903. College Note.. HENRY JAMES FRANKLIN, 1903, Alumni Notes. 

RICHARD HENDR.E ROBERTSON. 1903. FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. .904. Athletics. 

ft RAYMOND RAYMOTH. 1904. Department Notes. ARTHUR LEE PECK. 1904. Interco'leglate. 

OEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. .905. * HERBERT HAROLD COODENOUGH. .905. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASJ 




Term*, fl.OQ per year In adoance. "Single Coploo, 10c Pot* 8* °»f M« °« ""«**" ***• «" a Canada, Me. artra. 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 



FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIUAUS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES. EISHINC TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols. Sporting and Springfield lit* 
Sunday and night call, responded to at residence, first doc 
west of Chase's Block. 



M. C A. 

01 Association, 
I Boarding Club. 
-Room Association, 

H __ 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottlngham, Pres. Athletic Association, 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. Base- Ball Association. 

C. P. Halllgan. Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

R. H. Robertson, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
J. C. Cook, Manager. 
A. L. Peck. Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 




Entered as »ecend-cla»» matter, Pest Office at Amher.t. 



Edrt&ri&ls. 



HOTEL HENKING, 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Klrst Class Lunch. Rooms • l.Man.l ■»*««•! * lth ■* 
• ISO to $4.00. Double, S4.50; with Butli, $3.00. 

H. C. HBNKINO «V OO. 
IS Lyman St., opp.»lf Union litpot. SprinafUld, Jtf««. 
Telephone, 4A9-3. 



The practice of " going on strike" seems to be both 
popular and contagious and college students seem to 
be no more Immune to It than are the industrial classes. 
But a few weeks since about one thousand students in 
the Michigan Agricultural college went on strike 
because of the suspension of some of their fellows 
for tome trifling misdemeanor and on Nov. 14 five 
hundred students of University of Colorado voted to 
attend no recitations during the quarter-centennial 
celebration In progress at Boulder. We would sug 
gest that an Intercollegiate faculty combine be formed 
that these strikes may be fought In a systematic 
manner. 



. - — HAfllflT Near Union Statin; 

COOLEY'S HOTEL,, im »....-. >!»■• 

HBNKY K. MAK8H, Proprietor. 

All the modern conveniences. First class accou 
motlations for 300 guests. 

RESTAURANT ON THB EUROPEAN PLAN. 



We sincerely regret that any unpleasantness has 
arisen over the prospective sophomore-freshmen foot- 
ball feme. The question of playing " varsity " men 
Is ever a cause for ill feeling but If the greatest fair- 
nese to to be shown to both classes It seems mani- 



festly right that men entitled to the M should be 
excluded from class contests. Again, although It is 
but natural that each class should endeavor to do all 
In its power to bring victories to Itself, class interests 
should In every case give way to college Interests. In 
postponing the sophomore-freshman game the senate 
exercised its prerogative In behalf of college Interests 
and by so doing brought upon itself as perhaps was but 
natural, the charge of partiality. We believe this 
charge to be erroneous and that it will be so consid- 
ered by every liberal minded underclassman. 



The football season of 1902 Is a thing of the past. 
Compared with last year's highly successful season it 
would seem at first glance that the team sent out of 
the college this year has. been greatly Inferior to that 
of last year. Ending as the season did with defeat at 
the hands of our neighbors on the hill a feeling of 
disappointment has been prevalent about college. It 
would seem however that the three defeats which we 
have suffered should not cause lamentation when we 
consider from a broad standpoint just what our team 




38 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



39 







has done. Hard, consistant practice and faithful train- 
ing has marked the entire season. Coach Jennings 
has been supported by his men in a way which reflects 
the upmost credit to the college. Our defeats have 
only illustrated the fortunes of football. Every team 
has its "ups and downs." Every team has Its mis- 
fortunes and its " slumps " at critical moments. If a 
team is not consistent in its practice, and plays a loose 
half hearted game or if it goes upon the field to win 
by foul play it is then that it has reason to be censured 
but we can state with pride that such a state of cir- 
cumstances has not marked the work of the team sent 
out by Massachusetts. In the schedule which our 
manager arranged we had every reason to expect 
defeat yet with the exception of the games with Tufts 
University and W. P. I. In which we showed unexcu- 
sible weakness, we have shown that, although vitally 
handicapped by the loss of men, we were equal to our 
opponents in every department of the game. We 
have demonstrated that with a student body number- 
ing less than 150 men and with a squad of but 19 
players that a team could be placed upon the field 
which would command respect from the largest colleges 
In New England. In no better way has this fact been 
demonstrated than by the highly respectful treatment 
which we have received at the hands of these col- 
leges and by the ease with which our schedules are 
arranged from year no year. To the men who have 
so steadfastly strove for the honor of Massachuaetts 
during the past two months the college as a whole owes 
a debt of gratitude and to those men the Sicnal offers 
its congratulations. 



A GLIMPSE OF NATAL. 

If possible let your imaginations go with me on a 
journey to a far off land where the jeweled Southern 
Cross shines In sparkling splendor in the cloudless 
blue of Natal's bright sky. But before our minds 
have wandered far towards the land to which they 
have turned, let us go over briefly, the historic facts 
which time has chronicled during the years gone by. 

On Christmas-day in the year 1497. but five years 
after the discovery of America, Vasco de Gama 
sailed around the Bluff, which forms the harbor of 
the present city, Durban, the only anchorage of Natal, 
and claimed the land for Portugal. But the Portu- 
guese did nothing to colonize the country, so two 



hundred years later, we find the Dutch of the Cap: 
purchasing the land from a native chief. The Dutc 
as the Portuguese did nothing to develope their new! 
acquired property. Not until 1825 was any Europea 
settlement of any kind established, when some Eng 
lish adventurers and hunters, attracted by the myst 
cal and somewhat elaborate tales of sailors, entere: 
the country and traded for Ivory and game, with nj 
Zulu king, Chaka. Ten years later Durban was la: 
out. and in 1848 Natal was made a British colon, 
ruled by a Lieutenant-Governor appointed by th> 
crown. From this time on the colony began to gro. 
In England emigration was urged upon the peop 
with satisfactory results. The great problem th; 
now confronted the new people was how to arrang 
things satisfactorily with the native tribes aroun 
them. The chief menace, that of the Zulu mllitar 
power hung like a dark and forboding cloud on th 
horizon. Ever and a-non low rumblings could b 
heard in the distance, as of some mighty power he> 
in check and but awaiting a chance to wreak Its ver 
geance. At last, In 1879, the storm broke, for a It' 
tie while raging fiercely In the intensity of its pent t 
fury, and then, subsiding, with nothing but its men- 
ory left. The colonial government provided re 
serves for the natives, but did little to Interfere wi' 
the customs of the Zulu people, placing little restrai- 
upon them. The tribal system was continued b. 
each chief was held responsible for the actions of h 
people. In 1892 Natal was granted by the crown th 
privileges of responsible government. This was 
great step In advance and has meant much In th 
progress of the colony. The last event of note ws 
that of the Boer war. Many brave men died in th: 
cause they believed to be right. Nothing need c 
told of the war. All have read of it In the papers an 
periodicals that fill our shelves and bookcases. 

With the hasty review of the few facts which ■ 
have, let us now proceed on the journey we ha* 
commenced. 

After a presumably comfortable voyage, we fin: 
ourselves in Durban. The custom house Is safe 
passed, baggage attended to, and then we are ready 
do a little sight-seeing. We turn down West stre; 
the principle thorougfare of this city of twenty-seve 
thousand people and are somewhat surprised to $'-■ 
where a few years before were only huts and san: 



dunes, the stately buildings that line each side, the 
street cars, the fashionably dressed people passing by, 
and the many different signs of advance everywhere. 
But what claims our attention the most are the " kaf- 
flrs" and "coolies." The former dark brown or 
black men of splendid physique are seen drawing 
jlnrikishas in bright liveries. Some we are told are 
I kitchen boys " while others we can see are raw- 
kaffir.,, straight from the kraal. These stand on the 
sidewalks, gazing into the shop- windows at the white 
man's goods, wonder and awe printed on every feat- 
ure, entirely unconclous of our curious scrutiny and 
not to be suppressed laughter at their dress. And 
such dress! It would be hard for the makeup artist 
of the vaudeville stage to imitate it. Law compells 
the natives to wear European dress in the towns on 
the government roads, so the combinations contrived 
are fantastical to say the least. The ignorant fellows 
are feen with trousers inside out, and backside front. 
ladles' jackets and bonnets -on or partly so. and many 
other ridiculous forms of dress. The whole effect is 
heightened with the adornment of the paint and beads 

fir savagery. We learn, however, that these 
men make good servants and are only undesira- 
that they will never stay long in service. The 
coolies on the other hand are a wiry people of me- 
dium height and vary from a dark brown to the color 
of the Anglo-Saxon. A large number are Indentured 
servants working for Europeans, but in the cites they 
are as a class venders, and their shrill cries and 
Oriental costuming attract us to them and persuade 
us to spend a "bob" or two, on some plantains and 
loquats. As we have time we haggle over the price 
for half an hour ; all wise persons do in Natal. The 
rest of our time in Durban is spent in visiting the 
parka, the museum and the Boerea. 

We now decide to take a coast survey of the coun- 
try. We take the train for Stanger, a town about 
seventy miles northeast of Durban. As the train 
takes about seven hours on the way, we have plenty 
of time to see the country. We pass by large sugar- 
cane fields which are planted in the aluvial soil 
of the river-banks. On higher ground are tea 
and coffee plantations, while around the one-story 
houses of the colonists are fruit trees of many kinds. 
LucJous tropical fruits they are. which tantalize our 
senses as we move farther away. We pass over 



many rivers whose swift, shallow and treacherous 
waters are lined with reeds among which the Iguanas 
and other reptiles, most of which are harmful, make 
their nests. Once in a while we pass close enough 
to the shore to see the sands-bars which block the 
mouths of most the Natal streams ; to see the coast 
with its rocks and sand against which the deep blue 
waves of the Indian Ocean hurl themselves In tower- 
ering masses in a vain endeavor to break their bounds. 
Moving on we pass heavily loaded wagons with nine 
and ten yoke of oxen straining at the chain, to the 
harsh cries of the driver and crack of the whip. 
Twenty-four miles a day we are told, is good travelling 
for an ox team. The bush country around us is 
strange to us with its clumps of thick vegetation here 
and ther;. while the solitary cactus trees seem to 
sund like sentinels over the brown and seared hills. 
Now we are in Stanger, where we stay a few hours, 
looking at the stone fort converted into the county 
prison, after which we make arrangements to "do " 
the hills on horse-back. 

ITo be continued] 



HOW INSECTS ARE CLOTHED. 

What a diversity of vestment does a traveler find 
among tht different races of men as he goes from 
country to country and comes in contact with the 
various fads and fashions of the peoples of earth ! In 
the way of foot wear he finds a various assortment from 
the sandals of the Hindoo to the moccasins of the 
Indian or the shining patent leather boots of the tony 
Englishman. Headgear, what confusion ! Here is the 
turban of the bloody Turk and there a sleek black 
derby ; here the rough seal-skin cap of the Esquimau 
and there the light straw hat of your sporty young man 
at the sea shore. And between these extremities, 
what variety! Behold It as they pass : your sedate, 
civilized Englishman with conventional dress of dark 
coat and gray trousers, your Arab with his shalvars, 
your canny Scotchman in short kilts. 

And it is not necessary to compare different peoples 
and nations to find marked difference In clothing. 
Man's and woman's clothing is. in nearly every nation 
and tribe, absolutely unlike and different members of 
the same family even are obliged to make their hablla- 
ments conform to the necessities of their various 
occupations. 




4« 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 












But, great as Is this variety, there are little beings 
all about us which, to those who study them, are a con- 
tinual source of astonishment in this respect as they 
are In many others. The Insects are not even out 
classed by the birds In the beauty or variety of their 
vestments. And this is by no means a surprising fact 
when we remember that they comprise In numbers 
more than four-fifths of the animal kingdom. As with 
men, insect habiliments vary not only In different 
tribes, genera, and species but even in the same species, 
there are variations according to individual and sex. 
And It not infrequently happens that the female has the 
gayer covering. 

In the human family clothing has three principal 
uses. In the first place it serves as a protection to 
the body; second, as adornment ; and third, as a moral 
necessity. The uses of the clothing of insects may 
also be classed under three main heads : first protection, 
second adornment, and third special uses. By far the 
most important of these three uses, however. Is 
the first, namely, protection. We might therefore, 
without great error, speak of the clothing of Insects as 
their armature. 

Nearly all insects have an armature of some kind. 
Those which have the least are usually, like the May- 
flies, soft-bodied and short-lived. In Insects with a 
complete metamorphests, many of the larvae even are 
provided with armatures. The common Salt Marsh 
caterpillar and the Isabella Tiger Moth caterpillar are 
striking examples of this. In some larvae the armature 
which usually consists of spines, has become so 
developed as a protective organ as to be almost a 
weapon of offense. As an example of this state of 
affairs the lo Moth caterpillar is the most prominent, 
the prick of the spines of which is venemous. These 
poisonous spines and hairs of various caterpillars have 
a special structure. It Is very much like that found in 
the hairs of the feet of flies and In the tenet hairs of 
the feet of Callembola. Here the hairs are fine, 
hollow setae from which exude perhaps through pore 
canals of extreme fineness, droplets of a clear watery 
or plasmalike sticky fluid. As found in the feet, they 
serve to give out a sticky fluid enabling the Insect to 
walk on smooth surfaces. The poisonous spines of 
caterpillars are hollow and filled with a poisonous 
secretion formed In specialized hypodermal cells 
situated near the base of the spine. The spines of 



some larvae are barbed and easily detached from the 
body and, If they come In contact with a persons skin 
have the power of burrowing underneath and causing 
great Irritation. The Brown Tall Moth caterpillar and j 
certain of the limacodid larvae may be cited as 
examples of this. 

In adult Insects there are four general kinds 0' 
armature which, of course, are greatly varied accord 
ing to order, tribe, genus, and species. Probably the 
most common form of Insect armature met with Is 
made up of setae, hairs, or bristles. As in worms, the 
hairs of Insects are processes oi the cuticle arising 
from certain of the hypodermal cells. They arise 
either from a ring-like pit or from a minute tubercle. 
While the setae are usually simple there are notable 
exceptions. The hairs of most bees, for Instance, are 
nearly all either splnulose. plumose, or twisted. The 
use of these modified hairs in the bees Is evident when 
we remember that, as these Insects walk over flowers 
the pollen grains adhere to the vestlture. 

The second kind of insect armor, while not clothing 
in any strict sense of the word Is, nevertheless, a ven 
efficient means of protection. It consists of the hard 
horny integument of the body which, In some Insects 
is greatly thickened. This kind of Insect clothing has 
Its greatest development among the beetles and the 
true bugs. It Is usually combined more or less wit: 
one or another of the other kinds of insect vestmeni 
This thickened Integument forms a protecting coat fc: 
the insect which In comparison is fully as strong as th: 
armor of the armadillo. 

The third kind of Insect clothing is made up of broa: 
scales. They are usually borne on the integument 
overlapping and more or less in rows like the shingle: 
on a roof. This kind of armature Is found only amon[ 
the butterflies, moths, caddlce flies, snout beetles, an: 
some mosquitoes. In very rare cases the hairs o 
caterpillars are flattened and scale like and this passage 
in the same insect of cylindrical hairs Into flattene: 
scale like ones shows that the scales are only modifie: 
hairs. In the butterflies and moths It Is the structure 
of these scales that gives the Insects their brilliant an: 
beautiful colors. In this case the scales are crossed b ; 
many fine lines or impressions close to each othe- 
The butterflies and moths use this covering as a protec 
Hon in many curious ways. It Is. of course, a natural! 
direct protection to the body, but the Indirect uses I 



=- 

which it 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



4« 



j it is put are very interesting. The scales of 
|e butterflies and moths closely resemble in color 
the bark or foliage of the plants on which they feed.and 
In this way the insects by mimicry escape the notice 
of many a hungry bird. 

A very interesting case of mimicry for protection 
is that of the Viceroy butterfly (Basilarchia archippus) 
which so closely resembles In general appearance the 
Monarch butterfly (Anosia plexippus). The butterflies 
of the subfamily to which the Monarch belongs are 
exempt from the attacks of birds. This Is due to the 
possession by these butterflies of certain modified 
scales called androconia which are borne on the wings 
and which gives off a disagreeable odor. With such 
an odor the conspicuous coloring of the butterflies Is 
protective, the birds soon learning that such butter- 
filet are not fit for food. These birds will naturally 
lee« undisturbed any other butterflies that resemble 
the III smelling ones, even though they do not possess 
a similar odor. According to the theory of natural 
selection these resemblances have been produced as 
follows. In the case of a variable species that is 
unprotected by any disagreeable quality, any variation 
toward a protected species will tend to preserve the 
life of the individual possessing It. And in turn such 
offspring of these Individuals as still more nearly 
reatinble the protected species will be most likely to 
be preserved. The continued action of this natural 
selection will result in producing a species that closely 
resembles the protected one, even though It may be 
very different structurally from the one It mimics. 
Thla mimicry is largely accomplished by the color 
produced by the striations of the scales. 

Many instances of unconscious mimicry of this kind 
are known. They are especially abundant in the 
tropics where the foul-smelling Heliconinae are most 
lant. 

The scales of some butterflies and moths are 
_. kable In that they have the power of changing 
color like changeable silk. 

The fourth kind of insect clothing Is made up of the 
scales of Cocclds and the pupa cases and cocoons of 
many Insects with a complete metamorphests. This, 
in the strict sense of the word. Is more truly clothing 
thaft any of the other kinds. In this kind of insect 
clothing there are many forms which are of direct 
economic importance to man. Among them may be 



cited : the silk of the Silk Worm (Bombyx mori) the 
stick lac of Casteria lacca, and the China wax of Pela. 

The members of the group Orthesia are remarkable 
for the calcareous secretion with which the body Is 
clothed. 

Insects are curious creatures and they are as varied 
as they are curious. This paper has aimed to give a 
few of the interesting facts which have been learned 
about their costumes, but what a myriad of known 
facts there are and how many there are yet to learn. 

H. J. Franklin, 



Obsfrtfationsp$ S) C onc ' il s" ,on S 

The Observer has often had it In mind to speak 
about the Co-eds. Last year the editor of the Index 
thought the subject of enough importance to devote 
an editorial to the girls when there were only half as 
many In college as there are now. Therefore under 
present conditions there is no reason why the Signal 
should not give some of its space to their merits and 
demerits. Even yet the question Is not a serious 
one ; but If the present raUo of increase continues it 
will only be a matter of about eight years before there 
will be more Co-eds than Eds. Think what a scor- 
ing the 1903 editor will have to stand up under when 
the editoresses of the 1912 Index write an answer to 
his article of last year. Think of the encomiums that 
will be heaped upon the devoted heads of those two 
heroines who suffered such martyrdom that they 
might prove to their downtrodden sisters that these 
doors as well as those of M. I. T.. the penitentiary, 
and other state Institutions are open to them. Think 
of It and tremble, ye who have scorned the co-ed. 
Think of it and cheer up, ye who are co-eds, for I say 
unto you that the way of the trangressor Is hard only 
when the trangressors are few. Your reward will 
come when your tribe has increased. 

As your friend however,— please remember when 
you are all powerful that the Observer was always 
your friend— a word of advice might help the thing 
along. The word in a word Is the word ' Don't: 
Don't get angry If you are pointed out as curiosities. 
It's great fun to be rubbered at if you once get used 

to it. 

Don't smoke cigarettes around the professors. 



_ I 



*>f 







." 













42 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



43 



They smoke themselves when they can " burn a cig." 
Don't wear a " tarn " unless you want to be taken 

for an Amherst Senior. 

Don't try to jump down a P. G's throat when he 

takes you to a dance. It might be disagreeable to 

the P. G. 

Don't study. You put the profs, wise that every- 
body else is loafing. 

Don't do anything. 

Don't do nothing. 

Don't do it. 

Don't. 

And the Observer will bet a V that the dear girls 

say " why not ? " 



A TROLLY 



AMHERST TO 




TRIP FROM 
BOSTON. 

Without doubt there are many people, natives of 
the Bay State, who have not the least conception of 
the beauty of Massachusetts. 

There is no better way to get an idea of what she 
consists than to go over the rolling country from Am- 
herst to Boston on an electric car. The trip takes 
about fifteen hours, but the time is well spent. 

The majority of us know the beautiful ride from 
Amherst to South Hadley via the •• Notch " and 
thence to Holyoke and Springfield. Owing to the 
perfecting of the line from the latter city east, one 
can board a car there for Ware, going through the 
town of Palmer. From Palmer to Ware there is a 
combination of highway and pasture-land along which 
fast time is made as there are but few stops. One 
place here which especially attracts the eye. is For- 
est Lake which is a popular picnic ground.. 

After leaving Ware one might almost say that civ- 
ilization is left behind, so wild is the country. Soon 
after leaving the town a long climb is begun which 
ends in a tableland. From the summit can be seen 
the little town of Gilbertville about four miles to the 
North nestled in the valley and looking like a collec- 
tion of miniature buildings. This section of the state 
is the highest through which we pass on our trip. 
West Brookfield is the next town, and here we change 
cars. West Brookfield is a pretty place, the most 
prominent feature perhaps being the long rows of 
trees lining both sides of the broad, and level streets. 
From here to Spencer is a repetition of the previous 



section of the journey save that here begins the stats 

road, part of that great system which is doing so mur 

good not only to pleasure seekers but the general put 

lie. In entering Spencer one has a great desire: 

get out and help the car up the steep incline : 

which is situated the main street of the town. Nc; 

the top its destination is reached, and here one boar: 

the car for Worcester which is an immense doubi: 

trucked machine. Leicester is passed through : 

the sixteen mile ride to Worcester which is made In 

little over an hour, thus showing the wonderful spe- 

of the cars. 

If one feels that he can spare a half to three-qua: 
ers of an hour when he gets to Worcester, he will fa 
well paid for his time. One of the most noticeab 
features of this city is its cleanliness. The car : 
Northboro is taken at the corner near City Hall a; 
the ride is made in the same way and In about f 
same time as that just mentioned. At Northbc 
one takes a car for South Framingham and on a: 
val at the latter, one feels as If he were nearly horr 
as it is only twenty miles to Boston, but he discov: 
later that they are a long twenty miles. It is a CM 
paratively short ride to Natick and from there ti 
routes are open to Boston, one by way of the Ne. 
ton. the other by Needham and West Roxbury. T 
former is by far the pleasanter and shorter. At one 
the Newtons the last change is made, as cars 1 
direct to Park street subway. 

Whether a native of or a stranger to Boston, f 
city is very inviting as one cannot but admit that 
is very tired. Even with the fatigue in the balar. 
against such a trip, one must admit that it is « 




CALENDAR. 

19, — Frank R. Roberson lectures on •• Recent 
Eruptions of Mount Pelee " in the Union 
Lecture Course. 
20.— Y. M. C. A. meeting at 6-45 p. m. Topic. 

" Thanks-giving and thanks-living." 
21. — Meeting of Horticultural Seminar at 7-45 
p. m. Dancing class in Drill Hall at 
7-15 p. m. 
Nov. 23.— Sunday chapel exercises at 9-15 a. m. 

Y. M. C. A. meeting at 3-30 p. m. 
Nov. 25. — Social dance in Town Hall. 
Nov. 26. — " Home Sweet Home." 
Dec. 1— All Back! 



INFORMAL DANCE. 

A very enjoyable informal dance was given in the 
Drill Hall Friday evening, Nov. 14th. The program 
constated of fourteen numbers with three extras. 
Dancing began soon after five o'clock and continued 
until about 7-30 o'clock when refreshments were served 
by caterer Brown. Dancing then continued until 9-30 
when the company disbanded. Music was furnished 
by the college orchestra and by the cadet band. Some 
of those present were : Prof, and Mrs. Paige, Prof, and 
Mrs. Hasbrouck, Miss Jenks of Smith, Miss Fuller of 
Smith. Miss True of Mt. Holyoke, Miss Hinkley of 
Amherst, Miss St. John of Smith. Miss Hobart of 
North Amherst. Miss Cushman of Northampton, Miss 
Sanborn of Amherst. Miss Ripley of Smith. Miss 
Barker of Smith, Miss Dodge of Smith, Miss Hunt of 
Amherst. Miss Sterns of Mt. Holyoke. Miss Peerseof 
Smith, Miss Stevens of Smith. Miss Raynalds of Mt. 
Holyoke. Miss Waite of Smith, Miss Thissell of Mt. 
only a trip full of pleasure but also full of instruct!: H ^ Ki Miss Prou i x of Smith, Miss Harrington of 
as it gives him a great insight into the characterist Sm||ht M|ss Stede of Amherst Mr and Mrs cleaves 

and so In spite of the app of Amherst MrS- Herman Babson and Mrs. Charles 

re P a Wellington acted as patronesses. 



HORTICULTURAL SEMINAR. 

Mr. Edmund C. Powell, associate editor of [he New 
England Homestead spoke before the Horticultural 
Seminar Friday evening. Nov. 7, on the subject 
•• Apple growing as a business." Mr. Powell laid great 
stress on the necessity of proper selection and cultiva- 
tion of fruits and advocated planting for quick returns. 
He advocated the cold storage system by which the 
bulk of the crop could be kept until a time of scarcity 
and consequent high prices. Shipments of American 
fruit to Europe are becoming larger from year to year 
and offer good profits to the shipper and grower. Mr. 
Powell stated that Germany and France have not been 
Invaded by American shipments owing to the fact that 
the markets of those countries have not as yet been 
investigated. This work however, will be undertaken 
by the government during the ensuing year and will 
doubtless ultimate in an increase demand for American 
fruit produce for shipping purposes. 



of the old Puritan state 

ent waste of time one is sure to feel well 

when he stops to consider it carefully. 

A. N.S., 



'05 



NOTICE. 



PROHIBITION CLUB. 

Owing to an effort made by Mr. Calvin of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago in behalf of the National Intercol- 
legiate Prohibition Society, a branch of the other 
We WOUld respectfully ask those ( society has been established in this college. The fol- 
Our subscribers WhO are back On the 'owing officers have been elected: President. H.J. 
our bodswimwp w Franklin; Vice-President. E. A. Back; Secretary, 

subscriptions tO pay Up at Once. F p H utc hings; Tresurer. C E. Moseley. 

Business Manager 



i/ 



FOOTBALL. 

Amherst, 15; Massachusetts, 0. 

Massachusetts played her last football game of the 
season, Saturday, Nov. 8. and were defeated by Am- 
herst on Pratt Field by the above score. Amherst 
has a particularly strong team this year, and from the 
outset, the result of the game was never in doubt. 
Massachusetts went into the game in a slightly crip- 
pled condition ; Capt. Halligan and Connelly were 
both out of the game ; but Walsh at half-back and 
Gardner at tackle put up a better game than could be 
expected of them considering their lack of training. 
O'Hearn too was In bad shape physically, but his 
playing did not seem to be effected and his work on 
the defensive was one of the features of the game. 

Massachusetts won the toss and chose the east 
goal. Quill kicked to Ahearn on the 20-yard line, 
and he ran it back ten yards. Massachusetts could 
only make short gains and soon lost the ball on downs. 
Amherst could not gain either, however, and the ball 
changed hands again. This time Snell punted on the 
third down to Amherst's 25-yard line. On the next 
play Blram found a hole in the line, and aided by 
splendid Interference from Lewis ran 85 yards for the 
first touchdown. The try at goal was a failure. 
Snell kicked off to the five-yard line and Quill ran the 













I|ri 









44 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



45 



ball back 20 yards. Massachusetts held and Am- 
herst punted to Ahearn who was downed In his tracks. 
The visitors fumbled on the next down and Quill for 
Amherst ran the ball back of the goal posts. Am- 
herst had to be penalized for holding however, and the 
ball was called down on the 25-yard line. After 
changing hands once or twice, the ball was in Am- 
herst's possession on the 30-yard line, and they suc- 
ceeded In retaining It this time long enough to make 
a second touchdown. Blram heeled the punt out, 
but Lewis again missed an easy goal. Score, Am- 
herst 10. Massachusetts 0. Blram received the 
kickoff on the 10-yard line and Amherst's fine inter- 
ference ran the ball back almost 50 yards before 
Walsh succeeded in bringing him down. Amherst 
now played a strong offensive game and had the ball 
on Massachusetts 20-yard line before they lost it for 
holding. Massachusetts could not gain and Snell 
punted out of bounds, the ball going to the home team 
on Massachusetts 25-yard line. Then occurred some 
good football. The visitors fought every inch of 
ground and when Quill was sent through for a touch- 
down from the two-yard line, he barely made it. 
Lewis missed goal. Score. Amherst 15, Massachu- 
setts 0. The half ended soon after with the ball in 
Amherst's possession on her own 45-yard line. 

In the second half there was no scoring. The 
Massachusetts team took a strong brace and though 
they did not make long gains or consistent ones until 
the last five minutes of play, they had the ball In their 
own possession enough to keep their goal from being 
seriously threatened. The score : 



Collet N°**S- 



heating-plants is 



—All out for basket-ball. 
—Work of the central 
finished. 

—Many of the men have been playing tennis dur 
the last week. 

—The informal dance held last Friday was a 
cess from every point of view. 

— M. F. Ahearn had his shoulder Injured r 
playing a practice game last week. 

The freshman class defeated the Juniors at!; 

ball last Wednesday by a score of 10-0. 

Mr W. H. Fahey, the representative-elect i 

Pittsfield, Mass., Is a brother of J. J. Fahey, 04. 

Many of the men have been out gunning, 

report game as being plenty except partridge v 
seem to be scarce. 

—Contractor Dodge, who is building the 
boarding house, claims the building will be compk 
the 1st of December. 

H. C. Bowen, who had his leg badly injurt 

few weeks ago, has returned to college. He Is 1 
Improved but Is still obliged to use crutches. 

—Prof. C. S. Walker delivered a lecture in 
Amherst institute course at Springfield, 



-P. W. Brooks and G. L. Barrus. '03, spent a few 
last week at the home of the latter In Goshen 
is., where they went over the grounds and building 
s International Medical Missionary Association. 

1 Doc." Leavens, '97. formerly editor-ln-chlef of 
paper, spent a few days In town last week as the 
it of Prof. F. A. Waugh. Mr. Leavens delivered 
:ture before the senior seminar on Thursday last. 



COURT SQUARE THEATER. 

The bookings for the remainder of the month at 

Court Square theater Springfield will be as follows : 

Nov. 20. Henrietta Crossman in '* The Sword of the King." 
21 and 22. Francis Wilson in " The Toreador," 

24. " The Climbers." 

25. Charles Hawtrey in "A Message from Mars." 

26. •• When Reuben comes to Town." 

27. With Matinee, James O'Neill. 

28 and 29. With Matinee on 29, Stetson's Uncle Tom, s 
Cabin. 



Dep&rtmfnHf ^lotfs. 

LIBRARY. 

Henry W. Longfellow In American Men of Letters by 

Thomas Wentworth Hlgglnson, 1902. 920-4; 7. 

Although the Life, by the poet's brother, the Rev. 

Satur: Samuel Longfellow, probably contains the fullest and 



AMHERST. 

Raftery, 1. e. 
Pierce. Diehl. 1. t. 
Palmer, 1. g. 
Howard, c. 
Park, r. g. 
Varnum, r. t. 
Priddy, Griswold, r. e. 
Lewis, q. b. 
Blram, I. h. b. 
Washburn, Field, r. h. 
Quill, f. b. 



r. h 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

r. e., Whitaker 

r. t„ Snell 

r. g., Franklin 

c. Patch 

I. g., Craighead 

1, t., Gardner 

1. e., O'Hearn 

q. b., Ahearn 

b., Lewis, Shannon 

1. h. b.. Walsh 

f. b.. Munson 



Nov. 8, his subject being "Arbitration of 
Troubles." 

—Basketball practice has begun and a large nuir 
of candidates are out for the team. A heavy s;' 
ule has been arranged and will be published in 
next issue. 



and most complete account of Longfellow's career 
and characteristics, yet Mr. Hlgglnson has admirably 
prepared this present "memoir" and added some 
new and interesting data. He explains In his preface 
that " the present volume will be found marked by 
three eapeclal characteristics of Its own, First, much 
additional material Is here drawn from the manu- 



Touchdowns — Biram. Washburn, Quill' Referee— Cutts 
of Harvard. Umpire— Thorn of Harvard. Linesmen- 
Daniels of Amherst and Kenndey of M. A. C. Time — 25 
and 20 minute halves. Attendance— 2000. 



— R. A. Qulgley has moved from Room I scrjpt correspondence of the first Mrs. Longfellow, 
College, to Thompson House. It Is expected ,^1^ from ner famlIy and bearing upon the poet's 
Mudge,'06 will open a barber shop in Room I snarly married years and first visit to Europe, during 
time this week. what was undoubtedly the formative period of his life. 

G. A. Drew of the Horticultural departmen Secondly there is a good deal of material obtained 

been spending a few days In Hampshire and W from the manuscript volumes known as the •• Harvard 
ter counties examining apple orchards and colleCollgp. Papers " and preserved at the University 
samples of typical apple soils. Library, elucidating the academical side of Longfel- 

A petition Is being circulated among the stu iow f a life. Thirdly, there Is a series of extracts from 

to have the faculty postpone the exercises from Mi earlier writings, dating from college days and not 
day. Nov. 28, until Saturday, Dec. 6. This is llthei* brought together, but showing the origin and 
In order to get a longer Thanksgiving recess. powth of his life-long desire to employ American 



I I I 






material and to help the creation of a native litera- 
ture ; the desire which had Its final fulfilment In 
" Evangeline" and "Hiawatha." 

It Is Interesting to watch the development of this 
•• universally loved" poet from his first attempt at 
thirteen to his richer products of mature years. There 
Is a liability on the part of some biographers to heroize 
— If I may be pardoned for using the term — their sub- 
jects ; and In the case of Longfellow a rare opportu- 
nity Is offered, for he ranks so far above all other 
American and many English poets In popularity. 
However, Mr. Hlgglnson, with a friendly zeal to faith- 
fully portray Mr. Longfellow's genius. Is yet experi- 
enced enough and wise enough to be Impartial In his 
treatment. 

Longfellow has been well named the •• poet of the 
home and fireside," and he holds a peculiar place 
among the song writers of the world, being especially 
fitted by his life to depict the happier events of life ; 
as Mr. Hlgglnson remarks: "Except for two great 
domestic bereavements, his life would have been one 
of absolutely unbroken sunshine ; in his whole career 
he never encountered any serious rebuff, while such 
were his personal modesty and kindliness that no one 
could long regard him with envy or antagonism. 
Among all the sons of song there has rarely been such 
an Instance of unbroken and unstained success." 

It is the life of such a man that Mr. Hlgglnson has 
tried to portray and the picture Is so pleasing that one 
turns away with regret when other duties demand 
attention only to return again, with renewed Interest 
and keener pleasure. 



Alu 



mm. 



'94.— Arthur H. Cutter. M. D.. Harvard Medical 
School, 1901. 333 Broadway, Lawrence, Mass. 

Ex.-'95. — Irving Bentley has purchased the Great 
Barrington New Marlboro stage route. 

'95.— Mrs. Josle Hartwell Ballou, wife of Henry 
A. Ballou, died Saturday evening. Nov. 8th. after a 
short illness, at her home on North Pleasant St., 
aged 24. The funeral services were held In the First 
Congregational church at Amherst on the following 
Tuesday afternoon, Rev. W. E. Strong of Amherst 
officiating. Rev. David Strong of Wllllamstown. Vt., 








4 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



a former pastor of Mrs. Ballou's spoke feelingly of her 
helpful life and womanly character. The remains 
were taken to Shelburne for interment. In this hour 
of deep affliction, Mr. Ballou has the heartfelt sym- 
pathy of the College and of many friends. 

•97 —George D. Leavens visited the College re- 
cently. By invitation of Prof. Waugh he spoke be- 
fore the senior division in Horticulture on strawberry 
culture. Mr. Leavens has been working on straw- 
berries for the past three or four years and has ar- 
rived at some very interesting and satisfactory results. 

•97,_Clayton F. Palmer is taking advanced work 
in Zoology in Leland Stanford, Jr., university. 

•98.— Samuel W. Wiley fs employed as chemist 
for the American Agricultural Chemical Co.. Balti- 
more, Md. 

•99.— Herbert W. Dana is serving on the Editorial 
Staff of the New Haven Register, New Haven, Ct. 

• 9 9._Frederic H.Turner has just moved Into a 
new hardware store in Great Barrington. 



Spring Clothes. 



Just the sort* that young men will appreciate. 
There's a collection here that absolutely cannot 
he found elsewhere in West.rn New England. 
Will you come and see it? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 



Haynes & Co., 

A /ways Reliable. 



SrilINGHIELD, 



Mass 




PULLMAN 

VESTIBULE 

LIMITED 

TRAINS 



OVER 

New York 

Central 

Lines 



DAILY SERVICE. 


To ALBANY, 


9 Trains 


To BUFFALO, 


B Trains 


To CHICAGO, 


I Trains 


To CINCINNATI, 


3 Trains 


To DETROIT, 


5 Trains 


To ST. LOUIS, 


3 Trains 



THROUOH COACHES 

BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



SLEEPING CARS 



DINING CARS 



EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 

TO AND FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER, 



Through the 
Famous . . . 



READ DOW*. 
9.0T. A.M. 6.02 P.M. 



10.00 
10.A0 
11.50 



6.4ft 
6.58 
8.01 
U.03 



AS FOLLOWS: 

It. Amherst 
nr. Palmer 
lv. Palmer 
nr. Worcester 
ar. Boston 



HEAD UP. 

nr. 9.06 A.M. 8.36 P.M. 
lv.8.20 " 7.51 " 
nr.7.36 " 7.36 " 
lv.6.25 «' 6.10 " 
lv.5.00 " 5.00 " 



Berkshire 
nills . . . 

AND THE 

Albafip 6ateu>ap, 

Which is always Open. 



F „ r ,„ r U„ fl .„„r n ,.«o„,t, ra eU M «„..c..c.n„a 11 c k «. g e.,or««<.re».*.8. HANSON, O.P.A..S— .«- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




47 



NINETEEN HUNDRED. 

K. Atkins, Civil Engineer with E. C. & E. E. 
Ms. address, No. Amherst. 

Baker, Veterinarian, address, 70 West St.. 
afield. 

H. Brown, Fruit Raiser, address, Marlboro. 
I. A. Campbell. Townsend. 
H. Canto, student, College Physicians and Sur- 
geons, 452 V/est 23d St.. New York. N. Y. 
H. L. Crane, Small Fruit Grower. Ellis. 
A. F. Frost, New York City. 

J. E. Halligan, Assistant Chemist Hatch Experi- 
ment Station, Amherst. 

A. A. Harmon, Veterinaran, 588 Broadway, 
Lowell 

E. T. Hull. Student, Columbia Medical, New York 
City. 

J. W. Kellogg. Assistant Chemist, Experiment 
Station. Kingston, R. I. 

M. B. Landers. Saginaw Medical Institute, Sagi- 
Mich; 

Lewis, Machine Shop, Carew Cotton Gin Co., 
Bridgewater. 

C. Monahan, Instructor, Amherst High School, 
Amherst. 

A. W. Morrill, graduate student M. A. C, Amherst. 
M. H. Munson, with W. M. Wilson, Stier Freder 
& Rencher, Tarkio, Mo. 

G. F. Parmenter, Student. Brown University Chem- 
istry Department, Providence, R. I. 

F. G. Stanley, Student, Harvard University, 10 
Longewood Terris, Back Bay, Boston. 

A. M. West. Assist. Biochemic Division, Depart- 
ed of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

R. D. Gilbert, Kent Chemical Laboratory of Yale 
Univ.. address. Corner High and Library St., New 
Haven. Conn. 

E. K. Atkins, Secretary class 1900. 

'01. — Thaddeus Graves, Jr., was married on Sat- 
urday afternoon, the 8th of November, to Miss Cora 
La Von King at the home of the bride. At home. 
Thuradays in February, at 16 Elm St., Hatfield, 
Mass. 

*0l. — N. J. Hunting began last Monday morning to 
make the annual inspection of Babcock machines 
through the state. 




<3/>e HEIR 

to the FARM ^ 



'/ 



Will make the old farm pay 
If he farms the farm in the 
modern way. 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

ISaught by Mail. 

A thorough and practical course, 
under the direct charge of Win. I'. 
Hi unks. Ph. D., (Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College). Our course is 
based mi 'Brooks' Agriculture;" it 
trestS of soils, plants, tillage, drain- 
age, irrigation, manures, fcrtilizutii in. 
crop rotutiou and everything pei- 
taining to liioiifv-inakiiiu on the 
farm. Text books (3 volumes, H00 
I i.n:i's, 300 illustrations) free to stu- 
dents. Send for 3o page book de- 
scribing course in full. 

Home 

Correspondence 

Schools, 

Springfield. Ma* j. 
Other Course: liiislnrMi, Hhorttmnd, 
l'fiiiiiafiHlilii, Ty|»-writ.iiiir. Normal 
lour*.- (ltd forteui'lii-r'H certificate. 



STEPHEN LANE FOLK Ell, 

200 Broadway, New Yokk. 

Cluli and Collets IMns and Kings. 
Uold and Silver Medals. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry. 



"UP TO THE MINUTE" 



IN 



MENS FINE SHOES, 



The Northampton Shoe Co., 



88 Main St., 



Northampton, Mabh. 










ml 








THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




Ex.-'Ol.— Mr. Clarence Alfred Boutelle was mar- 
ried last Wednesday to Miss Ethel Irene Barr at 
Spencer. Mass. Mrs. Boutelle Is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen S. Barr. At home after Feb- 
ruary first, Home Farm. Lenox. Mass. 

There were quite a number of alumni in town Nov. 
8th to witness the M. A. C— Amherst football game. 
Among them were C. S. Crocker. '89. A. S. Kinney. 
•96. W. S. Fisher. '98. W. R. Pierson. '01, C. L. 
Rice. '01. A. C. Wilson. '01. and H. A Paul, '02. 
W. A. Damson, '01, J. H. Belden. '02. J. C. Hall. 
•02. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

Yale vs. Harvard next Saturday ! 
Princeton's new mascot, a young tiger. Is very 
appropriate but we hope It is not a hoodoo. 

Only fifty-six out of 141 Freshmen at the North- 
western university were able to pass an examination 
In spelling. 

The Intercollegiate gun shoot held on Princeton's 
grounds. Nov. 14, was won by Yale with a score of 
206. P. Archer of Princeton won the individual 
championship by killing 47 birds out of a possible 50. 

_ — -•- 

NOTICE.— M. A. C. men wishing to attend Mr. 
and Mrs. Petlt's informal hop in the town hall next 
Tuesday evening can obtain tickets of L. E. Peck. '03. 
No tickets will be on sale at the hall. 



SO YEARS' 

EXPERIENCE 




Track Marks 

DCSIONB 

Copyright* Ac. 



Anyone een<nn» a a«eu» »« ««a«rti»uoa msr 

naiakiv aaeertain ©nr opinion free whether an 
metal nottee, without chary, in tha 

Scientific American. 



ATendaomelyuruetrsted wwklf. feS"SJ t M« 

MUNN S Co. 8e,Bro ' dw,T New York 

Brine' 5m" " « r St, Weebla*too. D. fc 



Write a Note 

to Johnson 



when you want a book, a picture, florae stationery 
or anything else worth having. 




COLLEGE SIGNAL 



DECEMBER 3. 1902. 



NO. 



Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AND ART DEALER, 
313-315 Main St., - - 8prlngfleld, Mas* 



HENRY AJDAMS 

HO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 




Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
ts and Alurnil art requested la contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collhob Signal. Ammkkst. Mass 



ll subscribers until its discontinuance is erdered and arrears are paid. 
Business Manager. 



Thb Sional will be 
Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903, Editor-In Chief. 
WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN, 1 903, Business Manager. 
HOWARD MORGAN WHITE, I 904, Assistant Business Manager. 
L FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903, College Notes. HENRY JAMES FRANKLIN, 1903, Alumni Notes. 

HARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON. 1903, FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. I 904. Athletics. 

RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904. Department Notes. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904, Interco'legtate. 

■ORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905. HERBERT HAROLD GOOuENOUGH. 1905. 



Terms: fl.OO per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Pontage outside el United States end Canada, 8tc. extra. 



Pure Drug 



AMHKRHT, Ml 

y. M. C.a. 

Foot-Bal Association . 

_ .. j. . CoUsga «Vu r,lmg Club. 

s and Medicines, ^jff^^^: 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottingham, Pres. Athletic Association. 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. Base-Bali Association. 

C. P. Halllgan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

R. H. Robertson, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
J. C. Cook, Manager. 
A. L. Peck, Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Pest Office at Amherst. 



FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED ASP- 
DOMESTIC CIGARS. CIGARETTES, ETC 



Ed i-to rials. 



MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, KISH1NG TACl 

and sporting goods. A Kansas paper notes the fact that Carrie Nation 

has visited Harvard and departed without having a 

Matalllc CartrWgea for Piatola, Sporting and SprIngfl«Mr degree con f errec i upon ner ^ narrow escape, to say 

Sunday ana night cell* reepon.led *°at residence, flr-i ^ ^^ , 
want of Cbaae's Block. 

Owing to a delay in closing some of the home 
games we have as yet been unable to publish the 
basketball schedule. It will doubtless be Inserted 



HOTE 



l_ HENKlNGnour next issue. 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 



Ben " Chadwick, the noted song composer of 



rtrst ClH.s Lunch. Room. SL00 »n.l "£"***•• *"* ' 
$1 m i to $'l.oo. Double. »*.«>; with Bath, *8.oa. 

'«• ©• ] " ' * JSiaSisM. i^estfWd, who has been engaged to write the music 

or the new college song, visited Amherst Monday 



18 I,vm*n ««., oppsaUa Vmton D*pot, 

Telephone, 4»3. 



COOIjBY'S HOTBIi.sp*i<*""'* L " "n charge r ne music Is in the form of a stirring 



s „ind presented his composition before the committee 
The music is 
hknkv b. ma rsh. Prop rietor. Tiarch which can be made wonderfully effective when 

All the modern conveniences. First el ass seeing by a large chorus of male voices, it met with 
rnodations for 800 guests, he hearty approval of the committee and no doubt 

- ... .w ¥lH be extremely popular with the students. Mr 

RESTAURANT ON TIIE EUROPEAN PLAN. 




Chadwick has been instructed copyright the piece and 
to publish five hundred copies for the college. 



The senior class is making an effort to cause their 
class day exercises at Commencement to be as elab- 
orate and interesting as time and labor will make them. 
The election of speakers and committees has been 
made early with the end in view of presenting matter 
of as high a type as possible. The fact that these 
exercises have been slighted has been painfully evi- 
dent In years past and has beyond doubt been caused 
by the increased amount of work with which the grad- 
uating class has to contend as Commencement draws 
near. The fact, however that class day exercises are 
so popular and invariably draw a large number of spec- 
tors is a plea for their every possible Improvement. 
An added feature of Commencement will be the pres- 
ence of caps and gowns which the class has voted to 
adopt. Although it has not been the custom In the 
past for the senior class to wear caps and gowns the 
scheme has met with wide favor and it is safe to predict 
that a strong effort will be made to continue their use. 




5<> 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



5* 



If I 










What is there in a " yell ?" Its real value to an 
athletic team during games is often a question in the 
minds of many people. To the student's mind it is 
as essential as is the referee or the time keeper. It 
acts as a stimulant to the contestants and as a safety 
valve for the tense feelings of the onlookers. Not 
only is it often an attractive side feature of the game 
but it often spurs on the team to victory when other- 
wise defeat would have been its lot. When, however, 
any feature of the yell causes it to diverge from its 
original purpose and to become offensive to spectators 
not only does its value become diminished but it 
becomes a source of condemnation to its participants. 
In the recent interclass football game a yell was used 
which was a cause of embarrassment to the ladies 
present and a source of mortification to many students, 
especially those who chanced to have friends witness- 
ing the game. Deplorable as was the circumstance 
even more deplorable was the fact that the yell was 
sanctioned and encouraged by certain upperclassmen 
who evidently cared little for the dignity and good 
name of their college. We sincerely hope that a 
respectable yell will be adopted by the class of 1905 
and will be used by them at ensuing class contests. 



A thing which comes to us very appropriately at 
Thanksgiving time is the assurance on the part of the 
Faculty that junior electives are to be installed in the 
very near future. That the long cherished hope of 
so many students is at last to be realized is indeed a 
reason for thankfulness. We can realize that the 
task of rearranging a college curriculum Is no small 
one but if the end to be attained is to be of marked 
value to the institution, as we believe it will be to this 
college, it is well worth the cost. We have seen too 
many cases where men have turned from our doors 
to enter other colleges in which they could pursue, 
unhampered by superfluous studies, the lines of work 
for which they had a natural adaptation, and the pur- 
suit of which would mean their success in the profes- 
sional world. In this way Massachusetts has beyond 
doubt lost many men who would have been valuable 
acquisitions to her student body and of honor to her 
alumni. The scheme which compels a man to take 
advanced work for which he has neither love nor 
talent seems to us to be not only a narrow minded one 
but one which will react to the detriment of the stu- 



dent and to the department in which he spends, 
many fruitless hours. Unless the student hasijj 
interest for the subject at hand the instructor is ItJ 
ifestly placed at a disadvantage and his value a. 
teacher is materially lessened. In the case of in 
classes this may be and unquestionably is a source 
harm which is felt throughout the institution, 
a liberal course of electives, Massachusetts as asci; 
tific college has every chance to become a lea;- 
The advantages which she offers are surpassed by i- 
colleges of her class and this fact is an apprecia: 
one to prospective students. It is on the word libe- 
that we would lay stress. We do not believe tha 
liberal course of study would make it necessary 
a man to take either Agriculture or Horticulture 
order to take the degree of Bachelor of Scien: 
Formerly these two departments may have hei: 
major place in the importance of this college i 
around them may have grown up the various ofl 
departments that the strength and utility of those :. 
might be made the greater, but while 
efficiency of the departments of Agriculture and H; 
ticulture may not have deteriorated their allies h; 
become of equal importance and have held I 
inducements which have attracted their full quota 
men. That policy which enables a man to give 
undivided attention to those departments for which 
has a thorough interest and in which he has an ear- 
desire to perfect himself seems to us to be a lib: 
one. 



article before the closing of the competition March 
21st. The election of new men will then be made, 
on th oasis of merit and ability, from the list of those 
who thus become eligible, it being understood that in 
all cases of doubt the preference shall be given to 
who contributed prior to March 1st. In the 
of vacancies occuring after the annual election 
jame procedure shall be followed, except that the 
for the receiving of recommendations and the 
ig of the competition shall be decided by the 

rd." 
^e would urge all students who intend to try for 
>ns on the board to lose no time in submitting 
contributions. If desired, assignments will be 
made by the Editor-in-chief. 

1 




posltl 
their 



OFFICIAL NOTICE. 

For the benefit of underclassmen we print the 
lowing rules relating to the election of new mem: 
to the board of editors of this paper : 

••Competition for positions on this board shall 
open to all students of this college and contribut 
are solicited at all times. All such contribu: 
shall be considered In the election of new men. 
addition to this competition, recommendations :' 
the English department shall, whenever the B:. 
deem it advisable, be submitted not later than Ma 
1st. The list of those thus recommended toge: 
with those who have previously contributed sha 
published in the next issue of the College SW 
The men whose names are thus published may" 
become eligible by submitting at least one addit 



A GLIMPSE OF NATAL. 

(Continued from November 19.) 

xt day seated on the backs of stocky little 
Ba$U|o ponies we start on our journey north. The 
country changes rapidly in appearance, the elevation 
chanfing constantly and the landscape becoming more 
rugged the higher we ascend. On the way we meet 
many natives, who greet us with a " saku bona," ex- 
change snuff with our interpreter and leave us with a 
" hamba kahle," which means " go carefully." It is 
now for the first time that we see the native in his 
own life. We see his kraal like a collection of enor- 
mous bee hives, perched on the top of some hill. 
The number of these hives — like huts arranged in a 
circle around a circular enclosure where the cattle are 
kept at night — indicate the number of wives a man 
has. The chief man and favorite wife live in the 
central and largest hut while iri the other huts are the 
other wives with their respective families. Outside 
the circle of living huts are usually a few smaller grain 
and store huts raised several feet from the ground on 
poles. The whole kraal comprising the store and 
living huts and the cattle inclosure, is, as a general 
thing, surrounded by a thick high hedge of thorny 
shrubs. On the land adjoining the kraals we see the 
herds of cattle with their wide spread horns and mot- 
tled hides, grazing. We see, poorly cared for fields of 
maize, kaffir corn, and native vegetables, being hoed 
or planted by the Zulu woman, their babies on their 
backs, while the men sit in the entrances of their 
homes and smoke an opium like drug, or else do 
nothing 



Occasionally we stop at a kraal and get a refresh- 
ing drink of amase, an invigorating preparation of milk 
made by curdling and souring it In a short time. 
Towards night a sudden and severe thunder storm 
compels us to take shelter In one of the kraals we 
pass. We crawl on our hands and knees through the 
door, window, and smoke-exit combination. Once In- 
side, it takes us several minutes to become at all 
accustomed to the smoke or to see anything of the 
place we have entered. At last, however, we make 
out a large room in which everything is blackened 
with the soot of many fires. In the centre of this 
room is a wood fire over which is being cooked some 
kind of porridge. Around the fire is a circle of dusky 
faces and the little dark naked forms of children who 
play with the dirty flea -covered mongrel dogs. Be- 
side the walls are the pillow sticks, rolls of matting 
and blankets while on one side is a small place divided 
off for calves. The dark, hard, lustrous floor is made 
from a peculiar mixture of cow dung and the earth of 
ant hills. With the anticipation of sleep we wish each 
other pleasant dreams. But we are not allowed to 
let our minds dwell for long on what the night may 
mean to us. A hot and not unsavory meal to our 
hungry selves is set before us in an immense iron pot 
from which we all eat with large wooden spoons. 
After we have satisfied our voracious appetites we 
gather around the fire for the nights are chilly, and in 
the ruddy glare of the uncertain light an old hag 
begins to tell one of the oft repeated folk-lore tales 
they so much love. Superstitious, mystical, yet 
beautiful are they in their weird simplicity. Time 
passes, we know not how fast, nor care so long as the 
spell lasts. The fire has long gone out and only a 
few dying embers are still glowing in the fire place. 
At last the rythmical murmur of the old woman's 
voice ceases. The charm is broken. We retire to 
our blankets, some to sleep, but some to rehearse to 
themselves the tales just told and to abstract from 
them the traits and customs to be learned of the 
dusky people sleeping at our sides. 

All the laws, customs and religions of these people 
are based on superstition and are only accounted for 
in that way. During the hours of the night we reflect 
on all these things and on the fleas. The custom of 
polygamy is the most marked. It Is easy for us to 
see the degrading Influence it has on the race. 



<«< 



1 



• 










5* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



53 



Women are merely articles of merchandise, bartered 
for with cattle and money. A wife maybe bought 
for ten cows or thirty pounds. She is the property of 
her husband as are all her children and absolute obe- 
dience to him is required of them all. The woman's 
life is that of the slave. About all the work is done 
by her, while the men amuse themselves smoking or 
hunting. There is no home-life among these people. 
Constant discord and jealousy is the rule among the 
wives. Cruelty and disrespect is given to the old. 
It is to be noticed that but a few of the young men 
are at their kraals. They are away in the cities earn- 
ing money with which to purchase wives. Happy is 
the man with many daughters, for every daughter 
means to him ten cows and it is by the number of his 
cattle that a man's wealth is estimated. Upon the 
death of a man, all his property including his wives 
and children go to his eldest son to be his wives and 
his children. Another degrading influence among 
these people is found in their witch-doctors. These 
are. as a rule, men, who with a little higher intelli- 
gence than the mass of their race, play upon the 
superstitions of the people, often being the cause for 
many of the crimes perpetrated by them. 

We are in the saddle at dawn but notwithstanding 
the hard beds, the dogs, the fleas, '.he calves, the 
smoke that choked us, and brought tears to our eyes, 
and all the other discomforts, we don't regret our stay 
there, feeling repaid by all that we have seen and 
heard. We are now in the hills beautiful in their 
rugged grandeur. They stretch away in the distance, 
fading into blue, like the waves of the sea in ridges 
and hollows, one a little higher than the other, reach- 
ing to some elusive point away off, ever changing on 
the horizon. We rest our ponies while we drink in 
the scene with enraptured souls as it lies before us 
rough, rugged, treeless and bare, but grand ! O so 
grand ! As we go on, up hills and down into the val- 
leys, we cross the mountain- brooks, rushing pell-mell 
in their narrow channels to join with each other on 
their way towards the ocean. Beside these brooks 
grow the tree ferns graceful in their height. Further 
on the character of the country changes once again, 
the hills becoming smooth and flat plateaus, severed 
here and there by deep heavily weeded canons 
whose stone sides are walled with sheer precipices. It 
is on these tablelands that we find the largest variety 



of wild flowers in Natal. Many of our choicest cu; 

vated species are. we find, here thriving, and appet 

more beautiful for their natural setting. Beside *J 

bubbling springs of cold crystal water, we see te 

pearl white callaand the emerald clinging sm.'ax. Ee 

tween the stones over which the waterfalls plunge 

turbulent seething foam the begonia sends its root 

Here we find our floral friends, old and new. J 

evening we watch the beautiful sight of the mist * 

folding itself on the land like a gigantic tablecloth beic 

laid on a gigantic table .fit dining-board for one of tfc 



AN EPISODE. 

'm afraid. Frank, if 1 go. you'll be sorry you 
me, for I'll be a bore to you as well as to the 
pi the family." 

(ou get your suit case packed, and let the matter 
luntil we meet here, after the holidays; and if 
lon't change your views on the feminine question 
my guess. Ha! ha! I can picture you 



as you fall into Flo's clutches. 
I that she is no respecter of persons. 




some kind of action. I'll prove to you that 

all alike. A little flattery, a little coddling, 

y're ready to kneel at your feet. Tell them 

if they're homely and you can't touch with 



th 



I warn you 
She's the 
ncient dieties. From this plateau region the la- qSest thing in skirts that I have met for along 
rises gradually in a series of hills to the Drakensb: j^B j f the re were more of her kind. I think there 
mountains averaging about six thousand feet in he,; wou y be f ewer cynics like yourself." 
some of the peaks reaching the high altitude .. Hang it, man. you're making me out a pretty 
°10 000 feet. Through the hill region between ' poor stick of a fellow. By the way you talk I'm a 
plateaus and the mountains we never see the plar pessimist of the bluest stripe. But you've aroused 
tions such as we saw on the coast. Here we find me 
stock farm, horses, cattle, and sheep being rais-g 
while for fruit figs, plums, apricots, and sometiir. 
apples.pears and peaches are cultivated.but these n«m 

have the quality of the American fruit. Sometr wireless telegraphy, let alone the proverbial ten foot 
we find large tracts of land planted with the Aus'po^BButl have nothing against your sister— the 
lian wattle and gum trees which grow very rapidly gods forbid— for she's got a decent kind of a brother, 
make good lumber while their bark is used extJ he is only a farmer, and— " 

sively in tanning. But we are almost through- » You old hypocrite." said Frank laughing, as he 
We take the train from Pleterms'shladBCarhart at the form on the couch. "He 
burg on a flying trip to the coal fields of Natal i aughs best who— well you know the old proverb. But 
see the collieries in operation. There are .; 'm going to turn in, you'd better also, and sleep off 
twelve of them running, and these, although fe ;ome of those ideas you've crowded into that 
timber, comfortably supply the colony's Bee: ;ranlum 

fill the coal bunkers of the steamers visiting her : "lUbe with you when I finish this pipe of Old 

' Our visit has been so short that we nee- 3old. Sweet dreams, laddie." 

ould not see everything and we feel that we He toy there awhile, watching the rings wiggle 

had but a "glimpse at South Africa's Florida, but hrough the haze, thinking. It was so seldom that 

nough to prophesy for it a brilliant fu: ie engag d in this form of amusement that his friends 

Wim *a toil so productive, with a climate so heal! ook It for granted he was ill when this occurred. 

d so varied and with a people with the energy a ^Mike to know whatever possessed me to prom- 
!hilitv to develop the natural resources to the *e Frank to go home with him at Thanksgiving, 
'idvintaee Natal cannot help but take a foremost :4««ood enough fellow in his way. and his folks 
fn making South Africa the great country she is t re all right. I suppose, but it'll only be a bore all 
in MiAMug -ound, A little country home, with the ordinary 

some *' H H Goodenou: irmerli characteristics. And as I'm Frank's rich 

iend tBy'll he tumbling all over themselves trying 



Twenty-two Japanese students at Yale celel j please me. But it's up to me, I suppose, so I 
the fiftieth birthday anniversary of the Mikado or light ■ well reconcile myself to fate. Guess I'll 

, . , . lrn In/* as he brushed the ashes from his pipe, 

night of Nov. I. ^ K . 

6 The morning rose clear and frosty, with just a 



feathery bloom of snow on the trees and ground, to 
make the hunter's heart glad. What an artist Winter 
is! How considerate of the welfare of Mother Earth. 
When she sorrows for the loss of her children, 
Spring and Summer, with their gayety and joyous- 
ness. and Fall with his jolly masquerading, and sur- 
prises, when these are gone she grows wrinkled and 
care-worn ; her nakedness lies bare to the thoughtless 
and unpitying eyes of the world, then Winter comes 
with his loving touch, and carefully smooths out the 
wrinkles, rounding out the angles into curves of beauty 
once more, and covering her with a robe more gorge- 
ous than she had ever worn, that sparkles and shim- 
mers In the noonday sun, dazzling the eye with its 
beauty. 

Who could fail to be filled with the invigorating life 
of such a day? Nor were Frank and Cyril any ex- 
ception. When the train pulled in at Saxonville, 
even Cyril was stirred from his usual lethargy to take 
some unusual interest in his surroundings. 

'• By Jove, she's a stunner, Frank." said Cyril, 
glancing out of the window. •• Do they grow In this 
part of the country? Impossible. But I say old 
chap, do you know her? If you do — oh, hang it man. 
no I'm not. but that's enough to interest any one. I 
say does she live here." 

" Well, I have a slight speaking acquaintance with 
her. But if you'd like to meet her. I'll do my best to 
have It occur," replied Frank, with just the evidence 
of a twinkle in his eye. 

"Oh, Frank, you don't know how glad I am to see 
you . Isn't this jolly." 

And Cyril almost fell down the car steps as he saw 
her throw her arms about Frank's neck and — well he 
wished he could have changed places with Frank for 
a minute. 

•• And this is Mr. Wolvert. I'm so glad you came. 
We've been having the jolliest time up at the house 
this morning guessing what you were like," and she 
beamed on him such a smile of sunlight, that he be- 
gan to grow warm. 

•• Yes, you know, Frank wrote us that you were 
such a cynic — ." 

" Now, Flo — ." 

" Well you did; but I'm glad you're not as bad as 
we pictured you Mr. Wolvert. But come, we'll talk 
when we're in the carriage ; and she led the way. 





54 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



55 



fastened upon her in sur- 



while Cyril's eyes were 
prise and wonderment. 

•' Well. I'll be— no, 1 won't but this beats the 
Dutch. Of all things, that's the best reception I ever 
received, however, and I believe I'm welcome. Won- 
der if she receives everybody this way, Formal ? 
Well she's formal all right. 1 believe I'm interested. 
But look out, don't get foolish. 

Florence kept a running fire of questions, all the 
way to the house, and told them of some of the plans 
in store. Here Cyril had a better opportunity to study 
her. He was as much impressed by her manner as 
by her beauty. She was modest, he felt that, but it 
was a different kind of modesty than he had ever 
been accustomed to. There was nothing assumed, 
neither was there too much liberty taken All in all 
she was quite a pleasing figure. They had almost 
reached the house, and Florence's tongue was still 
going when something happened. 

[To be continued] 



Obstrtf&*ions^C onc,u s" lon S 



A Boston paper, a few days ago. said that " The 

Amherst agricultural College seniors have voted to 

graduate in caps and gowns as being more academic 

than overalls and jumpers." The observer agrees 

with the writer that caps and gowns are more suitable 

than overalls and jumpers and previous graduating 

classes will probably admit the fact also. The college 

has in fact gone beyond the overall and jumper stage 

of its existence. The graduate is supposed to have 

enough knowledge by the time that commencement 

day comes round to insure his getting a position a 

little above that of a common farm hand, and the 

casting aside of his working clothes might be looked 

upon as a symbol of this advance. 

The real reason however for the change is not 
exactly as above stated. The fact is that there are no 
longer enough suits of overalls and jumpers to go 
round and the few remaining ones that have been 
handed down from one graduating class to another 
have become so patched and worn that it has been 
deemed advisable to purchase new commencement 

The caps and gowns will per 



them for other purposes than that for which they a: M' As in the the case of insects the plant which 
intended. For instance, they cannot be used, as a ^Hops such forms and habits as to successfully 
the overall, to eke out our slender supply of foot-bs ^ft its enemies is preserved and its kind is allowed 
uniforms, nor will they be valued as the covering f: jHltiply without serious handicap. " How a plant 
a scented sofa pillow. Besides the style in oven |Hcts itself from its enemies depends largely upon 
changes much oftener than in gowns. thiind of foes it has to fight against ; for example if 

# * * * * thafciage is devastated by eaternillers and a "freak" 

Say look at the paragraph quoted above and .,. <*Sis particular species happens to develop a few 
you can find a better example of ignorance than <■ prickles on its leaves, it would. gain an advantage 
the three words, " Amherst agricultural College." * would tend to be developed in ensuing genera- 
te inrec . «, Amher-t tlo«i" Not only do plants develop as individuals these 
course the population of the town of Amnerst is tc i . ; \ w 
y v fl< , r i ri ,it„M» no more protections but it is common for groups to so be 
certain extent interested in agriculture, no mores. ■ v -«- 

. u . ~J ,-fc cItp thrmiPhou' formed that the various protections combine to form 

however, than other towns of its size througnout »*»•« r 

nowe , , . .. , . tn olv . Amherst •■ a «tU "'gh impregnable barrier to the common 

ctatp • and it seems hardly fair to give Amnersi « & r & 

state, ana it seems j B enemies of the individuals. "The hedge row con- 

credit when the expense for maintaining tne con., ■ 

creu.il w..c k j^»tes tse f with the shiny, woody and thorny haw- 

rnmes from the state n general. Then the idea <m r > 

comes irom |nf»w b ^ f accompanied by a stout woody 

spelling •• agricu tural with a small a. r-c ■• , ». u , » i 

P K « o i ♦« k» crt lonnran- I^B whose thorns are frequently but not always 

newspaper in the city of Boston to be so ignoran. 1 ■ -"• ' 

newbpauc. j , n j Ai ,j hp ..d^B; then we have the wild dog rose, with its pow- 

the simDle rues of capitalization is indeed » B 

me bimuic iu y t^B stems and curved prickles; after which the 

rendmg. H he had wanted to ab brev a. t « . « * ^ ^^ 

would probably have sad "Thesemorso A a W surface o( , he wh0 , e and , he „ „ , he base 
e, c .-- A good many of « now think that A g . ^ ^ 

tural with a big " A ' sets more limitations on \ v » ,, , , 

lurai wiui - u. B _ s stlngs so tnat a p eace f u | vie w of vege- 

idea that people have of the purposes of the eolle J | * r & 

iaea inai ycuy.c r «■ tatlon shows upon investigation a veritable army of 

than ought to be the case and when it begins . P ^ ^ ,. 

spelled without the capital letter.-well.-lts the 1 H ^^ ^ ^^ mode of defense 
The official title of this Institution Is the » Ma, ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ 

chusetts Agricultural College and can only « Thg c eg ^ ^ 

rhanpedbv act of the Legislature. It has no conne. .... , u . -ui ! 

cnangea uy «tn u> i"^ b anlmsls to gain subsistance is however so striking and 

with either Amherst College or the town of Am!* 
except that it lies within the town limits of the Ian 



PLANT BATTLES. 

In every walk of life one is constantly seeing; 
amples which Illustrate the well known theory of thes 
vival of the fittest. In no better way is this law Itf 
fested than by the many ways which plants take 
protect themselves and to perpetuate their kind. 

In the October number of Harpers' J. J. * 
gives numerous illustrations of the contests which; 




dinary that we pause to consider some of the 
ommon cases. " The English sundeus Dro- 
'lica are insectivorous plants which grow on 
;s and which have leaves thickly covered with 
lar hairs which secrete a sticky fluid to entrap 
small flying insects. Perhaps more wonder- 
any Is the American Venus'-flytrap Dionaea 
'la, whose leaves hinged at the center close 
sufficiently rapid to entrap an insect and remain closed 
he insect struggles but opens when the it 



continually being enacted in the vegetable 



kingl 1 



costumes at any rate. 

haps cos. a little more, but they are expected to las. serves a definite purpose even I 

a h.tle longer ; for there will be no temptation to use | unobtrusive speck of color, or a hair 



become:, exhausted." 

Plants sometimes secrete sweet nectar in places 
and which give rise to varied structures and <*«^H ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ .^^ ^ ^ 

teristics which nature never intended for the ""M , nt0 w tneir t|me while tne honey of the 

variety. He says -Science points to the fact -^ |^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ,„„.„„„„ lrw#srU 
nature encourages nothing other than that w. 

It Is but 



gulled ii 

flowni is reserved for the proper fertilizing insects 
A wo 



on a flowe 1 



the 



mderful example of self protection is shown in 
of the acacia of tropical America which is 



subjected to the attack of leaf cutting ants. To 
check the depredations of these ants a standing army 
is garrisoned in the form of a colony of protecting ants 
which inhabit the hollow thorns and live on the honey 
secreted by the plant. 

These are but a few of the many interesting and 
wonderful ways with which plants are able to guard 
themselves and to enable them to perpetuate there 
kind. 



SOPHOMORE^FRESHMAN CONTESTS. 

On the afternoon of Wednesday. Nov. 19, the long 
delayed Sophomore— Freshman games took place on 
the campus. 

THE ROPE-PULL. 

At two o'clock Prof. Smith gave the signal and the 
twelve men set to. The Sophomores, favorites 
always in this event, got the drop and the rope began 
to move their way. However, the Freshmen were 
game and held sturdily before the Sophs were able to 
get more than eight feet. Then began the same old 
see-saw with neither side taking in. 

Just before the two minutes were up some very 
smart Sophomore standing near the Professor fired a 
revolver and the Pull was over. Of course there was 
a discussion but as the time was so nearly up and as 
it was not at all likely that the position of the rope 
would have changed, the contest was awarded to the 
1905 team. Won by eight feet. 

Immediately after the Rope Pull came the anuual 

FOOTBALL CAME. 

In this event the Freshmen were rather the favor- 
ites as they had the advantage in weight and several 
men from the 'varsity squad. The only hope for 
1905 was •' sophomore grit" and the possibility that 
the Freshmen might lose their nerve. As the game 
progressed it was plain that the Sophs had plenty of 
grit, but that alone was no match for the football 
which the Freshmen were playing and for their nerve 
which didn't seem to get lost. 

At the kick-off the ball went to Taft, '06. who car- 
ried it behind his own goal line, unintentionally yield- 
ing a safety to the Sophs. 

The Freshmen scored once in the first half. By 
means of the old delayed pass Taft was sent over for 
a touchdown. The goal was kicked. Score, '06, 6 ; 
'05. 2. 



-r 







l 







JI 




56 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



In the second half the Freshmen scored twice, Taft 
and Shannon each making a touchdown. Neither 
goal was kicked. Score, "05. 2; '06, 16. 

For '05, Walsh excelled, playing his usual fast 
game. For '06 the fine ground gaining of Taft, 
Shannon and the general all round work of the two 
Woods were features of the game. For a Sopho- 
more — Freshman game it was remarkably clean and 
the absence of slugging made it an interesting and 
pleasing contest to watch, and a factor in promoting a 
proper kind of rivalry between the two under classes. 

After the game many Freshmen produced pipes 
and began at once to enjoy their hard earned privilege. 

The teams lined up as follows : 

1905. 190fe 

Merrill. I.e. I. c. Wood 

Newhall, Ingham, 1. t., L U Foster 

Tupper. I. g. '• 8- Wellington 

Paige, c. c - Strain 

Yeaw. r. g. r.g., Cutter 

Holcomb, r. t. '• »-. Wood 

Pray. Tinkham. r. e. '. e.. Martin 

Allen, q. b. q- *>•• Kennedy 

Walsh. 1. h. !• n - Shannon 

Hunt, r. h. r, h.. Taft. Abbott 

Ladd. f.b. f - b.. Spun- 

Score— '05. 2; '06, 16. Touchdowns— Taft 2, Shannon, 
Referee— Prof. Smith. Umpire— Brooks, '03. Linesmen — 
—Jones. '03, Lewis, '04. Timekeeper— Prof. Hasbrouck. 
Time — 20 and 15 minute halves. 



FOOTBALL ELECTION. 

At a meeting of the members of this year's footfcj 
team the following officers were elected for the seast 
of 1903: Captain. G. E. O'Hearn ; manager, C. A 
Griffin; assistant manager, E. W. Newhall. In tfcj 
election all men who had played In one or mi:. 

games were eligible to vote. 

«•■ 

DECEMBER THEATRE BOOKINGS. 

EMPIRE THEATRE. HOLYOKE. 

Dec. 1 , 2. 3— New York Girl. 

4 5, 6— Wills Bros. 

8,9, 10 — Beyond Pardon. 

11, 12, 13 — Bohemians. 

j 4 — Sacred Concert by Helen May Butler i 

her Ladies' Military Band. 
29. 30, 31— A Gambler's Daughter. 

COURT SQUARE THEATRE, SPRINGFIELD. 

Dec. 1— Annie Oakley in •« The Western Girl." 

5 and 6— William Gillette in "Sherlock Holm; 
1 1 —Clyde Fitch's " Lover's Lane." 
12 and 13 — " Superba." 
25 — Foxy Grandpa." 
56 — Empire Theatre stock company in " 1 

Wilderness." 
30— Grace George in » Pretty Peggy." 



CLASS DAY SPEAKERS. 

At a meeting of the senior class held Wednesday. 
Nov. 19, the following men were elected to represent 
the class during the class day exercises at com- 
mencement : 

Class orator. H. J. Franklin. 

Campus orator, P. W. Brooks. 

Hatchet orator, C. P. Halllgan. 

Pipe orator, E. M. Poole. 

Class poet. M. H. West. 

Ivy poet, W. E. Tottingham. 

Class song, W. W. Peebles. 

A committee consisting of R. H. Robertson, A. 
Parsons and G. L. Barrus was chosen to have general 
oversight of class day exercises and S. C. Bacon. M. 
H. West and E. M. Poole were elected to constitute 
the class flower-bed committee. The class voted to 
wear caps and gowns during the Commencement 
exercises. 



Dec. 



CALENDAR. 

4. — H. T. Bailey of State Board of Educate 
lectures in the Union lecture course 
'• Beauties of Common Things." 

Dec. 4. — Regular meeting of Y. M. C. A. at 7 
p. m. Topic " Leal." 

Dec. 5. — Horticultural Seminar at 7-45 p. m. 

Dec. 6. — Journal club meets at 10-30 a. m. 

Dec. 7. — Chapel services at 9-15 a. m. Y. M. C 
at 3-30 p. m. 

Dec. 1 1.— Y. M. C. A. meeting at 7-30 p. m. Topi 
" Numbering Our Days." 

Dec 7. — Chapel services at 9-15 a. m. Y. M. C 
at 3-30 P. m. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



57 



RESOLUTIONS. 

|pted by the class of '95 of the massachusetts 
Agricultural College 

whereas, it has been the will of the Almighty Father to 
to the everlasting kingdom one near and dear to our 
smate. Henry A. Ballou, and 

whereas, we who have known Mrs. Ballou have felt the 

piy influence of her loving Christian character, and have 

/n her devotion to her husband and home, therefore 

f solved, that we. the members of the class of '95. extend 
iir classmate our heartfelt sympathy in his great bereave- 
[ ; that we feel the density of the shadow which has 
kred his life but we trust that out of this shadow may 
the gleam of hope that the hereafter may unite forever 
lives now so abruptly severed, and that this assurance 
1 illumine his now clouded pathway ; and also be it 

\sofoed, that we express to the aged father, the sister, and 
er, our sorrow for their loss, and we trust the All-wise 
cr will be with them to lighten the burden of their grief 
fis trying hour of their affliction. Furthermore be it 
solved, that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
and and family, also that a copy be spread on the class 
rds aud printed in the College Signal and the Amherst 



C. A. White. ) Committee 

H. D. Hemenway. > for the 
Wright A. Root. ) Class of '95. 



Yale's total enrollment is about 2785, an Incn 
of 100 over last year and the largest in the histot 
the university. Sheffield Scientific School ha; 
largest relative growth of the department. The 
School comes second. 



Dpled by the Q. T. V. Fraternity of the Massachusetts 
Cultural College. 

ereas, it has pleased our Heavenly Father in his wise 
dence to take to his heavenly kingdom one very dear to 
let, Henry A. Ballou, and 

treas. our hearts go out in tender sympathy to our 
ftr in this hour of his deepest trial and of his mourning 
le who was ever devoted to the highest things of life 
her husband and home, be it therefore 

olved. that we, the members of the Amherst chapter of 
, T. V. Fraternity extend to our brother the heartfelt 
Ithy which we cannot in any way fully express, and be 

)hed that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the be- 
reav«j husband, also that a copy be inscribed in the archives 
of the iraternity and that a copy be printed in the College 
Sionai 






M 
H 
F. 



H. West, 
J. Franklin, 
F. Hutchings. 



)Cc 

u 



Committee 
for the 
aternity. 




College |Voi?s- 



— Thanksgiving is over ! 

— Freshmen 16, Sophomores 2. 

— The Sophomores won the rope pull by eight feet. 

— The basketball team is hard at work and the 
team promises to be a fast one. 

— The second informal dance will be held in the 
Drill Hall, Friday evening, Dec. 12. 

— G. L. Drew has been visiting some of the prin- 
ciple apple orchards throughout the state. 

— The Q. T. V. fraternity has made an enlarge- 
ment in its suite of rooms In North College. 

— Tickets for the remaining numbers of the Union 
Lecture Course will be sold at 25 cents each. 

— Prof. F. A. Waugh spent last Saturday and Sun- 
day at Goshen, as the guest of G. L. Barrus, '03. 

— Forestry has been dropped from the schedule 
and advanced horticulture substituted in its place. 

— The new " Dom." is about completed and the 
co-eds will be assigned rooms sometime this week. 

— H. E. Hodgkiss. '02. Assistant Nursery Inspector 
of Massachusetts, has been inspecting nurseries In the 
vicinity of Boston. 

— F. A. Cutter of Pelham, Joseph Prenn of Am- 
herst, R. C. Goodale of Suffield, Conn, and F. W. 
Mahoney of Boston have entered the freshman class. 

— At a recent meeting of the Faculty it was voted 
to recommend to the trustees that horticulture be 
added to the courses of study offered for the degree 
of Ph. D. 

— N. H.Ingham, '05, who had his leg broken In the 
Sophomore — Freshman football game is resting com- 
fortably and expects to be around on crutches by an- 
other week. 

— Owing to the resignation of Rev. Dr. Wm. H. 
Milburn, the blind chaplain of the U. S. Senate, Dr. 
Couden father of T. D. Couden. '04, will be a candi- 
date for the vacancy. Mr. Couden has for several 
years held the position of chaplain in the House and 
his selection for the Senate Is desired by Dr. Milburn. 



Leland Stanford Jr. University is going to build a 
new gymnasium at a cost of $500,000. 




■\ 



■ 




58 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




59 




Alumni. 



NOTICE— The Seventeenth Annual Reunion and Ban- 
auet of the Massachusetts Agricultural College Club of 
New York will take place at the Hotel St. Denis. Broad- 
way and llth Street, Thursday evening. Dec. 11th. at 
half-past six o'clock. President Goode/l and others of 
Faculty past and present will be in attendance. Banquet 
Tickets Three Dollars. Under the established rule, 
please 'remit on or before Dec. 8, 1902; attendance at 
the Banquet enrolls any graduate or former student as a 

member of the Club. 

ALVAN L. FOWLER. '80, Treasurer. 

21 West 24th Street. New York. 

73 _The Northampton democrats have renomi- 
nated'for Mayor Seth S. Warner of Florence. Mr. 
Warner has. for several years, been secretary of the 
three counties agricultural society. 

■85 —Charles S. Phelps is Agriculturist and Horti- 
culturist for the School of Agriculture and Practical 
Horticulture at Brlarcliff Manor, N. Y. 



Sprinj^Clothes. 



Just the sorts that jouiik mon will appreciate 
Tln-iV* a eolk-ction here that absolutely CMtH.l 
be found elsewhere in West.rn New Ku-lam.. 
Will you come and see It? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOKS. 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 



SriUNUFlKU), 




PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 




OVER 

New York 

Central 

Lines 



To ALBANY, 
To BUFFALO, 
To CHICAGO, 
To CINCINNATI, 
To DETROIT, 
To ST. LOUIS, 



9. — James T. Hutchings, Pennsylvania Manufac- 
ig Light and Power Co., N. E. Cor. 10th and 
isom Streets, Philadelphia, Penn. 
•2,— Dr. Richard P. Lyman, has. with his father, 
Charles P. Lyman, opened a veterinary establish- 
it at No. 332, Newbury St., Boston. 
4. — Born at Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Oct. 26, 
r. and Mrs. Charles H. Hlggins, a daughter. 
14, — The report of the Government Entomologist 
he Cape of Good Hope for the year 1901 has 
been received at the Insectary. Mr. C. P. Lounsbury, 
s the Government Entomologist of the Cape of 
, Hope, is quite prominent in the work of fumi- 
ig with Hydrocyanic acid gas and also of intro- 
ig " lady bugs." 

-M. P. Sellew of Townsend, Vt. and bride 
In town recently. , 

,— J. A. Emrich is located at Eaton. Colo. 
, — G. A. Drew has lately been collecting samples 
iils in different parts of the state for the horticul- 
department. 

— W. E. Chapin, Chicopee. 
. — A. F. Frost, 78 5th Ave.. New York. N. Y. 
— E. K. Atkins is to be married to Miss Mary 
a Hobart, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. 
It, at North Amherst, this afternoon. 
-Y. H. Canto spent a few days In town 

ply. 

l_D.B.Tashjian, 1006 Chapel St.. New Haven, 



through coaches I EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 




Through the 
Famous 



BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



SLEEPING CARS 

D1NINQ CARS 



TO AND FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER, 

A8 FOLLOWS : 

BKAI) UP. 
RK.AH DOWN. v 

UN a.m. Ml p.m. IT. Amherst ar. 9M a.m. Ml Ml. 

IJW .. «.4» » ar.r.jn,er It. MJ - 7.M 

,000 •• Ml " 'v. Palmer ar.7.36 7.3f. 

10 . M .. 8.01 '• ar. Worcester 1t.«.M J.W 

1150 •' !).<» " ar. Boston lv. ft.OO VOO 



C. L. Rice, address 153 West 130th St., 
ork City with the Weston Electric Co. 
— J. H. Belden, Insurance business, New 
^^. Conn. 

H. L. Bodfish. Engineer for N. Y., N. H. &. 
Derby, Conn. 
U-H. A. Paul. Division of Forestry, Washing- 
ton. D. C. 

'02*— C. I. Lewis, teacher of science and vice- 

ANt> THK • 

tiik m rftatftinari Princ'P 81 Rockland High school. Rockland. 
fllOanp UaUlUtiy, . 02i __ E . b. Saunders, traveling salesman for Swift 

Which is always Open. 



IU9 ... 

BcrksbirtH r 
bills . 



Fothrlhrl , te „. fc a..-K.,, t .»..««.«-»'--."- s - <,p ' A -' BMM ' ,u ' 



\J£, 9 — \ J . D, JdUHUCIO, lidVUllll^ jai^Jiiinii iw» wtv»i» 

Bros, and Co., Bangor, Me. Address. Care Bangor 
Beef Co 
'02<— L. C. Claflin, Media, Del. Co,. Penn. 



I 



She HEIR 

totheFARM^ 



*A 



!/ 



Will make thoold farm pay 
If he farms the farm in the 
modern way. 

I Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

thought by Malt. 

A ihoroiiKh and practical course, 
wider tin' direct rliiime of Wm. I'. 
Brooks. Ph. 1).. (Msessrhtustti Au- 
ricaltursl Collate)' Ow course is 
baaed on "Brooks' Apiculture;" ii 
In is of soils, plants, tillage, drain- 
aia.irrigation.tnanarea.fai tiliaation, 
crop rotation ami everrthlna per- 
taining to Boney-makini on tho 
I 1 in. Teltbooka (3 volumes, Htxi 
1 .itics, 30O illustiatinns) free to Ma 
dents, Bend for 3<. pane book de- 
scribing courao in full. 

Home 

Correspondence 
Schools, 

Spring field. Maj $. 



othiT CoiirM": Iiunliiow. Bhnrthand, 
riiiiiiaiwliiji. Typawrltina;. Norma.1 

OllUrM- till* foi 



arteeenei s osi tiiirat*'. 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGER, 

200 Broadway, New Yohk. 



Club anil Colletfe 1' In sand Rings. 
Gold and Stiver Medals. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry. 



"UP TO THE MINUTE" 



IN 



MEN'S FINE SHOES, 
The Northampton Shoe Co., 



88 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MaH". 







' Mk 




I ! : ;: 







60 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'02.— L. A. Cook, poultry farmer, Millis. 

'02.— J. M. Dellea and C. E. Dwyer, Arbor Lodge, 
Nebraska City, Neb. 

'02.— V. A. Gates, with Scott Mayer Commission 
Co.. Wholesale Fruits and produce. 403-412 East 
Markham St., Little Rock, Ark. 

•02.— J. C. Hall. Farmer. Sudbury. 

-02.— C. M. Kinney, Musical Student, 84 North 
St., Northampton. 




ltvt*rcolW£i&-tc. 




Write a Note 

to Johnson 

wbeu you want a book, a picture, ion stationer? 
or anything else worth having. 

Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AMD ART DEALER, 

Bprlngflold, Km. 



313-315 Main St., 



An automobile club is being formed at Yale. 
Columbia offers nine courses in Chinese this year. 
Harvard has a credit balance of $24,134 from this 

year's sports. 

English has been made a compulsory subject of 

study in Austrian schools. 

The profits of the Yale- Harvard game amounted to 

$30,000 of which each took half. 

It is reported that Cornell will not send a crew to 

the Henley regatta at London this year. 

Following are the numbers of the entering classes 

in a few colleges : 

California, 600 

Purdue, 400 

Pennsylvania, 350 

Yale, 340 

Smith, 325 

Wellesley, 293 

Amherst. 1 10 

Trinity. 



HENRY Ar>iVMi 

PHARMACIST. 



NO. 1 COOK'8 IlEOCK, 



AMHERST, MAI 




Pure Drugs and Medicines, 



FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED ASb 
DOMESTIC CIGARS. CIGARETTES. ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND URIAH PIPES, KISIIING TACKL 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metnlllc Cartridge! for Pistols. Sporting and Sprlngfie l.l rttj 

Sunday ami night call * responded to at residence, first si 

west of Chase's niock. 



Trade Mark* 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
Quickly ascertain our opinion free whet her an 
i,rnnlnn II nrotmMv patentable. Communica- 
tion sHctly Kiifldentfal. Handbook on 'Menu 

Patents taken through Munn A Co. receive 
tpreial notice, without charge, in the 

Scientific American. 

A Handsomely Illustrated weekly. J£r«Hrt ejr; 

^teaBrTaUwaL|Sw 

MUNN &Co. 36,Bro ' d ^ New York 

"Branch Office"** V BU Washington. D. C. 



HOTEL HEIIMKIIMG 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

first Ulaaa Lunch. Koou.h •1.00 ; ami "P^ rtl »i wllh " 
tLMtoKMO. Double, •2.S0; with Bath, •> 00. 

IS Lyman St., op P o»lf Vniom Depot, »l hi**. « 

Telephone, 459-3. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



>L. XIII. 



AMHERST. MASS., DECEMBER 17, 1902. 



NO. 6 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
. j awm.™ nested to contribute Communications should be addressed. College Signal, Amhsrst. Mass. Ths Sional will be 
t^^a^r, «rr^ ^sT^ SSZSmZ* ~ »* Subscribers who do no, rece.ve their paper regularly are revested te 

ky the Business Manager. „ . 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903, Editor-in Chief. 
WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN. 1903, Business Manager. 
HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. 1904. Assistant Business Manager. 
NF.L FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903. College Notes. HENRY JAMES FRANKLIN, 1903, Alumni Notes. 

RICHARD HENDR^E ROBERTSON. .903. FAYETTE D.CK1NSON COUDEN. .904. Athletics. 

R RAYMOND RAYMOTH .904. Department Notes. ARTHUR LEE PECK, .904, IntercoMegiate 

JeORGE HOWARD ALLEN. .905. * HERBERT HAROLD GOODENOUGH. .905. 



"Ter^e7»T.O^e7aearlnTd^c£jln8l. Copies.. 10c. Pot— ■ outside •# United States and Ca nada, 2»c. ertri. 



I. C. A. 

L-Bal. Association, 
Ige Boarding Club, 
lir.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAX'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottinghsm. Pres. Athletic Association. 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. Base- Ball Associat ion, 

C. P. Halligan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred ind Four Index. 

R. H. Robertson. Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec 
J. G. Cook, Manager. 
A. L. Peck. Manager. 
H. L. Knight. Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Edi-tb rials. 



is encouraging to note the success which has 
the first two of the proposed series of informal 
es. Although not so large as might have been 
:cied the number of attendants have been suffi- 
|tly large to make a financial success and to 
•e the continuance of the series. The benefit to 
lerived from these affairs can hardly be overesti- 
:d. Inasmuch as they lend a stimulus to our social 
hlch is furnished by no other one thing. With a 
:r attendance at these dances will come an 
IncSased interest in the other social functions of the 
college and a greater probability of their success. 



.. - -- MAmnr N, ' Hr cn>° n sut 

COOLBY'S HOTEIa,si k,„«kieh., ■ 

IIKNKY K. MAKSII, Proprietor. 

All the modern conveniences. First class a 
modations for 300 guests. 

RESTAURANT ON THE EC HOPE AN PLAN. 




e decided cold snap of last week made a " snap " 
r. Wallace and his assistants in the heating sta- 
an utter impossibility for the time being. 
High a steam pressure of seventy-five pounds was 
iained In both boilers, an effort to keep a four 
pressure in the heating system was unsuccess- 



ful on account of a defective reduction valve. For 
this cause and owing to the fact that the pipe which 
furnishes North College with steam was improperly 
connected with the main, both of which are receiving 
attention by the steam fitters, the temperature in 
some of the buildings, especially in North College, 
was not conducive to the comfort or to any lauditory 
remarks from the students. The engine and dynamo 
was started for the first time last week and failed to 
generate the required current, owing to the Imperfect 
adjustment of the compensation. Therefore the power 
furnished by the town will be used for a short time. 
The capacity of the station when in perfect running 
order will be to heat 30000 cubic feet of radiation, 
and to furnish an electrical current sufficient for 900 
sixteen candle power lights. 

The need of a press club in this institution 
impresses itself upon us with greater force each time 
we chance to see the college mentioned In the daily 
papers. We have not the space to cite the numerous 
mistakes and false statements concerning us, which 



62 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



63 







have appeared in the press during the past year, and 
the variety of names under which we labor would do 
credit to a Spanish nobleman. So long as we stand in 
the background and make no move towards rectifying 
these errors just so long will we be misrepresented by 
the press By our inaction in regard to the matter we 
appear to give our tacit consent to what is published, 
whether it is right or wrong. The press club in other 
colleges is doing the work which it might be doing 
here. It is placing institutions before the great mass of 
preparatory students in the best light possible and has 
become an advertizing agent of no small importance. 
Very rarely, if ever, do we see mention of our college 
in the New York periodicals and even in the Boston 
papers we do not claim the space which by every right 
belongs to us. Now, before the basketball season 
opens, is the time to organize a press club in this col- 
lege and we would like to see the matter taken in 
hand by the students. 



doing the business of the state expeditiously and sens ^ 
bly he will be a positive force. It needs more men tj 
go to Boston impressed in advance with the notio^ 
that less words, less law. less change, less special ltg| 
islation are the absolute essentials for Massachusett 
supremacy as a leader of the States." 



In the election of Dr. J. B. Paige as representative 
to the General Court the voters have not only paid a 
high compliment to the man but to the department of 
which he stands as the head and to the college in 
which he has labored with such good results: for it is 
in his position of teacher, writer and promoter of the 
interests of this college .that perhaps as much as in any 
other way he has commended himself to the public 
eye. Among the numerous newspaper articles concern- 
ing Dr. Paige's election we take pleasure in reprinting 
one from the Hampshire Gazette of Nov. 5. " Professor 
Paige of Amherst gets the largest majority of any of 
the candidates in Hampshire county, only four less 
than 600. He proved an acceptable candidate and 
will be a valuable legislator, as he has the faculty of 
doing business with his fellow men without any useless 
words or forms. Few men ever connected with the 
Agricultural College have so splendidly united the 
imparting of knowledge to the students and the ability 
to do the ordinary business of life with ease, speed and 
economy as Professor Paige. He will get better 
acquainted with the manner of doing business in the 
Legislature in the first three weeks than the average 
new man would in a whole session. In securing leg- 
islation favorable to the Agricultural College he can 
be of little service as that institution has seemed to 
be able to get about all it wanted, but as a help to 



THE 1904 INDEX. 

The 1904 Index appeared for sale Monday after 
noon. Dec. 15, and is a publication which refled 
much credit upon the board of editors and upon thj 
class. In size it varies but little from last yean 
Index numbering 196 pages with 21 pages of adverj 
tisements. The volume is bound In brown cloth, id 
tered with gold and is dedicated to the alumni. Thl 
artistic features are worthy of commendation. Th 
drawings by C. A. Tinker and one by W. A. Smi: 
preceding the Y. M. C. A. page are of high quality] 
In the excellence of its typography and illustrations 
easily surpasses the production of last year. In thl 
editorials the McCobb case is dealt with vigorous, 
A plea for the renewal of the Forensic and Gle 
clubs and "The Cut System " are worth reading. 

Two pages are devoted to Coach Jennings and 
photograph of his " strap " is reproduced. An origj 
nal feature of the book is an Illustration showing tr.| 
class arranged so as to form the figures '04. For tr* 
first time in the history of the Index the picture of 
'varsity basketball team is shown. 

The college events embrace the usual mixture: 
fun and pathos and then come the " grinds," caus: 
as ever. The Individual records of the class are w 
written up and last but far from least we find ' 
alumni lists revised. 

Congratulations to the Class of *04. 



CALENDAR. 

Dec. 18. Basketball game, '03 vs. '06. Y. M. 
A. meeting, topic " Forgiveness." 

Dec. 19. Basketball game '05 vs. '06. A. 
Sharp. President of the Massachuse^ 
Fruit Grower's Association speaks bef: 
the Horticultural Seminar on "Srwl 
Fruits." 

Dec. 21. Chapel exercises at 9-15 a. m. Mee" 
of Y. M. C. A. at 2-30 p. m. 

Dec. 24. College closes for Christmas vacation 
10-15 A. M. 



AN EPISODE. 

(Continued from December 3.) 

•• Of all horrible experiences," said Florence, as 

Ithey entered the driveway, " I do think that was the — 

queerest." Which was very definite, as all such 

statements are apt to be coming from the feminine 

I side. 

Yes. I suppose you two thought you were the only 
lones that needed help ; judging from appearances. 
lYou're doing amazingly well for one who pretends to 
[dislike anything belonging to the other gender," 
Ichuckled Frank, as he shot a sidelong glance at 
|Cyrll. 

Well, I — ." began Florence. 
Oh, I know you did. That's all right." inter- 
rupted Frank, with a smile. 

And Cyril couldn't help admiring the blush that 
tinged her neck and check. 

" Jove," he said, looking at the remnants in his 
und, " I suppose I can buy a hat in this in " — he 
paused. " town of yours. But I say does this thing 
xcur often. By Jove, I'd sacrifice another hat to go 
[hrough it again." 

Now, I think that's mean of you, Mr. Wo'.vert," 
lid Florence, — but she didn't look very cross. 
Cyril sprang from the carriage as It stopped before 
Ihe house and turned to help his fair partner to the 
rround, but had to bite his lips in vexation as he saw 
^er spring from the other side. 

"Thank you," she said, "but this is so much 
|icer." Which was again very definite. 
"Yes. Mamsie, we're all here, safe and sound," 
le exclaimed as she sprang up the steps and greeted 
:r mother as though she were the one who had ar- 
|ved after a long absence. " And this is Mr. Wol- 
irt. whom we have been expecting. " Mother." she 
[hispered, •' he's not half as bad as we've pictured 
|lm. — Mr. Wolvert. my mother. 
" I suppose, there's some room for me here too. 
l't there," cried Frank throwing his arms around his 
pother's neck. •• Ah, it seems good to see you all 
fcain, and be at the dear old home." 
And a dear old home it was to them all, as even 
fr\\ was forced to admit, before his visit was done, 
i seemed like a big rest to him, wearied as he was 
the formal and insincere conventionalities of his 
W city life. Here was a condition of society of 



which he had read, thought and even dreamed, but 
which he had never experienced. Indeed more than 
once he had pictured a like condition in his fancy, 
only to become disgusted with the whole impossible 
fabric, and to look upon life with the narrow vision of 
the pessimist. Is he a stranger to you, reader, or do 
you not meet him but too often crossing your path } 

Is there happiness in the world, dees he seek to 
find it ? Or does he not rather cloud over the very 
sunshine with his gloomy outlook? Is he not the one, 
who continually cries, " all is vanity, all is false, there 
is no truth. There is but the eternal craving to sat- 
isfy the self ish desires of the animal. Chanty, love ? — 
show it to me. Ah, It exists not, but in the minds of 
the theorists. Sacrifice ? Yes, for gain, but not 
without." 

It was toward this that Cyril was drifting. A good- 
hearted fellow, full of life and action, but which for 
the most part was held In check, by a careless indif- 
ference, brought on as a result of the associations and 
surroundings of the artificial life in which he had early 
been placed. He had become accustomed to this 
one condition of social life and compared all others to It. 
He needed to breathe in the invigorating atmosphere 
that surrounds the true American hearth, from which 
radiates the spirit of the home life, with a genial 
warmth that thaws the most frosty hearted, and 
awakens the stupor-laden purpose to new and nobler 
aspirations. 

In such a home as this Cyril Wolvert, found him- 
self becoming interested in things which before had 
only tired him. He even became interested in him- 
self and was curious to know what the outcome would 
be. and what his friends would think of the change. 
He couldn't explain it. in fact he didn't try to ; it was 
all very pleasing, and he was satisfied to let It remain 
so. A philosophical treatment of the case might turn 
all the gold to sawdust again, and the pleasure vanish. 

" You play. I believe, Mr. Wolvert," said Mrs. 
Chadwick. as they entered the parlor ; " won't you 
favor us this evening." 

Cyril found himself willing to comply without a 
word. With a glance toward Frank, he seated him- 
self at the piano. There was a spirit of freedom In 
the air that stirred him, He felt that he was free ; 
here he could breathe and be satisfied. His muscles 
relaxed. He was at his ease. All the dormant 



1 






64 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

















power within him. seized the opportunity and sought 
light, and he did not resist. 

He began that dainty little" Slumber Song" of Beau- 
mont's ; and with a delicacy of touch that astonished 
even Frank, he glided into one of Chopin's Nocturne's, 
with Its dreamy carelessness. Now and then a weird 
phrase would startle the ear, and then melt away in a 
moonbeam of harmony. One of Bach's Fugues 
seemed to sing under his touch, where before it ap- 
peared but a meaningless repetition of discordant 
notes. And as he entered that magnificent poem of 
Beethoven's, the " Moonlight "Sonata, he forgot him- 
self, his surroundings, everything but the picture be- 
fore him. He saw the blind girl leave her seat be- 
fore the pianoforte, while the master himself took her 
place. He felt the spirit of the surroundings, — the 
humble hut, the four friends, the harmony of the divine 
chords as they issued from the soul of the master. 
He watched the fingers as they lovingly touched the 
white spots of the keyboard while the darkness settled 
as slowly as he played. He followed him into the 
second movement with a feverish haste and then 
burst into that glorious harmony of might and majesty 
as the darkness wrapped that little company in its en- 
folding protection, while the moonlight trickled softly 
through the master's fingers, and transfigured his face 
with a halo of divine light. 

Cyril bowed his head on the keys as he finished, 
then turned and took his seat. Not a word was 
spoken. There was no need of the meaningless 
words of praise he was accustomed to. Here was a 
response to the feeling he himself had experienced. 
Here was praise of the highest order. 

•• My boy," said Mr. Chadwick, breaking the si- 
lence, " that was magnificent. I never could under- 
stand what the Old Master's were driving at in their 
classical compositions. 1 could not appreciate their 
thought. I don't understand it yet, but I felt it to- 
night and it has given me a new pleasure." 

"Well, old man, how did you do it? I never sus- 
pected you of such a thing. I guess it's up to me. 
I've been looking for a change in you ; I think the 
change is needed here. But wait till you return, old 
chap, if I don't do a thing or two, I'm awfully mis- 
taken." exclaimed Frank. 

Florence said nothing but her face showed keenly 
the pleasure she had received. 



Bob, the youngest sideled up to Cyril, and laying 
his arms across Cyril's knees looked up into his face ; 
and the big brown eyes smiled at the gray. " I like 
you." he said. 

Such is the power of music. And yet we are told 
that the musicians themselves are the last ones to be 
affected by their own playing. Be that as it may ; 
Cyril felt the growing consciousness of a new inter- 
est in things; and thanked the lucky star that led him 
to the Chadwick's. And when the good-nights were 
given, Cyril went to a rest that was refreshing; a 
sleep that was a boon of peace. 

(To be continued.) 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



65 



BEYOND CURE. 

He is only a second fiddle 
In the orchestra of her heart ; 

Yet what cares he ? He loves her ! 
No matter how humble his part. 

She twists him around her finger 
And he cries out with delight ; 

With a wish of her curling tresses 
She can hold him tight. 

For she is the queen of his fancy 
And he is her lackey on call : 

She dismisses him when she pleases. 
His heart is a leather football. 

He is willing to be her footstool, 
Pingpong bat or any old thing. 



Contributed. 



A SKETCH. 

A winter's day is drawing to its close. The cold j 
stillness of night like a sentinel marching to his post! 
comes on to take its place on the never ending beat 
of time. In the west December's sun is sinking 
among the blue hills, to find as it were, a bed. among 
the sheltering valleys in which to find rest after the) 
wearing journey across the unbounded heavens. 

The golden band which has hung over the horizon] 
like a great illuminating screen, giving to the darken- 
ing clouds exquisite touches of purple and scarlet, nowi 
begins to withdraw from the scene of its glory an: 
Earth is left shrouded in the mantle of sombre gray- 
ness. 

For a time ominous stillness bears down upon the 
surroundings and each little sound seems even to in- 
crease in volume as it travels through the heavy 



oppressive atmosphere. Now. out from the northeast 
:omes a faint breeze, a chilling, penetrating breeze 
,'hich brings with it the dampness of an approaching 
S>torm. Little by little the starry firmanent is erased 
md a black mantle creeps en and on until the whole 
[ky is obscured and the grayness of night is changed 
ito pitchy blackness. 

As if to give warning of the approaching attack a 
:w snow flakes descend and lose themselves among 
ie dead grass blades ; then more come and are 
|riven by the increasing wind, whirling along through 
sace until with a whir and a gush the pent up storm 
jrsts upon us like a wild, voracious beast upon its 

;y. The air becomes thick with driven snowflakes 
id through the swaying branches and around the 
jildings the wind roars and shrieks in its mad on- 
(aught. Little eddys of snow are formed and from 
lem huge drifts grow, reaching out their sharp 
rested arms as if in search of shelter. 

Throughout the long night the elements rage in 
heir mad fury and when the first beams of light 
-raid the approach of another day, they cease in 
ild career as if fearful that their deeds would be 
sclosed. The wind ceases by degrees and the shrill 
[reech among the tree tops softens to a low moan- 
The great round sun, awakened from its slum- 
»r. climbs high in the eastern sky, and, reflecting 
|ck his beams of light as from a million lamps, there 
|s in its pure, frigid whitness. the winter's first snow 
intle. Vv\ 



WENTEENTH ANNUAL REUNION OF 
I MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

tOMiNENT Alumni Speak. President Goodell 
Unable to Attend. C. O. Lovell, '78, 
Presided. 

he seventeenth annual reunion and banquet of the 

Jssachusetts Agricultural College Club of New 

rk was held in St. Denis Hotel on the evening of 

Mth. Owing to the illness of President 

Jdell, Professor V/augh was sent as a representa- 

of the Faculty and opened the post-prandial 
:ches with a short discourse on ■ Agricultural 
fcation," suggesting that •• Agricultural " In this 



sense was emphasized too much and that " Educa- 
tional Agriculture " better met the requirements of a 
comprehensive term. 

James H. Webb. 73. instructor In law at Yale 
University, next spoke of his experiences as manager 
of a dairy farm and of the general work of the college 
in the past and present. He also spoke of the great 
field open for a department of landscape gardening in 
in the college. 

The unexcelled opportunities offered by the college 
for a preparation in medicine was emphasized by J. 
E. Root, 76. He stated that were he to again enter 
college with the interest to pursue medicine as a pro- 
fession, he would prepare in Massachusetts in prefer- 
ence to any other college. 

E. P. Felt, '91, State Entomologist of the state of 
New York, made a strong and eloquent plea for the 
support of the College Signal and expressed regret 
that the paper was not represented at the meeting. 
In his remarks he made the statement that the under- 
graduate training given at Massachusetts Is superior 
to that of many larger colleges. 

J. A. Cutter, M. D., a graduate in the class of '82, 
made a plea for the support of the Athletic Associa- 
tion and spoke of the deficit in the alumni subscrip- 
tions of this year. 

Dr. Paige spoke extendedly upon the development 
of the college and waxed eloquent and humorous as 
he touched upon the special courses now offered to 
members of the fair sex. He put forth strong argu- 
ments in favor of an extended course in landscape 
gardening and for short courses In bee and poultry 
culture. His speech embraced a large amount of 
data and was of a convincing type. 

John F. Winchester. D. V. S., told what the col- 
lege had done for the cause of science and spoke 
extendedly upon the honorable positions held by our 
alumni. Among the other speakers of the evening 
were Former Professor Washburn, J. F. Barrett, 75. 
J. B. Minn, 73. and Homer L. Coles, 71. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing 
year: CO. Lovell, 78, president; W. M. Eaton, 
'86, first vice-president ; W. B. Morse, '95, second 
vice-president ; A. L. Fowler, secretary and treasurer; 
J. A. Cutter, '82. historlar, ; and J. E. Root, 75. 
choragus. 



IT 

I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



IBFORXAL DAHCE 



HORTICULTURAL SEJUJAR- 

. . - - - "*- -~: ■-. :: :* 



v i 



■V 







■OH 

feats 



-_- 



3 «e 

- t -j: : : 



5 • 



SCss 



i . ; - - - 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




lbstrJation$p^C onc ' u S' on $ 



The observer has often sought advice as to the best 
ityle in which to write his effusions, and he has received 
iany differing ideas as to the matter. There seems 
|o be a feeling that the free use of slang— college 
Lang— would add to the general interest in the columns 
Ind this impression seems to be borne out by the fact 
[hat slangy novels, stories and sketches of the Billy 
Baxter order have become so popular with that portion 
If the reading public which delight in literature of the 
ighter sort within the last few years. Indeed a new 
biass of literature If the observer may be excused for 
tailing it that, seems to be in process of formation. 
There are the English school boy tales which see m to 
lind favor in proportion to the number of times that one 
If the characters had " jolly, well better" go and do 
[omething or other. There are the stories of toughs 
brho use more slang words and phrases in a minute ; 
Iven than " dey can frow mugs of old musty into 
^eirselves " in the same space of time ; and there are 
he slangy stories written by people who would feel 
nsulted if you told them they did such a vulgar thing 
i to use slang. The observer may be In a class of 
)0M who use slang without knowing it, but heretofore 
Le has never sought very hard for an expression of that 
Ml when something else would better fit what he has 
lad to say. The truth of the matter is that the observer 
las read so many sketches in which there was such an 
Ivident desire to use rather poorly fitting expressions 
H the sake of the slang effect, that he has concluded 
be a little chary of how he handles that particular 
ranch of the English language. Somebody has said— 
sn't it Victor Hugo?— that slang Is the language of 
isery " or " darkness " or something or other. Now 
\t observer is not at all miserable, or anything near it, 
although he sometimes uses slang, it isn't on that 
at in the least. All those who write slang are 
M necessarily ■■ miserable'* although some of them 
-a'.e a •■ miserable " attempt at trying to make the 
ftder believe they are. They usually succeed in 
reader swear which is worse than slanging. 
• • • * • 

Did you notice the final word in the last paragraph > 
| Slanging." It is just the word for the place and If 
: observer was an authority on the English tongue it 



would probably pass muster. As It is, It ought to be 
read with an interrogation mark, although If each and 
every reader would use the word on each and every 
possible occasion, it would probably find Its way into the 
dictionaries before many years. Common usage Is all 
that is needed to get a new word into the dictionaries, 
ycu know. The observer has no hope however in this 
case. Many years ago, he thought to try just out of 
curiosity how many years it would take to get an 
entirely new word into everybody's mouth. For that 
reason, he invented one at hap-hazard. The word is 
••salutions" ; and for four or five years now the observer 
has used it whenever he has thought of It. He did not 
assign any particular meaning to it. but left that to a 
more inventive mind than his own. There ought to be 
reason to believe that by this time the word would be 
popular and the observer would not have been at all 
surprised to find that It was derived form the Latin 
Si'ut etc.. or the Greek something or other by this 
time. As the matter stands however the word Is still 
used but by one person, as far as that one person 
knows ; and even he does not use it so much now as 
formerly. 

• • • • * 



The observer has been reading over the above, and 
he has observed that although this column is headed 
•■ Observations and Conclusions," he never thinks of 
calling himself the " Concluder." Perhaps th* rea- 
son for this fact is that he very seldom does conclude 
anything. Why not change the heading to read 
•• Observations " then, you ask. The answer is simple. 
While the observer observes and tells you just a few 
of his observations, it is for you, dear reader, to con- 
clude. Sometimes something appears in this column 
which is expected to be taken in a little more serious 
manner than that in which It appears to be written. 
No. that isn't the case this week. All this is written 
. up space rather than to cause anybody to draw 
any conclusions. To tell the truth the editor-in-chief 
came to the observer to-night In a great stew. He 
said that there was a dearth of material for this Issue 
of the SiGMAL, and that the observer must make an 
extra effort to fill up with " something or other." The 
above is the - something or other." The observer to 
be sure said something to the effect that his lesson In 
Physics for the morrow is still unlearned but the 









68 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









editor-in-chief, bothered Physics or did something 
worse to it. and the observer agreed with him in his 
own mind and did not say him nay. The observer 
can look the editor-in-chief in the face in the morn- 
ing, but — oh, the first hour and the Physics professor. 



69 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL. 

The series of basketball games, between the sev- 
eral classes are not only of interest in bringing out a 
healthy spirit of rivalry among the classes themselves, 
but serve a good purpose in developing a team to 
represent the college during the coming winter, and 
thus in keeping alive the interest of the entire student 
body in our athletic relations with other colleges. 
Four of the six games scheduled in the series have 
already been played. To-morrow evening the junior and 
sophomore teams will come together and on Friday 
evening the last game of the series will be contested 
by the Sophomores and Freshmen. Owing to the 
fact that this latter is one of the four athletic events 
in which the two underclasses compete, the result of 
this game in particular will be of great interest to the 
students in general. This interest is heightened be- 
cause of the fact that while the Sophomores won the 
rope-pull, the Freshmen evened up matters on the 
gridiron ; and as this is the last opportunity for a com- 
parison of tha two classes until the base-ball game in 
the late spring, both teams may be expected to fight 
hard for the victory. 

Accounts of three of the games already played ap- 
pear below : 

'03—7. '05—4. 
In a poorly played game showing lack of practice on 
both sides, the Seniors began the series by defeating 
the Sophomores by the above score. The result of 
the game was in doubt until the end. Cook and Har- 
vey did the best work for the Seniors while Whitaker 
and Hunt played best on the other side. The line up : 
•03 -os 

Harvey. 1. f. r . b.. Taylor 

Cook, 1. b. r , f.. Whitaker 

Snell, c. c.. Munson 

Franklin, r. b. 1. f,, Brett 

Tottingham. r.f. 1. D-i Hunt 

'04 vs. "06. 
The Juniors defeated the Freshmen on Dec. 6. 
The Freshmen put up a very poor game, their worst 



fault being their failure to cover their opponents. The 
Juniors played their usual fast game, their passing 
and goal throwing being almost fautless. They scored 
24 points in the first half and 26 in the second, and 
held their opponents down to three baskets. The 
final score was 50 to 6. The game was a remarka- 
bly clean one for a class game and very few fouls 
were called. The line-up : 
•04 

Quigley, 1. f. 
Ahearn. 1. b. 
White, c. 
Griffin, r. f. 
Fulton, r. b. 

'04—18. '03—17. 
The result of the game on Dec. 9th 
Seniors and the Juniors was much of 
From the previous records of the two teams it was 
believed that the Juniors would have no trouble in 
winning. On the contrary, however, they won but by 
a single point and that at the very end of the game. 
The Seniors played much better ball than in their 
game with the Sophomores while the junior team 
showed the results of over-confidences. The game 
was a rough one, but full of interest to the spectators 
for all that, perhaps in this case, because of it. The 
teams lined up as follows : 
•04 
Quigley. 1, f. 

Ahearn, 1. b. 



'06 

b„ Kennedy 

r. f., Farrar 

c. Spurr 

I. b.. Wood 

1. f., Colton 

between the 
a surprise. 



r. b.. Cc:.< 



r. f. 



I Tottingham 
)' Proulx 

c. SmI 



I. f.. Fra 
1. b.. Harve- 



White, c. 
Fulton, r. b. 
Griffin, r. f. 

The game last evening between the Seniors an. 
Freshmen was played too late for its result to appear 

in this issue. At this writing the standing of the 
teams is as follows : 

Teoms Won Lost Per cer- 

1904 2 irjCC 

1903 1 1 : v 

1905 1 or 

1906 , ooc 



Professor St. John of Oberlin college gives a new 
arithmetical table adapted to modern business ideas : 
Ten mills make one trus; . 
Ten trusts make one combine , 
Ten combines make one merger , 
Ten mergers make one magnate : 
On* magnate makes all the money. 



Collect Notts- 



— See the basket-ball schedule ! 

— The dance held last Friday was very sucecssful. 

— President Goodell who has been ill the past week 
is rapidly improving. 

Miss H. L. Hyde of the freshman two year special 
class has left college, She intends to travel. 

— A tax of $1.50 per man has been levied on the 
student body to support the basket-ball team. 

— Prof. Petit's hop which was to have taken place 
January 2 will be postponed until after college opens. 

— The new Army Bill which will come before the 
present congress has a direct bearing on every man in 
this college. . 

— H. L. Knight. Assistant Instructor in chemistry, 
has been called home to the bedside of his father who 
is seriously ill. 

— The new boarding house will be opened after the 
holidays. The house will be run under the direct sup- 
pervision of the faculty. 

— The lowest temperature reported by the observer 
at the weather station occurred on the night of Dec. 8 
being 15 degrees below zero. 

— N. H. Ingham. '05. who had his leg broken in the 
Freshman-Sophomore football game has been moved 
to his home in Granby, Massachusetts. 

— Damage to the amount of $200 was done at the 
plant house on the night of Dec. 2 by the bursting of 
a boiler and the subsequent freezing of a large number 
of plants. 

— It will interest our readers to know that Mayor 
elect Everett E. Stone of Springfield is a brother of 
Professor George Stone. He Is a graduate of Worces- 
ter Academy. 

— A course of reading involving the " Theory of 
Evolution " will be taken up by some of the graduate 
and senior students in the department of Entomology, 
during the remainder of the year. It Is planned to 
meet weekly at the home of Prof. H. T. Fernald. 

— The college buildings are now being heated and 
lighted from the central heating station. The reading- 
room lights will be repaired just as soon as " chain- 
lightning" Wallace can attend to them. 



— Prof. F. A. Waugh spoke at the alumni banquet 
at New York last Thursday and is billed to speak before 
the " Association Pomiologique de la Providence de 
Quebec" to-morrow. Hissubject is " Quelques notions 
sur l'Emondage." 

— The new song. - Sons of Old Massachusetts " 
written by H. L. Knight '02 is being published by the 
Chadwick Music Publishing Co. of Westfield, The 
music will be arranged for the orchestra and the band. 
C. A. Tinker ex- '04 is completing a cover design and 
the song will undoubtedly be in the hands of the 
students directly after the holidays. 

JOURNAL CLUB MEETING. 

Owing to the fact that college exercises were held 
on Saturday, Dec. 6, the monthly meeting of the 
Journal club was postponed until the following Mon- 
day. At this meeting Dr. H. T. Fernald called at- 
tention to three recent bulletins by Dr. Marlett treat- 
ing upon the house centepede, the silver fish and the 
white ants. He also discussed to some length a 
paper, by Prof. Kellogg of Johns Hopkins University, 
with reference to the mouth parts of insects. 

Mr. Morrill reported upon recent experiments in 
spraying for the San Josd scale, and quoted state- 
ments of A. F. Burges. '95, with regard to the lime, 
sulphur and salt wash with which excellent results 
have been obtained. 

The report of R. I. Smith, '01, and A. L. Qualnt- 
ance of the Maryland Experiment Station with regard 
to egg the laying capacity of the Plum Cucullo was 
given by H. J. Franklin. 

D. N. West read an article upon " The Bestowing 
of Common Names to Insects." 

An account of the depredations of the Palm and 
Palmetto weevils upon the cocoanut palms in British 
Honduras, together with a report of the damage done 
to ornamental and shade trees during the past sea- 
son of different speces of Tomlcus was given by M. 
H. West. 



It has been suggested that the new observatory 
which Amherst college is about to build, be placed 
upon the Holyoke range. 

Contracts have been awarded for the building of 
Vanderbllt and Kirtland halls at Yale. 






70 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



, • 







\ 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE. 

Jan. 10. Harvard at Cambridge. 

12. Northampton Y. M. C. A. in Drill Hall 
14, Amherst in Pratt Gymnasium. 

17. Ludlow Athletic Club in Drill Hall. 
22, University of Vermont in Drill Hall. 

24, Brown University at Providence. 
31, Open. 

Feb. 14. Southbridga Y. M. C. A. in Drill Hall. 

18. Williams at Willlamstown. 

25, Open. 

28, Delphi Athletic Club in Drill Hall. 

March7, Holy Cross at Worcester. 

14, Fitchburg Y. M. C. A. in Drill Hall. 



Spring Clothes. 



Just the sorts that young men will appreciate. 
There's a collection here that absolutely cannot 
be found elsewhere in Western New England. 
Will you come and see It? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 



A joint challenge has has been issued by the chess 
clubs of Oxford and Cambridge universities to the 
chess clubs of the universities of Harvard. Yale, 
Princeton and Columbia for a cable match to defend 
the Rice trophy, to take place in the spring of 1903. 



Haynes & Co., 



Springfield, 



A Iways Reliable. 



Mass. 




PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 



DAILY SERVICE. 



New York 

Central 

Lines 



To ALBANY, 
To BUFFALO, 
To CHICAGO, 
To CINCINNATI, 
To DETROIT, 
To ST. LOUIS, 



9 Trains 
8 Trains 
7 Trains 
3 Trains 
5 Trains 
3 Trains 



THROUQH COACHES 

BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



SLEEPINO CARS 



DINING CARS 



EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 

TO AND FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER, 

AS FOLLOWS ! 



RKAI> DOWK. 

0.06 A.M. 6.02 P.M. 

».ftO " 6.4ft " 
10.00 " 6.58 " 
10.SO " 8.01 " 
1180 " 9.0S " 



It. Amherst 
nr. Palmer 
iv. Palmer 
ar. Worcester 
ar. Boston 



KEAD UP. 
nr. 0.06 A.M. 8.36 P.M. 



lv.8.20 
ar. 736 
lv.6.2S 
\v. 5.00 



7..M 
7.36 
6.10 
5.00 



I Through the 

Famous . . . 

Berkshire 

mils . . . 

AN1> THE 

fllbanp (iatcwap, 

Which is always Open. 



For further information, time tables, etc., call on ticket a K ents or address, A. S. HANSON, O. P. A., Boston, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Al 



umm, 



'81.— Dr. A. D, Peters delivered an address of very 
timely interest on the foot and mouth disease of cat- 
tle before the state board of agriculture at their mid- 
winter open meeting. Dr. Peters described the dis- 
ease and gave as its probable cause, here at the pres- 
ent time, contagion from cattle from Europe or from 
infected straw used for bedding, although the cause is 
not certain. He estimated the number of cases in 
this state, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Ver- 
mont, at the present time, as about fifteen hundred. 
He spoke of the serious blow to the New England 
cattle interests which it involved and said that, even 
If it were stamped out at once, the normal condition 
of exports in cattle would not be reached again for 
some months. Co-operation on the part of farmers 
and cattle raisers he gave as the chief need in the 
efforts that are being made to prevent Its spread and 
to stamp it out as qnickly as possible. Dr. Peters is 
chief of the cattle bureau of the state. 

'90. — We are pleased to note the marriage of C. 
H. Jones, Head Chemist at the Vermont Experiment 
Station, to Miss Fannie Kimball of Amherst. 

'91.— In the Report of the New York State Ento- 
mologist for the year 1902. E. P. Felt has published 
bulletins No. 53 and 57 of the New York State 
Museum. The first of these bulletins is on the Elm 
Leaf Beetle and is a revision of a former bulletin by 
the same author. It consists of about 43 pages with 
eight plates. The second bulletin Is the Seventeenth 
Report of the New York State Entomologist on 
injurious and other insects of the state of New York. 
It Is Illustrated by four plates and 29 text figures, one 
of the former being the work of the Assistant State 
Entomologist, C. M. Walker, '99. A reviewer in the 
Entomologist (London) says that •• these two recent 
bulletins maintain the high reputation of the publica- 
tions of the New York State Entomologist." Mr. 
Felt is also president of the Association of Economic 
Entomologists of America. 

'94.— Dr. Claude F. Walker of Montclalr, N. J., 
spent Thanksgiving day with his parents, Prof, and 
Mrs. C. S. Walker, In Amherst. 

'94.— Our sympathies are extended to A. H. Kirk- ' 
land on the sad occasion of the death of Mrs 
Kirkland. 



to the FARM 



Hi 



!/ 



Will make the old fnrm pay 

If In' fai ins tho furtu in the 
niuiluiii way. 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

Gau6h1 by Mail. 

A ihorouRh and practical course 
undei the direct charga "f Win p. 
ks, I'h. !>.. (Massachusetts Ar- 
ricultura] (Colli its). Our oMirsc is 
i' >■■' 'I i ii ' Urouks' Agriculture;" it 
in its of soils, plants, tillaia, drain- 
■ ■ .in igation.manurai )• - till cation, 

Crop II. I, HI., || ;in.l < v. I Wlliiii; ,„ ,- 

talning to monsy-maklnii i n thg 

rami, 'I vxt |„„,ks (.1 v.-li •■;. sno 

pa es, SOU illustrations) I'm- in sm- 
. s nd for .i<> page booh de- 
•Cfibuig counts in full. 

Home 

Correspondence 
•Schools, 

Springfield, Majj. 
Other Course: ItaMnem, Short a ami. 
Penmanship, Typewriting v.imhi' 
cmime lit* rorteacbci'Rotfrtlfli iti 



STEPHEN LANH FOLGBB, 

200 Broadway, New York. 



Club and College Pins and Kings. 
Gold and Silver Medals. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jgwelry. 



"OP TO THE 




n 



IN 



MEN'S FINE SHOES, 
The Northampton Shoe Go. 



NOHTHAMPTON, MaHS. 



7 2 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•95. H. D. Hemenway is connected with the 

Handicraft Schools of Hartford, being director of the 
School of Horticulture. He is, at present, in need 
of two men as instructors in Horticulture. Address, 
H. D. Hemenway, School of Horticulture, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

'96. H. W. Moore was in town recently. 

'96. A. B. Cook was in town recently. 

•96.— Albin M. Kramer and Miss Rose A. Dalton 
were united in marriage, Tuesday, Nov. 18, at Wor- 
cester. At home after January 1, 7 Heardsleigh St.. 
Worcester. 

•98. S. D. Wiley, address, 1517 John St., Balti- 
more, Md. 

'99, _W. A. Hooker, is at present making his home 
in town. 

•99. _C. M. Walker of Albany, N. Y. spent Thanks- 
giving day with his parents. Prof, and Mrs. C. S. 
Walker, in Amherst. 

•00.— Edwin K. Atkins and Miss Mary Almira 
Hobart were united in marriage at the home of the 
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Hobart of 
North Amherst, on the evening of Dec. 3. The cer- 
emony was witnessed by a large number of invited 
guests who were unanimous in expressing their opin- 
ion that it was one of the prettiest weddings they had 
ever seen. Mr. and Mrs. Atkins left Amherst on a 
wedding journey to extend as far west as Kansas City. 
After their return, they will reside in Northampton 
where Mr. Atkins is employed as civil engineer In the 
office of C. E. Davis. 

'00. H. C. Baker was in town recently. 

•00.— M. H. Munson formerly with Swift & Co. 
has entered the employ of George B. Robbins. trans- 
portation manager of the Armour Co. He is to 
manage a large dairy farm in Hinsdale, III. He is 
planning the erection of a large dairy barn. 

'00. Y. H. Canto was in town recently. 

Ex-'OI. — A letter has been received by one of the 
members of the senior class from W. B. Rogers. 
Mr. Rogers is now with his regiment in camp at Mon- 
terey, Cat., about four hours ride from San Francisco 
In his letter, he gives a short account of the situation 
about San Francisco. 



Write a Note 

to Johnson 



^W J 


1 v. 


n 


■M 


i)M 


^P 



when you want a book, a picture, some stationery 
or anything else wortli haviug. 



Henry R. Johnson 

BOOKSELLER AND ART DEALER, 



313-315 Main St., 



Springfield, Mass. 



HENRY ^Vr>AJVI«, 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, • ' AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 



rANCT AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night call.* responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



HOTEL HENKING. 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

First Class Lunch. Rooms $1.00 and upwards; with Ruth, 
$1.80 to $2.00. Double, $2.50; with Bath, $3.00. 

M. C. HBJVKIKO AS OO. 

IS Lyman St., oppvtlt* Union Oepot, Sprinafl+ld, Man*. 

Telephone, IBM. 



COOLEY'S HOTBL,8;s«VJ?K l ffi .S: 

HKNKY E. MAKSH, Proprietor. 



All the modern conveniences. First class accom- 
modations for 300 guests. 

RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 21, 1903. 



NO. 7 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

notify ths Business Manager. , 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903. Edltor-ln Chief. 
WILLIAM ETHERINCTON ALLEN. 1903, Business Manager. 
HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. 1904. Assistant Business Manager. 

NE ,uP R .Nc,sM r „ r .,,03.c o , r H„., *Sgg£g£gE&2£nTEL 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON. 1903. ARTHUR LEE PECK. 1904, Intercalate. 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, I9M. Department Notes. HERBERT HAROLD COODENOUCH. 1905. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN, 1905. 



-^TT, oo ,.r', M r to .dc.nc. Sl n ^o^*~^r^^t.l*. .« lilt* SfU. .nd <*..«■, Mc. .«tr.. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club. 
Readir.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottlngham, Pres. Athletic Association, 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. Base-Ball Association. 

C. P. Halllgan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

R. H. Robertson, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
J. G. Cook, Manager. 
A. L. Peck, Manager. 
H. L. Knight. Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Offlcs at Amherst. 



Ed i-to rials, 



The serial " An Episode " begun In the Signal 
Dec. 3, will be continued In our next issue. 

We would like to receive more contributions to our 
columns from the members of the Sophomore and 
Freshman classes. 



been for a long term of years an active member of the 
board of trustees and of a number of standing commit- 
tees connected with the college. It would seem that 
in no better way could the college authorities show 
their appreciation for the valuable services rendered 
by Mr. Draper than by naming this building, for which 
he has labored so diligently, •' Draper Hall." 



In speaking before the students during Chapel exer- 
cises a few mornings since, President Goodell expressed 
a wish that the new dining hall might be officially 
known as •• Draper Hall " in honor of Hon. James 
Draper of Worcester. Mr. Draper in the capacity of 
chairman of the committee on New Buildings and the 
Arrangement of Grounds, connected with this college, 
has shown great Interest and has put fourth much 
energy In securing funds for the erection of the build- 
ing. It has been through his efforts perhaps more than 
those of any other man that the much needed structure 
has been secured. Mr. Draper has long been con- 
nected with the college In various capacities having 



For the past few weeks athletic Interests about 
college have been centered on the Interclass and 
varsity games of basket ball. The student body has 
been well represented at these contests and indications 
point towards a good team to represent the college 
during the coming season. The manager has arranged 
the best schedule we have ever had and although the 
management is unfortunate in the condition of Its fin- 
ances, It is certain that the student body will not suffer 
this series of games to go by default. However, not only 
the players but also the spectators have expressed their 
dissatisfaction because of the poor lighting service in 
the Drill Hall. This is especially true on the north 
side of the floor, where darkness renders good playing 



74 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



75 






almost impossible. Since we have no well equipped 
gymnasium, and as the Drill Hall is the only building 
in which the students take exercise during the winter 
months let us hope that the college authorities will 
instruct our Electrician to replace the lights which 
have been broken and add as many more as may be 
needed. 



A commendable feature of the new Dining Hall 
management is the fact that the student body is to be 
represented on the overseeing committee. It is dif- 
ficult to imagine a body of men who more thoroughly 
appreciate affairs in general when they go right or who 
are more quick to show their dissatisfaction when 
matters go wrong, than a body of students. As to the 
matter of board, it is an established fact that there are 
few things which cause such a fluctuation of a person's 
humor as does the quality of the food which he eats. 
In as much as the students have a direct voice in the 
management of the new hall, complaints, if there are 
any, can receive immediate attention and difficulties 
can be adjusted with far greater expedition than would 
otherwise be the case. From the fact also that students 
are represented on the committee the question of 
student waiters can be more satisfactorily adjusted. 
This question is one which should command all due 
consideration. Formely the position of waiter has 
been held out as a strong inducement towards securing 
and retaining good athletes who could ill afford to spend 
the necessary time for training. To deprive the stu- 
dents of these positions or to fill the places with men 
who are not needy members of the athletic teams 
would tend to be a serious drawback to our athletics. 



that such is not the case at present. Through their 
efforts in its behalf the college Is year by year being 
raised in standard and excellence and Is becoming 
known and appreciated by the people of Massachusetts 
in a way similar to that which are the active state col- 
leges of the West. The booming of a college in New 
England is a difficult matter for the East is full of col- 
leges the merits of which are unquestionable ; but 
it is not to boom this college for which our trustees are 
striving. That it may rank high in scholarship and 
that it may furnish to its students such courses of 
study as shall make them of value in their professions 
and as citizens, is the primary object in the minds 
of the trustees. In the attainment of this object 
these men have a close second in the Faculty and it Is 
to these two bodies, which are really one inpurpose.that 
the tax payers of the state and their sons (and daugh- 
ters) who chance to be students at this college, owe a 
debt of thanks. 



It is with pleasure, with almost a sigh of relief, in 
fact, that we at last have the opportunity to publish an 
accepted course of study for this college which makes 
it possible for its students to more thoroughly perfect 
themselves along the line of their chosen professions. 
The movement towards this end began long ago and 
from the beginning, we are proud of say, the Aggie 
Life and later the College Signal have s?en its con- 
stant and earnest champions. It has been intimated that 
our trustees have been extremists in the way of con- 
servatism and that the best interests of the college have 
not been looked out for by them. However this may 
have heen in the past, we are having continued evidence 



A recent editorial in the New England Homestead 
calls attention to the fact that during the present year 
governor- elect Bates will be called upon to appoint two 
trustees of this college. The same editorial recom- 
mends a man, whom we do not know and whose name 
we have forgotten, as suitable for one of the vacancies 
on the ground that he is a farmer and a prominent 
agriculturist, having been a member for some years 
past of the state board of agriculture. It seems to us 
that the idea is altogether too prevalent that a trustee 
of our Alma Mater must of necessity be a farmer or 
an agriculturist and that the best recommendation for 
a man for the position is that he is a successful farmer. 
We think that the first requisite of a candidate for 
trustee of this college should be that he be an educator 
or one Interested in education. Save in exceptional 
cases he should be a college graduate, and preferably 
of M. A. C. In an institution of this kind where the 
object is to promote the liberal and practical education 
of the people the more widely diversified the occupa- 
tions of the various trustees the better able they will 
be to promote the interest of the college. Where 
could we find men better suited for the very responsible 
position of college trustee than among our own pro- 
fessional men. men of the legal profession, physicians 
and clerymen. The business men of our alumni are 
already admirably represented and we think it well that 



they should be. The point that we wish to make is 
that whenever a new man is appoin'ed to the board of 
trustees it should be because of his broadness of mind 
and education and general capability rather than of his 
occupation or interest in any particular occupation. 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 

It is well known here about the College that the 
Trustees and Prof. Waugh are making a special effort 
to build up the work In landscape gardening. The most 
recent evidence of this is the purchase by the Depart- 
ment of Horticulture of some surveying instruments, 
which arrived a short time since. These consist of a 
light builder's transit, a railroad compass with tripod, a 
small traverse plane table with alidade, and the usual 
equipment of chains, pins, leveling rods, ranging poles, 
etc. While there is nothing elaborate In any of the 
instruments they will answer very well for light survey- 
ing and will give the students in landscape gardening 
the means of doing a great deal of practical field work. 
It Is the plan to make the instruction in landscape 
gardening largely practical. Students will deal with 
actual field problems, making their own surveys on the 
ground. These surveys will include not only outline 
mapping, but leveling and general topographical work, 
the determination of grades, location of drives and 
walks, drainage, and all the other questions of practical 
engineering necessary to the business of the practicing 
landscape gardener. 



GRADUATE COURSES OF STUDY. 

The question to what extent our smaller colleges 
should Indulge In graduate work of a university nature 
is one which college men have considered worthy of 
discussion. Colleges such as Amherst, Williams, etc. 
do not as we understand them, look with favor upon 
the Idea of doing university work, neither have they 
any cherished ambitions or leaning towards the univer- 
sity idea. The individual opinions of men connected 
with these colleges are not. so far as we are familiar with 
them, such as approve of the granting of university 
degrees, and encouraging university work. Original 
research has been little encouraged as a rule by col- 
leges, especially by those that are termed classical. 
They do. however, develop scientific courses to a cer- 
tain extent. Our Institution, however, differs from 
the classical college in many important points. 



From the very first our institution has taken kindly 
to the Idea of research, inasmuch as the develop- 
ment of the scope of work undertaken by the college 
demanded it. The valuable experiments instigated 
by President Clark, Prof. Stockbridge and Dr. Goess- 
mann in the early period of the college are proof of 
this. Much research work was accomplished by our 
institution even before the experiment station was in 
existence. These are facts worth bearing in mind as 
showing the early trend of our college and they show 
moreover that at the very outset of the Institution's 
existence, a differentiation or modification of the 
older established classical or scientific courses was 
necessary. It may not be generally known, even 
among the alumni, that this institution offered for 
some years a graduate course under Dr. Goessmann 
and President Clark leading to the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy. No one, however, so far as known to 
us ever took this prescribed course, although Dr. 
Goessmann for many years had a number of gradu- 
ate students under his personal supervision. If the 
rather restricted and at times unstable courses offered 
then for advanced work were sufficient, are we not 
justified with our greatly enlarged equipment to offer 
such at the present time? Moreover, we now pos- 
sess an experiment station provided with funds, and 
with an excellent equipment which enables work to 
be carried on in a number of branches heretofore not 
attempted. However strong the research idea im- 
pressed itself upon the wise and able men connected 
with this institution at first, there can be no doubt 
about the necessity for agricultural experimentation at 
the present time, neither is there any doubt that the 
investigational and experimental feature has imbued 
the spirit of the institution to a considerable extent. 
So strong and important has the research feature be- 
come in the past years that the college assumes a 
secondary importance not only among farmers, but to 
our citizens in general. Where there is one man 
who knows about the college, there are fifty who are 
more or less familiar with the experiment station. 

As a college we are supposed to offer an 
equivalent degree to that offered by classical 
colleges. The basis upon which we are Incorpor- 
ated as we understand it demands this. It is. how- 
ever, the investigational feature previously alluded to 
that differentiates us more than anything else from 



7 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



77 




I 



II 

1 



the classical colleges and which puts us into the uni- 
versity class or type of Institutions, even if we do not 
maintain the university standard. Not only must the 
idea of experimenting pervade the institution but it 
must form a part and parcel of the logical graduates 
equipment, i. e., the farmer or modern agricultural 
specialist, Inasmuch as every fruit grower or market 
gardener must be continually experimenting in order to 
be successful. 

Here again we find important differences between 
the ordinary classical college graduates and agricul- 
tural college graduates, viz. in their vocational require- 
ments. Assuming that the nature, spirit, and scope 
of our work is different from other institutions who do 
not take kindly to the university idea, the question 
arises " Are we prepared to undertake such work ?" 

A very important feature connected with graduate 
study and in the conferring of a university degree by a 
college is equipment. If a college Is to do this work 
it must not only possess the necessary laboratory 
equipment, but what is more essential, it must pos- 
sess a faculty that Is thoroughly imbued with the 
scientific spirit, and composed of men who are ac- 
quainted with scientific literature in each branch of 
study, men who are qualified by knowledge and tech- 
nique, and who are gifted with a considerable amount 
of scientific accumen and intuitional attainments. It 
matters not how much text book knowledge a man 
may carry about in his cranium, nor how good an 
equipment or how much money he may have at his 
disposal for experimentation, if he has none of the 
other qualifications he is not prepared to do more 
than to impart an elementary knowledge of his sub- 
ject. Or in other words he becomes merely a text 
book instructor. It has long ceased to be a question 
whether such a man really can pretend to be a good 
scientific teacher, no matter how dignified, verbose, 
and fluent he may be. The modern idea of a scien- 
tific teacher is one who can inspire interest, enthusi- 
asm, thought and the spirit of investigation. At any 
rate the best scientific teachers that we can recall 
belong to this latter class. 

Assuming the ability and equipment to be in most 
respects ample for graduate work, there are other 
features which should be considered. A feature 
which some urge against smaller colleges, offering 
university work. Is their remote location from large 



centers of population, and the disadvantage of being 
restricted to a limited number of students, a larger 
number of which are undergraduates. To many there 
is a decided stimulus exerted in being brought in con- 
tact with a great mass of humanity representing all 
sorts of ideas and habits, for after all the individual 
must fit himself to the conditions in this world as they 
are, and not as he thinks he is going to make them. 
The relief from overwork which a large city offers In 
its splendid classical music, operas, theatres, churches, 
art collections, and lectures on various subjects is 
exhilarating, and constitutes a panecea for fatigue. 
Then again, according to some, there is an advan- 
tage offered by the large university in bringing the 
student in contact with a large variety of individuals 
representing various nationalities who are pursuing a 
great variety of subjects, and where every conceivable 
kind of genius is found. Of course what may be 
desirable for one student may not be for another and 
there appears to be two sides to this question. How- 
ever much one person may enjoy such associations 
and the help they may gain from them, there are 
many who claim, and rightly too perhaps, that the 
smaller Institutions are the best, inasmuch as in these 
more attention can be given to the student, and his 
individuality and requirements are better understood 
and cared for. The latter argument is one frequently 
used by college authorities for restricting the number 
of students to a small number. Whatever basis the 
argument may possess against the smaller classical 
colleges developing into universities, or attempting to 
do university work, it would seem that it does not ap- 
ply with so much force to special institutions like our 
own, which has from the very first been obliged from 
the nature of things to develop to more or less extent 
the university Idea of research and investigation. 

Since our institution derives large funds for experi- 
mentation, and since it is, or should be, largely im- 
bued with the research spirit, it is nothing more than 
logical that it should show greater development and 
sympathy along experimental lines, both in the college 
and station. Furthermore there are in this country 
no especially equipped higher institutions devoted to 
agricultural training, and our college stands pre-emi- 
nently alone as one devoted to pure agriculture. If 
the demand is made, as It has been, for advanced 
work by graduates of other institutions, is there any 



reason why it should not undertake to do it in the 
same spirit that it has already shown in instigating 
various elementary courses which it gladly offers for 
the betterment of the farmer's sons, or others who 
seek an elementary and practical knowledge. 

Every year the quality of experiment station work 
must increase, owing to the great advancements 
being made in agriculture in this country. The time 
is rapidly passing when second and third rate experi- 
mental work will be acceptable, neither can stations 
afford to spend money at the present time on superfic- 
ial experiments of little value to any one, or rehears- 
ing facts which have been known since the dawn of 
civilzation. The standard of experiment station work 
is improving, and must continue to do so, and such 
progress calls for men of university calibre. Since 
our station and college, are so intimately connected, 
and the work demands men and equipment of no 
mean order, it would appear that if we have not such 
means at our convenience, then we ought not to take 
up advanced work. On the other hand if we are not 
qualified to do advanced work, or if we fail in these 
requirements, our station and college is in danger of 
falling below that standard which progress demands, 
and it will be obliged to be restricted in its labor to 
first and second hand compilation and control work. 

The question whether we have a legitimate right to 
do university work therefore appears to depend largely 
upon the equipment of the men and the laboratories 
which they direct ; also upon whether the departments 
have the time to attend to such work ; whether the 
nature of the subject taught is sufficiently differenti- 
ated to warrant the giving of advanced degrees, and 
whether it can give a sufficiently broad and funda- 
mental undergraduate and graduate course equal to 
that of the majority of institutions. That our under- 
graduate course has been very deficient in many ways 
is well known. A great advance, however, was made 
in the adoption of senior electives, and In the new 
junior elective system now adopted there are many 
encouraging features. Owing to the nature of the 
institution the character of the work for advanced 
degrees will be entirely different from that given else- 
where at the present time. This constitutes an argu- 
ment in favor of undertaking such work. If we were 
to undertake the same kind of work that other institu- 
tions are doing, and which they can do better, the 



case would be quite different, and we believe it would 
be entirely out of our province to undertake such. 
We do not believe, however, that institutions 
have a legitimate right to give advanced scientific 
degrees in courses, for work which is not scien- 
tific, Unfortunately agricultural colleges have 
courses which have never been differentiated, neither 
have certain subjects become as a rule advanced 
enough at the present time to have a field they can 
call their own. In such Instances it would be better 
to let the student work along closely allied well differ- 
entiated lines under trained specialists, rather than 
spread out over a large indefinite undifferentiated 
field, merely to gain a superficial knowledge of a few 
subjects. 

Contributed. 



JOURNAL CLUB. 

The regular monthly meeting of the Journal club 
was held on the morning of Jan. 10 at the Entomolog- 
ical laboratory. The reports of the members were, 
for the most part, brief. Mr. Morrill gave some of 
the results obtained from the treatment for the San 
Jose scale on the College grounds and which will 
shortly appear in a bulletin to be issued by the Hatch 
Experiment station. These results show that for 
small trees the hydrocyanic acid gas treatment is 
most satisfactory while for larger trees, spraying with 
the lime, sulphur and salt solution has proved most 
effectual. 

Mr. Hodgkiss mentioned Mr. Hind's thesis In a 
short report concerning the grass thrips. 

Mr. D. N. West called attention to an article In a 
recent issue of the Werner Entomologische Zeitung, 
giving an account of a new species of Heteroptera 
found in South Africa. A report on certain predacious 
and parasitic wasps was given by Mr. Peebles. Mr. 
Ballou then gave an extended and interesting talk 
concerning his recent visit to Washington In search of 
information regarding the Sphecidae. While in 
Washington Mr. Ballou attended a series of concen- 
tration meetings held for the purpose of promoting 
the science of Biology, and had the good fortune to 
meet a number of men who have a wide reputation In 
the field of Entomology. The Impressions which Mr. 
Ballou received of the personalities of these men 
speaks well for that department of Biology. 



7* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



79 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

We publish below the courses of study recently 
adopted by the trustees of this institution and which 
will go Into effect at the beginning of the next college 
year. The figures indicate the number of exercises 
per week ; two laboratory hours are equivalent to one 
exercise hour. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Language. 
Mathematics, 
Science, 
Military, 



Language, 
Mathematics, 

Science, 



Language, 



Science, 



Language, 



Science, 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

( English, 3 

( French, 4 

Algebra, 5 

f Agriculture, 4 

| Botany (4)=2+l= 3 

Tactics, 1 

History, 2 

22 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

( English, 4 

( French, 4 

Geometry and Trigonometry, 4 

I Anatomy and Physiology (j), 5 

-J Chemistry ($), 4 

(Botany (2)= 1 + 1= 2 

History, 2 

25 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 



( English, 
( German, 


4 

4 


Physics, 


4 


I Agriculture, 
} Chemistry (6), 
(Zoology (4). 


4 

3 
2 




21 


SECOND SEMESTER. 




{ English, 
( German, 


4 
3 


Physics, 


4 


Surveying (4), 


2 


( Agriculture, 
3 Chemistry (5). 
( Horticulture, 


3 
3 



Agriculture, 



Horticulture, 



Biology, 



Chemistry, 



21* 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Agriculture. 

Botany (4)=2-f-l = 

Chemistry (6), 

Geology, 

Horticulture, (2)= I +2- 

English, 



Horticulture, 
Horticulture (2)= 1+3= 
Botany (4)=2+l = 
Chemistry (6), 
Geology, 
^English, 



'Zoology (8), 

Botany (4)=2+l: 
J Chemistry (6), 
\ Geology, 

Horticulture, 
^English, 



Chemistry (8), 
Agriculture, 
Mathematics, 
Geology, 
^English, 
Special Subjects, 



Mathematics, - 



Landscape 
Gardening, 



Analytical Geometry, 
Engineering. 3-}-[(2)= 
Free Hand Drawing, 
Landscape Gardening, 
Geology, 
English. 



Landscape Gardening, 
Agriculture, 
Botany (4)=2+l = 
Free Hand Drawing, 
Horticulture, 
Geology, 
^English. 



n 



4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 

20 

4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
4 

21 

4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 

20 

4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
2 



4 
4 
2 
4 
3 
4 

21 

4 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
4 

22 



Agriculture. 



J 



Horticulture, 



Biology, 



Chemistry, 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

'Agriculture, 
Botany (4)=2+l = 
Chemistry (8). 

i Horticulture (4), 
Entomology (8), 

|^ Political Economy, 



Horticulture, 
Botany (4)=2+l = 
Chemistry (8), 
Landscape Gardening, 
Entomology (8), 
Political Economy, 



'Entomology (8), 
Zoology (6), 
Botany (4),=2+U 
Chemistry (8). 
Horticulture (4), 
Political Economy. 



Chemistry (10), 
Agriculture, 
Mathematics, 
Political Economy. 
Special subjects, 



( Engineering, 

I Mathematics, 
Mathematics, -^ Mechanical Drawing (4), 
Landscape Gardening, 
Political Economy, 



Landscape 
Gardening, 



' Landscape Gardening, 
Botany (4)=2+l= 
Mechanical Drawing (4), 
Engineering. 
Entomology (8), 
Political Economy, 



SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

The following subjects are required in all 

Bacteriology (8). 

Constitution of the United States (4) 

Military Science, 



3 
3 
4 
2 
4 
4 

20 
4 
3 
4 
2 
4 
4 

21 

4 
3 
3 
4 
2 
4 

20 
5 
3 
4 
4 
5 

21 
5 
4 
2 
4 
4 

19 
4 
3 
2 
5 
4 
4 

22 



courses : 



4(i) 
4(*) 

1 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

Constitution of the United States, 
Military Science, 



4 

I 



From the following the student must elect three 
courses, closely correlated with his Junior year 
course. Only one course In language can be elected. 



Agriculture 4 


Entomology 


4 


English 


4 


Horticulture 4 


Chemisty 


4 


French 


4 


Veterinary 4 


Physics 


4 


German 


4 


Botany 4 


Engineering 


4 


Latin 


4 


Landscape Gardeni 


ng 4 









Jan. 22. 

Jan. 23. 
Jan. 24. 

Jan. 25. 

Jan. 29. 

Jan. 30. 

Feb. 1. 



CALENDAR. 

Basket ball game with University of Ver- 
mont in Drill Hall at 8 p. m. 
Y. M. C. A. meeting at 7-30. Subject; 
" The Right use of the Tongue." 

Informal dance in Drill Hall at 5 p. m. 
Basket ball game with Brown University at 

Providence. 
Chapel exercises at 9-15 a. m. Y. M. C. 

A. meeting at 3-30 p. m. 
Y. M. C. A. meeting at 7-30. Topic, 

" Our Brother's Keeper." 
Horticultural Seminar at 7-45 p. m. Prof. 

Petit's dancing class in Drill Hall at 9 

o'clock. 
Regular Sunday services in stone chapel. 



NEW YEAR GREETINGS. 

Greet the dawning New Year with a gladsome, hearty cheer ; 

Let your faith and courage rise anew. 
Leave behind the darkening shadows of the dying year ; 

Crasp the brighter promise of the New. 

Teach the world a lesson of the faithfulness of friends ; 

Make your life a pleasure to your own. 
Meet the New Year's problems with a braver heart, and send 

Some sunshine of your life to darkened homes. 

Let the Springtime, with its flowers and buds of promise 
bright, 

With its mingling of the sun and rain. 
Break within your inmost soul a Summer of delight, 

Stirring you to life any hope again. 

Bid the Autumn bring to you from out its golden store. 

A wealth of peace, and quiet, sweet content. 
Then when Winter's stormy blasts shall chill the earth once 
more. 
You may rest upon a year well spent. 

R. R. Ratmoth. 



8o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



81 





!l" 










• 




i , •« 






Collet Not«. 



—Another Co-ed. 0-O-h! 

— Everybody out to support the basket ball team 
to-morrow night ! 

— Herbert T. Kelley, ex- '03. visited the college last 
Sunday. 

— W. J. O'Neil, '06. Markham, '06 and T. F. 
Walsh, '05, have left college. 

— Mr. Sheldon of the Univ. of Iowa has been added 
to the corps of Short Course Instructors. 

C. M. Walker, '97, has been taking special work 

In botany under Dr. Stone the past three weeks. 

— The winter course men have formed a basket ball 

team and will play the freshmen sometime next week. 

— The basket ball management has closed a return 

game with Amherst college to be played in the Drill 

Hall Wednesday. March 4. 

— C. L. Whitaker. who was injured while playing 
basket ball just before the holidays, returned to college 
Monday. His Injury is reported as improving slowly. 
— Some visitors while going through the Entomologi- 
cal Building last week dropped a case containing a 
collection of Bonbyciclae. The collection was a 
valuable one. 

The third Informal dance will take place in the 

Drill Hall next Friday evening, Jan. 23, from 5 to 9. 
Everybody come and get in trim for the Prom. New 
music Is promised. 

— Norman H. Ingham. *05, who had his leg broken 
In the Sophomore-Freshman foot ball game has 
returned to college. He hopes to be able to discard 
his crutches in a few days. 

President H. H. Goodell, who has been unwell 

during the past three months has been compelled to 
take a short vacation. Prof. W. P. Brooks will act as 
president during his absence. 

The new arrangement of having the students 

stand while singing at the opening exercises in the 
morning seems to be a success. A marked improve- 
ment is notlcable in the tone and volume. 

— Copies of the new college song are now ready for 
distribution. Extra copies may be obtained by the 
students and others who may wish for them for twenty- 
five cents. Apply to N. F. Monahan, secretary of 
the Fraternity Conference. The words for this song 



were written by H. L. Knight. '02, the music by Ben 
Chadwick of Westfeld and the handsome cover design 
was gotten up by C. A. Tinker, ex-'04. Orders will 
be filled by mail providing a two cent postage stamp 
is enclosed when ordering. 

— The Junior Prom, will take place in the Drill Hall 
Friday evening, Feb. 20. and from the elaborate plans 
promises to be the best of its kind. The Orchestral 
Club of Springfield will furnish the music. The com- 
mittee in charge Is: G. E. O'Hearn, chairman, M. F. 
Ahearn. C. W. Lewis, A. W. Gilbert, A. L. Peck. C. 
H. Griffin. F. D. Couden. R. R. Raymoth and Profs. 
P. B. Hasbrouck, F. A. Waugh and Dr. J. B. Paige. 
C. W. Lewis has charge of the Hacks and all arrange- 
ments should be made through him. 

— The following men have joined fraternities : D. 
G. K., C. P. Abbott, R. A. Bacon. C. W. Carpenter. 
S. C. Foster, E. W. Hersem. E. P. Mudge. S. A. 
Rogers. E. H. Scott, H. A. Sulhke. A. H. M. Wood. 
P.Webb. J.Mahoney, Goodale. E.W.Newhall '05 ;The 
C. S. C, G. H. Chapman, R. P. Brydon. A. A. 
Racicot, H. M. Russell, G. W. Sleeper. Kennedy. W. 
O. Taft, W. C. Tannett. J. E. Martin. E. F. Gaskell. 
F. O. Stevens and H. P. Wood ; Q. T. V . R. W. 
Peakes. F. Y. Spurr. B. Strain, A. Hastings, C. E. 
Hood, S. F. Morse. V. O. White. Carey. Wellington. 
C. A. Terrill, Wholley. F. A. Ferren. H. O. Russell. 
E. R. Cowles and Osmun' 03 ; * E K ; Cutter, W. 
W. Colton. L. F. Jones and G. F. French. 



/Athletic No*%$. 



BASKET BALL. 
Massachusetts. 35 ; Northampton Y. M. C. A.. 22. 
Massachusetts opened the basket-ball season by de- 
feating Northampton Y. M. C. A. in the Drill hall, 
Monday evening. January 12. Massachusetts began 
the game by throwing five baskets in rapid succes- 
sion ; but were too easily satisfied with their success, 
and it was only by waking up a little toward the end 
of the first twenty minutes that they prevented the 
first half resulting In a tie. The second half was 
faster and much more interesting. Quigley and 
Ahearn played the best game for the home team, 
while Carner and Updyke thew the most baskets for 
the visitors. The line-up : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Anearn, r. f. 
Quigley, 1. f. 
Cook, c. 
Harvey, r. g. 
Fulton, 1. g. 



N. y. m. c. A. 

I. g.. Updyke 

r. g., Brown 

c, Regan 

1. f., Carner 

r. f.. Squire 



Goals from field, Ahearn 6, Quigley 6. Updyke 4. Carner 
4, Regan 2. Harvey 2, Fulton 2, Cook, Squire. Goals from 
foul, Ahearn, Referee. Conden. Umpire. Regan. Timer, 
Ohearn. Score. M., 35. N. Y. M. C. A.. 24. 

Score last year, Mass., 26 ; N. Y. M. C. A., 1 3. 

Amherst, 52 : Massachusetts. 3. 

Massachusetts suffered a severe defeat in Pratt 
Gymnasium last Wednesday at the hands of the 
Amherst team. Amherst put up an excellent exhibi- 
tion of scientific basket ball. In passing, goal throw- 
ing and blocking, man for man they excelled their 
opponents ; and In fact, they scored almost at will. 
Until nearly the end of the game, the visitors could 
not score, the score at the end of the first half being 
30-0. 

The line up : 

AMHERST. MASSACHUSETTS. 

Roe. r. f. 1. g., Fulton 

Crawford (capt.) I. f. r. g., Harvey 

Favour, c. c, Cook 

Brewster, r. g. 1. f., Quigley 

Mrloney, 1. g. r. f,, Ahearn (Capt.) Snell 

Baskets from floor, Maloney 9, Brewster 5. Favor 4, Craw- 
ford 3. Quigley. Baskets on free tries. Crawford 2, Snell 1. 
Missed Crawford 1, Quigley 2. Sn*.ll I. Referee. Field. 
Umpires. Sturgls, Couden. Timers, Daniels and Taylor. 
Score. Amherst 52, Massachusetts 3. 

Score last year (first game) Amherst, 18; Mass., 12. 

Massachusetts, 33 ; Ludlow Athletics, 26. 

Massachusetts defeated Ludlow by the above score 
in the Drill Hall, Saturday, January 17. The home 
team showed much Improvement since the Amherst 
game, but it must be taken into consideration that 
they were playing a much weaker team. The game 
was a fairly clean one and comparatively free from 
fouls. The audience was principally conspicuous by Its 
absence. 

The line up : 



MASSACHUSETTS, 

Taylor, 1. f. 
Fulton, r. f. 
Cook. c. 
Ahearn, 1. g. 
Snell, Hunk, r. g. 



LUDLOW. 

r. g., Irving 

I. g., Rae 

c, Elder 

r. f., Hewland 

I. Em Stuard 



Goals from field, Fulton 5, Hewland 5, Stuart 4. Taylor 4. 
Ahearn 4. Rae 2. Irving. Snell, Hunt. Goals from fouls, 
Ahearn 3, Hewland 2. Referee, Couden. Umpire, Flynn, 
Timer, Jones. Score. Mass.. 33, Ludlow, 26. 
Scoie last year Mass., 42 ; Ludlow. 15. 



J. W. CLARK SPEAKS BEFORE THE HORTI- 
CULTURAL SEMINAR. 

At the Horticultural Seminar held in the Seminar 
room room Friday evening Jan. 16 Mr.John W.Clark, 
former instructor of Horticulture at this College spoke 
on the peach and apple Industry of New England. 

Mr. Clark is a pioneer peach grower of this part of 
the country, having In 1877, raised the first crop of 
commercial peaches in New England, and is besides 
an authority on apple culture. He spoke of the dan- 
ger arising from planting orchards in close proximity 
to woods, stating that in orchards thus situated, fungus 
diseases and injurious insects are apt to be more 
prevalent. Mr. Clark laid stress upon the necessity 
of having proper air circulation, food and cultivation 
and cautioned against the excessive use of nitrogen- 
ous fertilizers. He concluded by giving some valua- 
ble suggestions regarding the methods of preparing 
and applying fungicides and insecticides. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS. 
It is never too late to make a New 
Year' resolution. Make one now, 
resolving to pay your " Signal " sub- 
scription at once AND PAY IT. 

Business Manager. 



Alu 



mm. 



NOTICE. 
The annual reception and banquet of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College club of Massachusetts will be 
held at the Quincy House, Boston, at 6 p. m. Friday, 
Jan. 30. Lieut. Goi>ernor Guild, representatives from 
the Senate and the House, the chairman of committees 
on Agriculture, Pres't Goodell, Prof. Waugh, the sec- 
retary past and elect of the Hoard of Agriculture, the 
secretary of the Board of Education and a representa- 
tive from the " College Signal" Board are expected to 
be present. 

F. W. Davis, 

Clerk, M. A. C.A.C. M 




8a 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



78. — In a recent number of Science we note the 
report of Dr. C. S. Howe, professor of Mathematics 
and Astronomy at the Case school of applied science, 
as secretary of section A, Mathematics and Astron- 
omy of the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. Among the papers read at the 
meeting was one by Dr. Howe entitled, " Determina- 
tion of Time by Reversing on Each Star." At the 
meeting of the general committee of the A. A. A. S. 
Dr. Howe was honored by being elected secretary of 
the council for the St. Louis meeting to be held dur- 
ing convocation week, 1903-4. 

'81, — Henry E. Chapin, teacher, 58 Johnson Ave., 
Richmond Hill, New York city, N. Y. 

NINETY-THREE. 

Joseph Baker, farmer, Riverside farm. New Bos- 
ton, Conn. 

Fred G. Bartlett, sexton of cemetery, 298 Cabot 
St., Holyoke, Mass. 

Henry D. Cla.k, veterinarian. 15 Central St., Fitch- 
burg. Mass. 



Spring Clothes. 



Just the sorts that youug men will appreciate. 
There's a collection here that absolutely cannot 
be found elsewhere in Western New England. 
Will you come and see it? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 



liaynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 



Springfield, 



Mass. 




PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 

New York 

Central 

Lines 



DAILY SERVICE. 



THROUGH COACHES 



BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



SLEEPING CARS 



DINING CARS 



EXPRESS 


TRAIN 


SERVICE 




TO AND FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER 








AB FOLLOWS : 






READ DOWW. 




Kl » 1 


HP. 


9.06 A. M 


. 6.02 P.M. 


It. Amherst 


nr. 9.06 a.m. 


8.36 P.M. 


9.M) " 


fl.46 " 


»r Palmer 


1 v. 8.20 " 


7. SI " 


10.00 " 


fi.Mt " 


It. Palmer 


ar. 7 86 " 


7.36 " 


10.60 " 


8.01 " 


ar. Worcester 


Iv.fi.M " 


8.10 " 


11.80 " 


9.08 " 


ar. Boston 


lv. 5.00 " 


ft.00 " 



To ALBANY, 
To BUFFALO, 
To CHICAGO, 
To CINCINNATI, 
To DETROIT, 
To ST. LOUIS, 



Through the 
Famous . . . 



9 Tra 

8 Tra 

7 Tra 

3 Tra 

5 Tra 

3 Tra 



ns 
ns 
ns 
ns 
ns 
ns 



Berkshire 
hills . . . 

AMU TUB 

Hlbanp 6auu>ap, 

Which Is always Open. 



For further information, time tables, etc., call on ticket agents or address, A. S. HANSON, O.P. A., Boston, Mass. 



George F. Curley, physician and surgeon, 10 Con- 
gress St., Milford, Mass. 

Herbert C. Davis, railway postal clerk, 10 High- 
land Ave.. Atlanta, Ga. 

Chas. A. Goodrich, physician and surgeon. 5 Haynes 
St., Hartford, Conn. 

Francis T. Harlow, farmer, box 106, Marshfield, 
Mass. 

Harry J. Harlow, Shrewsbury, Mass. 

Ernest A. Hawks, evangelist, 4th and Broad Sts., 
Richmond, Va. 

Frank H. Henderson, civil engineer, 43 Ashland 
St., Maiden, Mass. 

Edwin C. Howard, principal of centre grammar 
school. 55 Kensington Ave., Northampton, Mass. 

Franklin S: Hoyt, assistant superintendent of 
schools. 1917 North Pennsylvania, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Eugene H. Lenhert, professor veterinary science 
and physiology, Conn, agricultural college, Storrs, 
Conn. 

A.Edward Melendy, clerk, 1 17 W. Boylston St., 
Worcester. Mass. 

John R. Perry, Interior decorator, 8 Bosworth St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Cotton A. Smith. The Knox, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fred A. Smith, superintendent of parks, box 135, 
Hopedale, Mass. 

Luther W. Smith. Mgr. Highland stock farm, sec- 
retary Southwestern Rice Co., Manteno, III. 

Henry F. Staples, physician and surgeon, The AI- 
hambra, 530 Wade Park Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Luiz A. F. Tinoco, sugar planter and manufacturer, 
Campos, Brazil. 

Edward J. Walker, farmer, box 315. Clinton, Mass. 

'95. — H. A. Ballou, who has been spending several 
weeks in study In Philadelphia, has returned to Am- 
herst. While In Philadelphia, he met several men 
prominent in Entomology. 

'95. Wright A. Root, box 114. Easthampton 
Mass. 

'96. — F. H. Read and Miss Gertrude Gennett 
Cummlngs, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Cum- 
mings of South Acworth, N. H., were married at the 
home of the bride's parents. Sunday. Dec. 21. 1902. 

'99. — Charles M. Walker spent a few days in town 
recently. 

'00.— F. G. Stanley visited the College lately. 



She HEIR 

to the FARM 



1 



?.*.•■ 



!/ 



7 



Will in 1 1..- tln> nlil farm pay 
If In- tin ins i In' farm in the 
nil "In n way. 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

Gaughl by Mail. 

A thorough and practical course. 
under the direct charge ol Win. v. 
Brooks, I'll. I'.. (MasHurlmselts Ag- 
lii'iilluiiil t" ollege), (mi COtUM is 

bai ad "ii 'Brooks' Agrii ulturs i" it 
treats of soils, plants, tillage, drain- 
HKi.il i Igstion.msnuree.fertilisation, 
crop rotation and everything i>n- 
t, lining to money-making on the 
Win. Text books (3 volumes, mhi 
pages, 300 illustrstions) free to st i 
di i is. Sniii fm .1*1 pagg book de- 
scribing course in full. 

Home 

Correspondence 
Schools, 

Spring field. Majj. 



i niirr C'niiriM": lindiipw. Shorthand. 
r<-iiiiinnniii|.. Typswrluna'. hoinuu 
o»ur«e 



mmhln. T.vi'i ■« i nun:. Null 
I nia fur tf in In i '« f, -rtiflc at*. 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGER, 

200 Broadway, New York. 

Club and College Ping and Rings. 
Gold and Silver Medals. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry. 



"UP TO THE 



ii 



IN 



MENS FINE SHOES. 



The Northampton Shoe Go, 



88 Main St., 



Northampton, Maaa. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




•00.— Married at Springfield. Mass. Oct. 8th. '02. 
by Rev John Cotton Brooks. F. Howard Brown of 
Marlboro. Mass. to Mrs. R. H. Speare of Newton 

Centre. Mass. 

•00.— James W. Kellogg, with his wife, spent his 
Christmas vacation of about two weeks in Amherst at 
the home of his father-in-law. Mr. Abel Gilbert. 

•Oi.—T. Frederic Cooke and Miss Mabel L. Rob- 
erts of West Stockbridge. Mass.. were married at the 
home of the bride. Jan. 1. 1903. 

•01.— N. J. Hunting was in town lately. 
•01. _R. 1. Smith is spending a month's vacation 
visiting friends in college and in this vicinity. 

'02.— L. A. Cook and Miss Bertha Starkweather, 
of Amherst, are to be married shortly. It is with 
pleasure that we make this annonncement. 

•02.— F. R. Church has charge of the instruction 
tn the Babcock tests in the short course this winter. 



Write a Note 

to Johnson 




when you Wt«t a book, a picture, some stationery 
or anything else worth having. 



Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AMD ART DEALER, 



313-315 Main St., 



Springfield, Mass. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 



HENRY ADAMS. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Earlv last spring Mr. F. W. Aldrich and other gen- 
tlemen owning a block of property in the residence 
portion of Bloomington. 111., arranged for a contest 
amone the students in landscape gardening at the 
University of Illinois. Each contestant was requ.red 
to submit plans for the improvement of the property 
in question, including full details regard.ng the loca- 
tion and character of drives, walks, trees etc. The 
students were allowed to make a trip to Blooming on 
at the expense of the owners of the property for the 
purpose of examining the lots and collecting data for 
the work The completed plans and speci ications 
were recently passed upon by a committee of judges, 
who awarded prizes to the amount of $60. 




Pure Drugs and Medicines, 



FANCY ANO TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC 

MEERSCHAUM AND RRIAR PIPES. FISHING TACKLE 
AND 8PORTING GOODS. 

M.talllc Cartridge, for Pistols, Sporting and Sprlngflelu rifle.- 
Sunday and night call, responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



Trade Marks 

Designs 

rrnf l COPYRIGHT3 AC. 

qSeiat nnClcs. without chsrve. tn the 



HOTEL- HENKING. 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

First Class Lunch. Rooms •LOO™;! «|W£*««i " lth » ftt1 '' 
tlMtof*a.OO. Doul.le, »2.so; with B.Uli.M DO. 

H. O. HBNKINO AS <~0. 

IS Lyman St., oppo,lt. Vnion »*pot. Sprinufleld. M«»- 

Telephone, MM, 



■^ETfiotfcs. without chaw, in the 

Scientific American. 



___,. ■ ■ Near Union Station, 

OOOLBT'S HOTBIi,spri«uki B li». m»^ 

HKNKY K. MARSH, Proprietor. 

All the modern conveniences. First class accom- 
modations for 300 guests. 

RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 4, 1903 



NO. 8 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

_%_zt_^-j??2SZ.izz2^ 

notify the Business Manager. - — — 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903, Editor-In Chief. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN, 1903. Business Manager. 

HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. 1904, Ass sa.it Business Manaper, 

" UWM ., hfnry JAMES FRANKLIN, 1903, Alumni Notes. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1 903. College Notes. FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904, Athletics. 
RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON, 1903. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904. Interco'legiate. 
R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904. Department Notes. HERB *RT HAROI D .JUGH 1905. 
GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN, 1905. ' " ' 

Term*: $1.00 per u„ur in adcance. Sin,.,. Copies. ,«c. IW.«. outbid. •* United States and Canada, 25c. extr.. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate, 
Readir.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottlngham, ires. Ath>' ■ 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. base Ball Association. 

E B Snell, Pree. Nineteen Hundred ami Tou: 

R. H. Robertson, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 

Entered as second-class mstter. Pott Offic* at Amherst. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
J. G. Cook. Minager. 
A. L. Peck, Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 




For the benefit of our exchanges we would like to 
state that there is no publication issued by this Col- 
lege bearing the name •' Aggie Life." We are the 
continued recipients of mail matter bearing the above 
address and in many instances we receive two copies 
of the same periodical, owing to the mistaken idea 
that there are two publications issued at this institu- 
tion. 



The recent action of the State Board of Health 
to prevent the pollution of sewage of the brook 
which flows through the College grounds meets with 
the hearty approval of all who are connected with the 
College. The condition of the water in the *pond " 
during certain seasons has been such as to not only 
cause it to be extremely repulsive but to be a source 
ot danger and we cannot understand why the matter 
has not been taken in hand long before. With the 
condition of the water improved the College pond can 



be made, as it was intended, one of the most attrac- 
tive features of our grounds, and although its location 
has been criticised by landscape gardeners It can, no 
doubt, with proper treatment, be made to greatly en- 
hance the beauty of the College estate. It is expected 
that in case the College Is successful during the pres 
ent session of the Legislature, in securing funds for 
the improvement of grounds, that the pond and con- 
tiguous plots of land will be given careful attention. 

The appointment of Mr. H. A. Ballou. '95, to the 
position of Government Entomologist to the British 
West Indies, once more presents the Interesting fact 
that, although a comparatively large number of stu- 
dents begin upon graduate work in the various de- 
partments connected with the College, but one man 
as yet. has remained long enough to carry away tne 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. That the remaining 
men become dissatisfied with their courses has not 
been the reason for their leaving, neither have they in 
many instances entered other institutions in order to 
pursue graduate work, but in nearly every case these 



86 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



I 




men have given up further study here in order to ac- 
cept positions which have held out sufficient honor 
and remuneration to tempt them from further 
striving to affix a Ph.D. to their names. It is a mat- 
ter of no small credit to the College that the men 
whom it has sent out have so acquitted themselves 
that the institution is constantly looked to for more of 
the same stamp to fill positions of trust and responsi- 
bility. Tiic fact that the amount of graduate material 
is wholly inadequate to meet the demand is one which 
is bound to cause the institution to grow just so fast 
as the Commonwealth will furnish the facilities which 
will enable it to do so. 



The Prom. Committee of the last few years seem 
to have been impressed with the delusion that it is 
only necessary for a week or ten days to intervene be- 
tween the appearance of the invitations and the Prom, 
itself. We think that it yet remains to be proved 
that formal invitations are for looks only and not for 
use. Certain it is that many wait till the appearance 
of the invitations before inviting a young lady to the 
Prom., not caring to forego formality on such an oc- 
casion. To these it is very inconvenient, to say the 
least, as well as unfair to those to whom the invita- 
tions are sent. Others write personal letters which 
are to be followed later by the formal invitation ; but 
what does the young lady think when she receives a 
note in the hand-writing of her friend requesting the 
honor of her company at the Prom.? Of course she 
accepts, If possible, but there must necessarily lurk 
in her mind an impression that there is an inexcusa- 
ble lack of formality In such a proceeding, seeing that 
a Junior Prom, is such an important event. Hence 
we would humbly suggest that Junior classes in the 
future be specific in giving their committee instruc- 
tions either to dispense entirely with the formal invi- 
tations or else to have them on hand at the very 
least three weeks before the affair. 



EVILS OF MARKING SYSTEM. 

Two cribs In his pocket and one in his cuff. 

Some formulae, rules and other small stuff 

Tucked up his sleeve, and one stolen test. 

A text book, buttoned up under his vest ; 

A bookish chum near to assist him, 

Behold the results of the marking system. — Ex. 



*7 



AN EPISODE. 

[Continued from Dec. 17, 1902.] 

The days passed all too quickly to Cyril ; he would 
have been content to remain there a month. He al- 
most dreaded the return to work and to life so foreign 
to his nature. Here it seemed that all nature was In 
harmony with the daily life of man. There were no 
harsh discords to rack the nerves; no petty disturb- 
ances to change the " even tenor of the way." Here 
in the quiet village they were 

" Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife." 
the noise and discontent of life so characteristic of the 
cities, affected them but little. Here the life was 
too full and free, the expanse too great, to allow any 
trifling matter to disturb the peace and happiness of 
living. When any trouble did arise, obeying the law 
of effusion, it spread throughout the atmosphere, but 
finding no towering walls to re-echo its muttering with 
a gloomier tone, it filled all space and died away in a 
whisper before its Influence was felt or known. 

Pondering on these things Cyril wondered why the 
city life with its restrictions, was so attractive to the 
masses, when there was so much more room in the 
country with its freedom, and its fresh, invigorating 

life. 

***** 

" 1 cannot tell you how much this week has meant 
to me," said Cyril, " I have been looking at life with 
a clearer view before me. Frank has won more than 
my gratitude in bringing me to Saxonville. I antici- 
pated no such pleasure as I have received. I told 

him the night before we left H . that he would be 

sorry for Inviting me. I was afraid I would be a bore, 
and I thought you all would bore me, in your attempts 
to please me, because I was a wealthy friend of your 
brother's. Yes, I honestly thought so," as she turned 
to him with a wondering look, " I have been accus- 
tomed to that kind of people. But my very first 
greeting dispelled all my fears, although I must con- 
fess, It did nearly take my breath away. But I en- 
joyed It ; it was so different from anything I had ever 
experienced before, and it told me that I was wel- 
come." 

" You are very good to say that. I did not think 
until afterward what I had done, and then I was afraid 
that perhaps I had offended you. and—" 

" No one could be offended at anything you do, 



Miss Chadwick," interrupted Cyril. 

'• Now, Mr. Wolvert, you are getting sentimental, 
and I don't like sentimental people." But a tiny 
wave of color fled across her face. 

"Then I won't be sentimental, because I want you 
to like me," said Cyril. 

" Oh, do see." exclaimed Florence, " there is Miss 
Harkness ; I want you to meet her ; she has just 
come home. She spent the last year abroad. I 
want you to take a good look at her too, and tell me 
if you don't think she is pretty. She is considered 
the prettiest girl in Saxonville." 

" Well, please don't stand beside her if you want 
me to judge in her favor," responded Cyril. 

- Now. if you're going to be bad again. 1 shall get 
real cross." said Florence, " but do hurry Datty and 
Fan a little, perhaps we can catch them before they 
turn up the lane." 

The horses responded but too well to the touch of 
the whip for Florence, who had half risftr) in her 
eagerness, was thrown somewhat violently back as the 
sleigh bounded forward ; and but for Cyril's protecting 
arms, she might have received quite a shaking, as it 
was it made her very warm and quite rosy in the face, 
and Cyril felt the blood tingle through his body with 
an unwonted thrill that made his heart beat with a 
rapidity that startled him. (Violent exercise at all 
times is dangerous.) 

They looked at each other and — laughed. 

They had come within speaking distance, now, of 
the other sleigh and Florence called out as they, 
neared the sleigh. 

"Clara, do hold Cedric in a little, will you? I 
want to speak to you." 

The response was a turn of the head and an ex- 
clamation of surprise. 

" Why Florence, I'm so glad to see you. It is so 
good to see old friends again." Then she paused as 
she failed to recognize Cyril. 

" Let me make you acquainted with Mr. Wolvert, 
Frank's room-mate at college. Clara." Cyril bowed, 
but his glance shot past her to her partner, who had 
risen at the mention of his name, and turned round. 
" Let me introduce my bro — " began Miss Harkness, 
but she was interrupted by — 

" Why Don ! " 

" Hello Baron ! Well this is—." 



The exclamations were Instaneous, and they nearly 
tumbled out of the sleigh in their eagerness to get to 
one another. 

The girls looked at each other in wonderment and 
then at their partners. 

" Why, do you know each other ? " queried Clara. 
" We don't act very much like strangers, do we, 
sis?" replied Don. " Know each other?" and his 
laugh was so hearty, it was Infectious, " well, we've 
seen each other a few times before, haven't we. 
Baron?" and he gave Cyril a shake that betokened 
acquaintance. 

" Yes, I believe we met once or twlce-a-day, for 
four years," responded Cyril with a merry twinkle in 
his eye. 

" Well, you girls hava wondered long enough I guess. 
Don't you remember who the Baron is, sis, have you 
forgotten all about my college days at dear old M — " 
and he looked toward his sister with a searching look. 
•• Why Don, you don't mean that Mr. Wolvert is 
the one who — " 

" Yes. I do." he Interrupted, " the very same, but 
I'll wager neither Miss Chadwi.k nor Frank know 
anything about it." 

" Oh. 1 say Don, please don't revive that foolish 
whim." 

•• Foolish ? Well some people wouldn't call it fool- 
ish, they'd be only too proud — " 

" Don, don't, I request," interrupted Cyril. 
" Well, as you wish old man. But now, Miss Chad- 
wick, perhaps you would like to know, how it Is we 
are so intimately acquainted. You will probably have 
heard that the Baron, is a sort of a cynic, as some 
people call it. The Baron ? Oh, I see, he isn't 
called that in H apparently. That was a name we, 
who knew him, gave him, but I'll tell of that later. 
Well the fellows in M — called him a sort of a cynic, 
that is those who didn't know him ; but there was 
about half a dozen of us. who got acquainted with 
him. and found out what there was In him, and — " 

" Come, hadn't we better drive on, rather than re- 
maining here. It's too good a day to lose," inter- 
rupted Cyril. " let's take a spin along the river and re- 
turn through Hull's Park." 

" It seems to me, you're pretty well acquainted 
with Saxonville for the short time that you've 
been here," said Don. 



88 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



89 



" Yes, I've made quite a few pleasant trips about 
the town, seeing the beauties of the place." 

•• Um, which beauty did you look at the most?" 
and Don shot a mischievous glance at Florence. 

•• Have you forgotten how your ears used to burn, 
sir, when you were bad, and I was near," and Flor- 
ence laughed merrily as she thought of it. 

•• No, that 1 haven't," exclaimed Don, as he 
clasped'a hand over each ear. '• But I'm getting 
too big for you now. You wouldn't dare do it." 

•• Don't dare me. Better go careful, sir, or 1 
might be tempted." 

-Suppose we take that drive, and then all spend 
the rest of the afternoon at our house. I know Frank 
will be glad to see you, and we can give the boys a 
good-bye party. They leave for H— to-morrow." 
said Florence, and with a merry jingle of the bells 
they started. 

(To be concluded.) 



orandial speeches. Dr. Walker expressed regret at 
the absence of Professors Waugh and Brooks, who 
were detained from being present on account of sick- 
ness, and of Pres. Goodell whom, he said, had just 
reached the Bahama Islands. He spoke of the de- 
velopment of the college during the past decade lay- 
ing stress upon the high quality of work which the 
students are maintaining and stating that real things 
and not ideal things are taught at the college. 

Hon. James A. Myers. Speaker of the House of 
of Representatives, then made an eloquent address 
congratulating the institution upon what it has 
accomplished in the cause of science. He, in clos- 
ing said that the ribbons on the menus recalled to 
his mind the crimson of Harvard, of which university 
he is a graduate, and thereby caused him to have 
even a deeper bond of sympathy with the State Col- 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REUNION OF THE 
MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE CLUB OF MASSCHUSETTS. 

HELD AT QUINCY HOUSE, BOSTON. A LARGE NUMBER 
PRESENT. L1ENT. GOV. GUILD AND PRES, GOODELL 
UNABLE TO ATTEND. PROFESSORS WALKER. STONE 
AND PAIGE REPRESENT THE FACULTY. 

One of the largest gatherings in the history of the 
Club was present at the annual reception and banquet 
of the Massachusetts Alumni association held in the 
Quincy House. Boston. Friday, Jan. 30. Long before 
the appointed time small knots of men gathering in 
the corridors gave evidence by their hearty salutations 
that an alumni reunion wa, at hand. Many regrets 
were expressed over the necessary absence of Presi- 
dent Goodell and Lieut.-Governor Guild. After an 
informal reception the following officers were elected 
for the ensuing year: Dr. Madison Bunker, 75. pres- 
ident ; F. W. Davis. '89. clerk ; R. P. Lyman, treas- 
urer;' C. P. Preston, '83. W. A.Morse. 82. and 
W H. Barstow, 75, directors. 

After the election of officers the party adjourned 
to the dining rooms where an elaborate dinner was 
served. Music was rendered during the evening by 
the Mendelssohn quartet of Boston. 

Ex-Representative C. H. Preston. '83. acting as 
toastmaster, called upon Dr. Walker to open the post- 



age. ... 

Dr Madison Bunker entertained his listeners with a 

number of anecdotes regarding his student life and 
expressed deep regret that the trolley line to North 
Amherst was not in operation at that time. He re- 
minded Speaker Myers that the ribbon on the menus 
was not crimson but maroon, that it was the maroon 
that once waved from the stern of a certain shell at 
Ingieside, and that the white ribbon represented the 
water which stretched between that maroon pennant and 
the prow of Harvard's eight oar. This bit of raillery 
at the expense of Speaker Myers was highly appre- 
ciated. 

General Francis H. Appleton, chairman of the 
Senate Committee on Agriculture, spoke briefly of his 
pleasant associations with the college and its faculty, 
and was followed by Hon. Chas. L. Flint, who spoke 
with fervor upon the value of thorough consistent ex- 
perimentation, saying that in this line our college 

excels. 

Dr. Paige was ready with a fund of arguments in 

favor* of installing poultry and bee culture in the 
special courses and stated that funds were already 
forthcoming for this purpose. 

Secretary of the Board of Agriculture. J. Louis 
Ellsworth, asked for the hearty support of the Alumni 
in helping to pass certain bills, pertaining to the col- 
lege, through the present session of the Legislature. 
Dr H J. Wheeler, director of the R. I. Experi- 
ment Station said. " The Massachusetts Agricultural 



College never has had, nor must never have an in- 
ferior course of study. Our degree means something 
and must mean something." Following Mr. 
Wheeler's speech Hon. Frank Garett. House Chair- 
man of the Committee of Agriculture, stated that the 
necessity for more equipment will be the greatest 
argument to bring before the Legislature, and that if 
we are to ask for more buildings and apparatus we 
must have more men. He said that the Legislature 
had always been a friend to the college and that the 
college would never want for necessary equipment. 

M. H. West was then called upon to speak in be- 
half of the College Signal. He gave a brief outline 
of the history of journalism since its introduction into 
the college in 1870 and touched upon the scope of a 
college paper and upon the attitude and policy of the 

Signal. 

W. H. Bowker. 71, w.ho was a member of the 
first Board of Editors to' be elected by the college, 
then recounted some of his experiences as an editor 
when journalism was in the embryo state in this insti- 
tution. Although Mr. Bowker. like many of the older 
alumni, still clung with affection to the term " Aggie ;" 
he believes that great things are in store for the col- 
lege. •• Sixteen years hence," he said, " our college 
will boast of four hundred students." 

The last speaker of the evening was greeted with 
rounds of applause. A pressing invitation had been 
tendered him to be present and every alumnus around 
the festive board was taken back to his college days 
again as our old friend Dan Hart stood up and faced 
the assemblage. A stenographer had been sum- 
moned, all unawares to our friend, and we reproduce 
his speech as nearly as possible, but the matter-of- 
fact the Boston girl was quite unable, at times, to 
connect with Dan's poetic outflow. 



•Meester Preesident ond meembersof thoi Agricul- 
tural Colloige Alomni Association— Oi received with 
some sorprise a commonication froim one froind ex- 
pecting me to coome to Bostin to deliver a speach at 
the Alomni Deener ; oind Oi wish to extind moi sin- 

scere thoinks. 

At the toime of the Revoolutionary War Oi en- 
leested in the ormy and Oi found out there thot the 
hoirdest part ov the worke was to go aheed and doo 
phat you wore toild. 



Oi exteend moi sincere thoinks fur inviting me. as 
ond oindee-gradooate of thois college ; fur arlthoo Oi 
intered the class of seeventy-two Oi hove not gradoo- 
ated yit. Oi coin't tell why. oonless the facoolty av 
got a grooge agin me, or mai sins are so great thot 
Prixy won't allow me moi degree. Applause. 01 hoive 
been to the aloomni poities. Oi hoive been one of the 
oinder gradooates since Myster Bowker was in his col- 
oige days. Oi was oonly a bye when Oi intered and 
now Oi am an oild mon of seexty thrae years. But Oi 
tell you phat. geentlemen, whin Oi intered the college 
there was oonly thrae leetle buildings thoir, ond now 
looke on the splindid labooratories; looke at those fine 
dorrmatories; looke at the bootlful drrlll harl ond the 
ilegint tar woiks thot were not thoir whin Prisidint 
Flint soit in thoir chair. Thin lolst but not leest, woi 
most not forgit the chorming co-eds. Applause. 

Phat a booteful soite of a summors day. or morn- 
ing, or evening— to lolke down on the bootiful colloige 
grounds, oover the trenspirent lake to the grave hills 
beyond. The balmy air ond the moignificent scanery 
surpasses onything on record. 

Looke at phat our byes hoive done am the athlitic 
field whin they hoive run up aginst Ormherst und 
Williams und the rist of 'em. How they dim the 
field of 11 Cony, facing the moorderous bullets, ond 
drrove the Spaniards in their intreenchments. 

Now geentlemen thoir olr two tnings thot 01 would 
remoind you of thot moite hilp you. Our loibrary is 
full to overflowing with rading stuff, ond onless yoo 
poiple down hare to Boston git us a noo boilding. 
Prixy will after be polling hois books arle oover the 
campoos. And thin agin Myster Docter Wellington 
wants a chemical labooratory the worrst way ond oop 
on tho hoill Myster Professor Waugh wants a broin 
nue hall for to toich his horrticoolture-garrdening in. 
This ond moiny more faine things should thees grolt 
state of Bostin git foir us oind with you. geentlemen. 
reests the great responsoibllity. Geentlemen, mony 
thoinks fur your kindness in eentertoining your vener- 
able colleague oil your alomni parrty toonight, ond 01 
till you phat the pleesent memory of this avening ois 
will ois minny loike ones in the polst will dwell with 
the oild bye dooring the yearrs to coome." 



It is practically certain that Yale will not compete 
in the intercollegiate strength tests this year. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



9* 



JUNIOR ELECTIVES. 

Now that Junior Electives are assured for next 
year it is necessary for the members of each class as 
they come to the junior year to decide on some 
special study in which they wish to perfect them- 
selves. Almost every student when he enters college 
has some idea, generally more or less vague, of what 
he wishes to take up as a life work; but there are 
many men in college now, and there always will be 
some, who do not know in just which branch of study 
they want to center their efforts. With some this i? 
due to a lack of earnestness in college work, while 
with others it is simply indecision. This matter of 
choosing a course is one of the most important steps 
a college man has to take as it influences all his after 
life. If. for instance, a man elects the agricultural 
course but finds at the end of a semester that he can 
do better work in mathematics, he has made a great 
mistake and the results are proportionally the more 
fatal the longer the wrong course is pursued. Every 
man when he makes up his course should be as sure 
that he has chosen that one best suited to his tastes 
and in which he can do the most good to mankind as 
he is that he lives and breathes. The man who 
makes an indifferent choice is sure sooner or later to 
regret it and wish, perhaps too late, to remedy the 
mistake. Then there is still another thing necessary 
after the choice is made. This is: if a man expects 
to get the most out of the time and money spent here 
In college he must do hard, earnest and conscientious 
work. One of the gravest criticisms against the 
modern college student is that he shows a lack of 
earnestness in his work. However, if the right course 
is chosen and the student is interested in his work 
this criticism can hardly be brought against him. 
Then let us choose our courses with careful thought 
and when once chosen let us push our way through, 
unswerving in purpose to the end. 

" Stick to your aim. the mongrel's hold will slip. 
But only crowbars loose the bulldog's grip." 

R. '05. 



The first of these, which took place on Friday. Jan. 
23. was on the proposition, " Students should be 
admitted into this college by examination alone." 
Mr. W. E. Tottingham and M. A. V. Osmun, the two 
speakers appointed to carry on the debate, both chose 
the affirmative side of the question. They put special 
emphasis on the fact that certificates are not aiways 
trustworthy. They also stated that city high schools 
and country high schools differ greatly in their grade 
of scholarship. As no volunteer from the class wished 
to speak on either side, Professor Mills gave a short 
talk, presenting some arguments on the negative side 
of the question. 

On Friday. Jan. 30. the second debate took place. 
This time the proposition was " Would it be advisable 
for Canada to be annexed to the United States." 
The two appointed speakers, Mr. S. C. Bacon and 
Mr. P. W. Brooks, again both chose the affimative 
side which they ably presented. W. E. Tottingham, 
G. D. Jones. W. W. Peebles, P. N. Nercessian, H. 
J. Franklin and G. L. Barrus as volunteers from the 
class all took the negative side of the question. After 
the debate was over, Professor Mills put the vote to 
the class as to which side had won. The vote was 
almost unanimous in favor of the negative. 



I 



SENIOR DEBATES. 

The first two debates of the series of senior debates, 
which are carried on weekly under the instruction of 
Prof. G. F. Mills during the winter and spring months, 
have already been held. 



Obstrd&tions^C onc ' u S ,on S 

The observer has not been able to answer all of 
of his correspondence of late and several who have 
written htm have failed to enclose stamped envelopes 
for reply. He does not like to disappoint anyone 
however, so he publishes a few of the questions asked 
him within the last few weeks and appends his answers. 
He trusts the latter will be of interest to others than 
the ones for whose benefit they are especially intended. 

(From one. too well known to need Introduction.) 
Dear Mr. Observer: 

Can you tell me why I am called " Chain 
Lightning?" I can not believe that the title is 

deserved. 

Yours truly, 

Newton Wallace, Electrician. 

'Tis easy to agree with you indeed, 

Your speed does not compare with Lightning's speed, 

Nicknames are oft applied in sarcast 1 vein, 

If you were fast, to call you so, no need. 



***** 

(The Co-ed defends herself.) 

My Dear, Dear, DEAR Mr. Observer : 
i 



And now my one single idea in thus 

and in writing you is to and to 

and etc., etc. And finally, I want 



above all things to 



why we Co-eds are so 



unpopular at our college. Are there not worse things 
in the world even than two or three Co-eds ? 3 We 

etc., etc. 

Ever your sincere friend. 



If e'er there can appear to public view, 

A girl with piebald face, green eyes, and hair light blue 4 . 

The men will hail the sight with joy, if then, 

They know they're spared the sight, for good, of you. 

Your compliments most touch me. I confess. 
Yet 'tis not that that keeps me answerless\ 
1 e'en should like to write" it here in print ; 
But I'm in deadly fear I'd smash the press. 

(A type.) 
High School, — 



-, Mass. 



The Observer, Amherst, Mass.: 

Dear Sir: — Since last summer 1 have been corre- 
sponding with Mr. of your college. Lately 

his letters have been fewer and fewer every week. 
Now at least five days have gone by since I have 
heard from him at all. He is my first love. Do 
you suppose he will be my last ? Is my heart broken ? 

I enclose photograph of myself. 

Yours etc., 
Anxious. 
My dear, delightful, darling, drivelling miss. 7 
Your photo shows a lovely face. Know this I 
Fair maid's first love is not her last by many, 
All men are lovers when they've pretty lips to kiss. 

1 Poetic license. 

2 Platitudes omitted. 

i Note— I suppose there might be five or six.— Ob. 
A Either a physical impossibility or a freak.— Ob. 

5 Poetic license. 

6 " Write It here In print." A paradox, poetic license again. 

7 •'Drivelling," "foolish, childish, doting" St. 

_ ^ 

Dartmouth vs. Williams' joint debate is to be held 
in Hanover some time in May. Question — " Re- 
solved , that the best industrial interests of the U. S. 
demand the absolute abolition of customs, duties on 
raw materials and rough products of iron and steel, — 
such as pig iron, bar iron, rails and steel ingots." 



CALENDAR. 

Feb. 5.— Spring semester opens. Missionary meet- 
ing of Y. M. C. A. at 6-45 P. m. Vocal 
club at Academy of Music. Nellie Bur- 
gess in the County Fair. Court Square 
theatre. Midnight in Chinatown, Hoi- 
yoke Opera House. 

F EB , 6. — Horticultural seminar at 7-45 p. m., speaker, 
G. Harold Powell, Assistant Pomologlst, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Hool- 
igan's Luck, Holyoke Opera House. 

F EB . 7. — Journal club meeting in Entomological Lab- 
oratory at 10-30 a. m. Below Zero, 
Holyoke Opera House. 

Feb. 8. — Chapel exercises at 6-15 a. m. Meeting 
of College Y. M. C. A. at 3 30 p. m. 

Feb. 9 and week — Daniel R. Ryan at Academy of 
Music. 

Feb. 10. — St. Jean Babtistc, Holyoke Opera House. 

Feb. 1 1 . — Eugenie Blair in Za Za, Court Square 
theatre. In Convict Stripes, Holyoke 
Opera House. 

Feb. 12.— Meeting of the Y. M. C. A. at 7-30 p. m.. 
topic. •• Prayer a Necessity." 

Feb. 13.— H. W. Collingwood. editor of the Rural 
New Yorker speaks before the Horticultu- 
ral Seminar on "Openings for Agricultu- 
ral Graduates." 

Feb. 14. — Basketball game with Southbridge Y. M. 
C. A. in Drill Hall. Hearts of Oak in 
Court Square theatre. Howe's Moving 
Pictures with matinee, Holyoke Opera 
House. 

Feb. 15. — Regular services in Stone Chapel at 9-15. 
College Y. M. C. A. at 3-30. 

Feb. 16. — Hearts of Oak at Academy of Music 

Feb. 18.— Basketball game with Williams at Williams- 
town. Ethel Barrymore at Academy of 
Music. 



The annual regatta of the Intercollegiate Rowing 
Association will be held at Poughkeepsie. N. Y.. on 
June 26. 1903. Crews will be entered by Columbia. 
Cornell. Pennsylvania. Syracuse and Wisconsin. The 
annual regatta for junior crews will be held at Ithaca 
on May 3d at which will be representatives of Har- 
vard, Cornell, Columbia, Penn. and Syracuse. 



ga 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



93 



Collect No*eS- 



— Half the year gone. 

—Prof. F. A. Waugh has been ill the past few days. 
—The basket ball game with Wesleyan has been 

cancelled. 

— Lampson. '03, Kennedy, '06, Taft, '06. and 
Mosely, '06, have been transferred to the band. 

— L. W. Hardy, of Springfield, is arranging the 
song .' Sons of Old Massachusetts " for the College 
band. 

.. Dan" Hart, so well known about College for 

many years, spoke at the alumni banquet in Boston 
last Friday night. 

—The junior class has been allowed the privilege 
of substituting Political Economy for any one study 
in their required curriculum. 

We have heard of class pins, class rings, class 

pipes, class canes etc., but until the present short 
course class entered College, we never heard of class 
cudgels. 

—The Freshmen and short course gave a delight- 
ful vaudeville entertainment in the drill hall last 
Thursday evening. The play was entitled " A game 
of basket ball." 

—Miss Justine Hunt, '04, and Miss Monica San- 
born. '05, have moved to their rooms in the new din- 
ing hall. Mrs. P. E. Naylor of Salem. Mass., has 
been appointed to the position of matron for the din- 
ing hall. 

—The specimens in the Botanical museum have 
been packed away, and the room appropriated for the 
use of the class in landscape gardening. It seemed 
too bad to packtne museum away, but no other room 
was available for the landscape men. 

About eighty men are now boarding at the new 

dining hall. A committee composed of Prof. G. F. 
Mills. Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck. Mr. C. P. Halligan, '03, 
G. E. O' Hearn. '04 and the steward P. E. Naylor 
have charge of all matters connected wfth the house. 
—In the reorganization of the Massachusetts State 
Board of Agriculture M. A. C. has been generously 
remembered as usual. Trustee W. R. Sessions is 
vice-president, Prof. F. A. Waugh is botanist and 



pomologist, Dr C. A. Goessman is chemist, Prof. C. 
H. Fernald is entomologist, Dr. J. B. Paige is veteri- 
narian and Trustee William Wheeler is engineer. 

—The Massachusetts Horticultural society gives 
its usual winter course of lectures in Boston this year, 
three of the eight lectures being by members of the 
M. A. C. faculty. On Jan. 24 Prof. Waugh spoke on 
••Systematic Pomology," on Jan. 31, Dr. Walker 
lectured on •• What the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture is 
doing for the Farmer." on March 14 President Gocd- 
ell tells " What the Monks have done for Agricul- 
ture." Prof. Waugh also addresses the Connecticut 
Pomological society Feb. 4, and the Worcester Hor- 
ticultural society Feb. 5. 



/Vfchletic N°*^S- 



BASKET BALL. 

MASSACHU LETTS. 44 ", VERMONT, 22. 

The home team defeated the University of Ver- 
mont in the Drill hall on the evening of February 22d, 
by a good margin. The game was rather rougher 
than necessary at times, but was interesting from the 
beginning. Massachusetts scored the first basket and 
soon gained a lead which they kept throughout the 
game. Thomas threw the largest number of baskets 
for Vermont, while Quigley and Ahearn played the 
best game for the home team. The Vermont team 
complained a good deal about the poor lighting of the 
drill hall. It seems a shame that the College author- 
ities cannot see that the only place where basket ball 
games, dances, etc., can be held, is properly lighted: 

The score : 
u .._ Univ. of Vermont. 

MASS. 

Fulton, r. f. 
Quigley,!. f. 
Cook, c. 
Hunt, 1. b. 
Ahearn, r. b. 

Score, Massachusetts 44. Veimont 22. Goals from field. 
Quigley 9. Ahearn 8. Thomas 5, Fogg 2, Peck. Bassetl. 
Cook, Hunt. Goals from fouls. Ahearn 6. Fogg 4. Referee, 
Couden. Umpires, Favour, White. Timer. Allen. Time. 
2 twtmty minute halves. 

Brown, 48 ; Massachusetts. 12. 
Massachusetts was defeated in Providence by 
Brown universty. Jan. 24 by a large score. Brown 
played a consistent game while nearly all of Massa- 



1. b.. Fogs 

r. b.. Patterson. Back 

c. Peck 

r. f.. Thomas 

I. f.. Bassett 



chusett's scoring was done when the game was nearly 
over. The absence of screens behind the baskets 
bothered the visitors considerably and many goals 
were missed which otherwise might have been thrown. 
For Brown, Rackle played the best game whiie Quig- 
ly and Ahearn did all the scoring for Massachusetts. 
The score : 

BROWN. " 

Rackle, 1. f. r, b., Ahearn. Snell 

Ingalls, r. f, I, b., Fulton 

Leland, c. c. Cook 

Gallison, r. b. 1. f.. Quigley 

1. b. r. f.. Taylor, Ahearn 

Score, Brown 43. Mas&achuL.c'.t.. 12. Goals from field, 
Rackle 8, Ingalls 5. 6, Quigley 3. Ahearn 3, Leland 

2. Gallison. Referee. Schwinn. Umpire, Snell. Time. 2 
twenty minute halves. 



Dep&r-tmtrvf ^lot^s. 



WINTER COURSE IN DAIRY FARMING. 

The Dairy course has opened its session with a 
total enrollment of twenty-nine, an increase of four- 
teen over last year's class ; this does not include the 
senior students and other regular students of the col- 
lege, who are also taking the Dairy work. 

The work of the School is not primarily for a train- 
ing alcng commercial lines, although a good founda- 
tion is laid, should any desire to follow it up as a busi- 
ness ; but it is principally devoted to the interests of 
the farmer in his home products. It deals with those 
problems which confront the average man upon the 
farm who is striving to make the best and most profit- 
able use of his products. Some of the students are 
also receiving training in Horticulture and Entomol- 
ogy, in which those problems most intimately con- 
nected with the Dairy Farmer are discussed. 

The corps of instructors includes the name of G. A. 
Billings. '95. H. L. Knight, '02, and F. R. Church. 
'02. Following is the course of instruction : 

20 exercises: Soils, Manures and Fertilizers, Crops 
and Rotations, Prof. Wm. P. Brooks. 

20 lectures : Breeds and Breeding of Dairy Stock. 
Prof. F. S. Cooley. Judging to scale of Points. Illus- 
trated by models, views and living animals. 

10 lectures: Fodders and Feeding Dairy Animals. 
H. M. Thomson, B. S. 

10 lectures: Common Diseases of Stock. Pre- 



vention and Treatment. Dr. J. B. Paige. 

10 lectures; Stable Construction and Sanitation. 
Dr. J. B. Paige. 

10 exercises: Bookkeeping for Dairy Farm and 
Butter Factory. Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck. 

10 exercises : Composition of Milk and of Special 
Milk Products. H. L. Knight, B. S. 

20 lectures: Dairy Products their General Charact- 
istics, testing, etc. Prof. F. S. Cooley. 

Instruction in Theory of Pasteurization and Sterili- 
zation. George A. Billings, B. S. 

Instruction in Care of Boilers, Engines and 
Machinery, N. Wallace. 

DAIRY AND CREAMERY PRACTICE. 

4 exercises per week : Milk Testing. Determining 
fats and solids in milk, cream, skim milk, buttermilk, 
etc. F. R. Church. 

4 exercises per week : Work with Separators. 
George A. Billings, B. S. 

4 exercises per week : Butter Making, ripening 
cream, etc. Mr. Sheldon, University of Iowa. 

Practice in Preparation of Modified and Certified 
Milk and Cream. Pasteurization, Aeration, Bottling, 
etc.: as directed. Geo. A. Billings, B. S. 

Students may take work in other subjects also if 
time allows. 

PRIZES OFFERED. 

Through the liberality of the Massachusetts Society 
for Promoting Agriculture, the following prizes are 
offered : 

1. To the students doing the best work ; in their 
studies, and in the practical exercise ; 

1st prize, $50 in cash. 
2d " $30 " 
3d " $20 

2. To students making the highest scoring butter ; 

1st prize, $25 in cash. 
2d " $15 " 
3d " $10 " 

3. To the students doing best in judging dairy 
slock : 

1st prize. $25 in cash. 
2d " $15 " 
3d •' $10 '• 



'01.— R. I. Smith has returned to his work at the 
Maryland State College. 









94 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



95 



Alumni. 



The Second Annual meeting of the Connecticut 
Valley Association of Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege Alumni will be held in the New Rathskeller of 
Heublein Hotel, 98 Wells Street, Hartford. Conn.. 
Friday evening. February 20th, at 7-30 o'clock. All 
alumni and former students are cordially invited. 
Members of the faculty will be present. Fee, $3.00. 
payable on or before Monday, February 16th, to H. D. 
Hemenway, Sec. Box 965, Hartford. Conn. 

NOTICE. 
All alumni planning to attend the Junior Prom, on 
February 20, should communicate with me. or with 
some friend among the undergraduates at once. The 
committee will undertake to make out preliminary 
dance orders for anyone who cannot do so for himself. 

G. E. O'hearn. Chairman. 
75.— Dr. Madison Bunker, the retiring president of 
the Massachusetts alumni association has been a 
prominent factor in making the meetings of the asso- 
ciation in recent years a marked success. 



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75. — P. M. Harwood has recently been elected 
general agent of the Dairy Bureau of the State Board 
of Agriculture. Mr. Harwood has had an interesting 
and varied career. He was born and reared on a 
farm in Barre. Mass. After graduating from college 
he made his home in Barre, where he took up dairy- 
ing and the breeding of Holstein-Friesian cattle. He 
was the first man to ever send a shipment of Holstein- 
Friesian cattle to Japan. About this time, he served 
one term as a member of the State Board of Agricul- 
ture, representing the Worcester County West Agri- 
cultural Society. In 1891. he closed out his interests 
in Barre and went to Ohio to establish a creamery 
plant for a wealthy Cleveland gentleman. From this 
position he was called to the chair of Agriculture a» 
the Michigan Agricultural College. Lansing being also 
agriculturist of the experiment station. On his return 
to the east, he entered the employ of the Massachu- 
setts Board of Cattle Commissioners, being engaged 
in appraising condemned herds to some extent, but 
mainly in the performing of autopsies to determine the 
actual condition of animals slaughtered because of 
tuberculosis. About three years ago, he entered the 
employ of the Dairy Bureau of the State Board of 
Agriculture and has since served as one of its agents. 
On Jan. 14th he was elected general agent of the Dairy 
Bureau. It is generally thought that the bureau has 
made a wise choice. Mr. Harwood will make his 
headquarters at the rooms of the board of agriculture 
at the State House and will have charge of the work 
of the state in enforcing Its laws against the fraudulent 
sale of oleomargarine and renovated butter and milk. 

'90. — John S. Loring of Shrewsbury, Mass., who 
went to Florida last fall for his health, died at Orlando, 
Florida, Jan. 17, 1903. Mr. Loring at the time of his 
death, was thirty-two years old. The body was taken 
to Shrewsbury for burial. 

'91, — E, P. Felt at the meeting of the association 
of Economic Entomologists held in Washington during 
"Concentration Week" gave the presidential address 
as retiring president of the association. Mr. Felt 
spoke on the following topics: " Observations on the 
Grape Vine Root Worm," " Results obtained with 
Certain Insecticides," and "Notes on Injurious 
Insects." 



me HEIR 

to the FARM 



bri 



!/ 



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Will make the old farm pay 
If In: Linus tho farm in the 
modem way. 

Modern 
Agrictil- 
ture 

Vaughl by Mail. 

A thni'nui:ii nnil practical coa r se , 
under the direct charge >f V. i 
Brooks, I'h. I '-. < Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural i ollege). ( mi course i^ 
based on "Brooks' Agriculture;" it 
ti i its ol soils, plant) . tillage, drain* 
■to.irrigstion, manures, fartllisation. 
crop rotation and evnrything pet* 
tnining in money m iking on the 
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Home 

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Otoar Course i Badness, Shoilliaad, 
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< "Hi m- hi* I'.r I»-,i. In i h ( .1 1 1 In *tu> 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGER, 

200 Broadway, New York. 



Club and College Pins anil Rings. 
Cold and Silver Medals. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry. 



"UP TO THE MINUTE" 



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The Northampton Shoe Co., 



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9 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•94._A. H. Kirkland M. S. gave an address on 
"Scale Insects" before the Worcester County Horti- 
cultural Society on Jan. 22nd. 

'95.__H. A. Ballou has accepted his appointment 
as government entomologist for the British West 
Indian Islands. Mr. Ballou will begin his work in this 
capacity about the first of March. He will leave 
Massachusetts about the middle of February. His 
headquarters will be at Barbadoes. His work will 
consist chiefly of collecting and field work in connection 
with economic entomology. He has the best wishes 
of many friends both in Amherst and elsewhere. 
'95.- H. L. Frost visited the college recently. 

•97. p. H. Smith is, during this week, making a 

collection of feed samples in the Berkshires for the 
Hatch Experiment Station. 

Ex-'97. — M. E. Cook. Shrewsbury, Mass. 
•99._The finished thesis of W. E. Hinds was 
recently published in the report of the Smithsonian 
Institution, Proceedings of the United States National 
Museum. It is entitled " Contribution to a Monograph 
of the Insects of the Order Thysanoptera Inhabiting 
North America. It covers 219 pages and has eleven 
plates. It contains the descriptions of four new genera 
and seventeen new species. The plates are said to be 
among the best ever presented for publication at the 
Smithsonian Institution. 



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Trade Marks 
Designs 
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a nroiio »<mi<1Iiir n nketch and description may 
nnlfkly nsccrtaln our opinion free whether an 
Invention la probably patentable, i ommunlra- 
tlonsptrtctlyconfldentlnl. Handbook on t'atonta 
nont free. Oldest apreney for serurinKpatents. 

Patent* taken through Munn A Co. receive 
tptcial notice, without c harg o. In the 

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when you want a book, a picture, some stntimn ry 
or anything else worth having. 



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FANCT AND TOII.RT ARTICLES, IMFOKTKD AND 
DOMK8TIC CIGARS, ( HiAllKTTRS, ETC. 

MKKR8CIIAUM AND URIAH I'll'KS, FISHINC TACKI.K 
AND SPORTING BOOM. 

M etalllc Cartridges for IUstols, Sporting nn.l Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calU responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Rlock. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIII. 



AMHERST. MASS., FEBRUARY 25. 1903 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni ara requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College; Signal, Amhekst. Mass, The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903, Editor-in Chief. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN. 1903. Business Manager. 

HOWARD MORGAN WHITE, I 904. Assistant Business Manager. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1 903. Coliege Notes. HENRY JAMES FRANKLIN, 1903, Alumni Notes. 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON, 1903. FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904, Athletics 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH. 1904. Department Notes. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904, Interco'legiate. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN, 1905. HERBERT HAROLD GOODENOUGH. 1905. 



Terms: 91.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside el United States and Canada, 20c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
Coliege Senate, 
Readir.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottingham, Pres. Athletic Association. 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. Base Ball Association. 

E. B. Snell. Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

R. H. Robertson, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
J. G. Cook, Manager. 
A. L. Peck. Manager. 
H. L. Knight. Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Edi-tbri&ls. 



Now that the Prom, is over, indoor baseball prac- 
tice will begin at once and with the material which 
Capt. Ahearn is rallying the prospects augur well for 
the coming season. The first requisite for a success- 
ful team is a good supply of raw material ; the second, 
a competent coach and the third a hearty cooperation 
of the two coupled with the financial and moral 
support of the student body. These requisites are not 
beyond our reach and a good team with a worthy 
schedule should be the outcome. 



We lately published an editorial recommending the 
formation of a Press club in this college and since 
have had reason to infer that the suggestion has met 
with the approval of many students. As yet, how- 
ever, no one has taken the initial step in the organiza- 
tion of such a club. Our baseball season will be with 
us in the near future and if a press club Is to be organ- 
ized it should be in operation at that time. Believing 
that such an organization would greatly aid in adver 



tising this institution and that it would tend to ellmi- 
nate many misrepresentations concerning us, which 
appear in the press, we will take it upon ourselves to 
ask such students as are interested in the matter to 
meet in the Y. M. C. A. rooms at 7 p. m., Tuesday, 
March 3, there to discuss and adopt measures for the 
furtherence of the above project. Let every student, 
who is desirous of having a press club established In 
this college be present. 



A word of commendation is due the members of 
the Junior Prom, committee. To them must be 
given the credit of carrying through one of the most 
brilliant social events ever held at this college. Each 
year the junior class finds itself battling against the 
same proposition, that of holding a Prom, which shall 
eclipse or at least uphold the standard of its prede- 
cessors and each succeeding year finds the custom 
Of a Junior Prom, more and more of a white elephant 
upon the hands of the committee chosen to carry out 
the affair. Yet notwithstanding their knowledge of 
the trials which have come to classes in the past each 






9 8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



year finds a ready acceptance of the arduous duties by 
the hands of new committees. It is this spirit of 
enterprise and push which is as much to be com- 
mended as is the fact that the efforts prove success- 
ful. The value of these social functions to the partici- 
pants as well as to the college as a whole can hardly 
be overrated. In them, nearly as much as in any 
department of the college, lies the material for an 
education. In neglecting this part of college life the 
opportunities for obtaining a well rounded and broad- 
ened mental training is seriously handicapped. In 
these formal promenades as well as in the less formal 
hops there is to be obtained a training which is scarce- 
ly obtainable elsewhere in a small college town and 
which cannot be consistently overlooked. Far too 
often is this fact not sufficently realized and upon 
graduation the college man finds that neglected oppor- 
tunities along the social line react to his detriment. 



obligations concerning the wellfare of the institution. 
He becomes duty bound to use his efforts in upholding 
the good name and furthering the best interests of his 
Alma Mater. In no better way can he do this than by 
laboring in behalf of his college publication. It Is the 
college paper in the hands of the preparatory school 
student which in the mind of the latter presents a 
strong argument for. or against, the college in which 
it is published. If an Inferior paper is sent out to the 
exchanges the college suffers in consequence of the 
poor opinion aroused in those schools to which it must 
look for students. The question of support or non- 
support of the college paper, either from a financial or 
from a literary standpoint, is a vital one and should be 
considered carefully by the student body. In its con- 
sideration, fraternity and class interests should be 
set aside and the plea of indisposition be discarded. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



But three days will elapse before the close of the 
competition for places on the Sicnal Board and yet 
out of the entire three lower classes, not a baker's 
dozen of men have had sufficient confidence in their 
powers or enough interest in their college paper to 
make an attempt to gain places on its board of editors. 
Nor is this the first year in the history of the paper 
that such a state of affairs has been seen. Year after 
year the fact presents Itself that often men with the 
best literary and business talents do not exert them- 
selves In order to reach positions in which their 
talents might be of help to the college and wherein 
they would be cultivated to the good of man. 
It Is perhaps but natural that a student should 
not care to take upon himself arduous duties which 
bring with them no remuneration but although 
the duties of an editor of a college paper may be to a 
certain extent arduous, they nevertheless bring with 
them a substantial remuneration even though it adds 
nothing to his cash account. The experience in 
writing clearly, and forcibly, and in transacting business 
in a business-like manner is no small item in a man's 
education. Even the criticisms which he must ex- 
pect to receive redound to his own benefit and aid in 
fitting him for his life work. And, again, laying aside 
Individual reasons there is a still more urgent reason 
why the student should strive to support his college 
paper. Upon entering college a man takes upon himself 



OFFICIAL NOTICE. 

The next issue of the College Signal the last 
issue to be gotten out by the present Board of 
Editors, will appear March 18. It seems advisable 
to publish at this time the names of competitors for 
positions on the Board. E. A. Back, *04, A. W. Gil- 
bert, '04, and A. W. Swain, '05, are eligible for elec- 
tion. The following men together with those who 
may contribute material to our columns on or before 
March 1st may become eligible by submitting at least 
one more article on or before March 21st: G. E. 
O'Hearn, '04. C. F. Ellwood. '04. J. C. Richardson, 
'05, P. F. Williams, '05. A. D. Farrar, '06. H. G.. 
Chapman, '06. R. W. Peakes, '06 and A. A. 

Racicot. '06. 

Editor-in-chief. 



FACULTY RULINGS. 

The faculty has passed the following rules governing 
conditions: " When a student is conditioned in three 
or more studies (not Including cutovers) of a term, he 
shall be dropped back into the succeeding class, also, 

Any student who has entered college on certificate 
and is conditioned in one or more studies during his 
freshman year may be dropped from college. " 

These rules went Into effect Feb. 5 and were 
thought to be necessary in order to raise the standard 
of the college and because it has been found after a 
fair trial, that the certificates admitting men to this 
college can not be depended upon to show the ability 
or the work done by men so entering. 



99 



AN EPISODE. 

(Concluded.) 

•' Well, isn't this strange that you should know Don." 
said Florence, as they sped along, •' you begin to 
seem like a life-long friend of the family, for Don and 
Clara and Frank and I, have been chums from child- 
hood ; we were as much in one home as in the 
other." 

" I hope I may become an intimate friend of the 
family," said Cyril, " for do you know MissChadwick, 
I believe if I could mingle with such a family as yours, 
life would mean far more to me. I'm tired of the 
artificiality of society, its insincerity discourages every 
ambition that might arise in me. I always longed for 
the friendship of some one with whom I couid talk as 
I felt, without fear of their being offended at what I 
might say. Friends with whom the conventionalities 
of society count but little. There was a coterie of 
us at M — who met for mutual appreciation, and I 
found in Frank one whom I could count as a friend. 
And when I met his family I knew why. I have 
found you one of the sincerest of families, you have 
made me feel my welcome, and I have come to 
believe the world is not so false as I pictured it." 

" I am glad you have found a welcome that satisfies 
you," said Florence, " we always try to make friends 
feel at home, and Mr. Wolvert, I am glad you are of 
the opinion I am as regards our social positions. I 
think we shall make capital friends. I suppose if I 
should enter • real society ' as the world calls it I 
would shock many of the stately mothers. But I 
cannot accept all of the customs laid down by the 
rules of etiquette, they are not living, they are dead 
customs. Why must we act so unnaturally outside 
our own homes ? Would it not be to greater and 
better advantage for each to appear as real, living 
beings with a little more of a touch of nature that 
makes all the world akin, than to be mere puppets 
with but a few stock expressions ready on the lips, 
and a smile where it should come in, in they play. I 
can easily imagine that you were called a cynic, Mr. 
Wolvert and I don't blame you in the least. I know I 
should become disgusted if I were compelled to live 
in such an atmosphere. But don't forget that such 
does not encompass all social life. There is much of 
the natural element to be found, and where It is found, 
life is more pleasant and cheerful." 



" I realize that now, and shall look for it more 
closely, and enter into that life wherever I can. And 
I am glad that your ideas agree with mine. 1 think 
if we were more natural with one another, and express 
our likes and dislikes plainly, there would be fewer 
enemies in the world. I have always been struck 
with that idea when reading the life of some noted 
man, whose eccentricities in this direction made him 
famous. During his whole life he would express 
himself freely and plainly regardless of time, place 
or audience. He simply told the truth as he felt It. 
Some perhaps were angry with him for the time being, 
and perhaps offended also, but it could not last. 
They knew he was sincere in all he did and said. 
They could depend upon him. He would not love 
you one minute and hnte you the next, if he did not 
like one he manifested It openly, not behind one's 
back. There was no double dealing as is too often 
the case in ■ society.' Life has a purpose to such a 
one, and one is made stronger and truer for meeting 
such a man." 

•' You will find father and mother of that nature as 
you learn to know them, and that was one of the first 
lessons we were taught, to be true to ourselves." 

" And now to put our theories Into practice, Miss. 
Chadwick. I must say something. Do not think worse 
of me. but be patient with my weakness. I want 
you to understand me so that we can be better friends, 
if that is possible, Miss Chadwick," and he com- 
pelled her gaze, " I have learned to care a great deal 
for you during this past week. I was always a great 
doubter of love at sight. But you have commanded 
my love; and I do confess that I love you. you have 
opened to me a new vision of woman — of the true 
woman, the noblest work of the Creator. No, do 
not." as he placed a hand gently on her lips. " do not 
tell me what I cannot bear to hear. I know I have 
no right to ask anything of you. Let me love you In 
the silence of my thought, Think of what I say, and 
if in time 1 should come to be of use to the world. I 
have learned to know through you. let me come to 
you then and tell you more." 

In answer, Florence placed her hand softly upon 
Cyril's and looking him trustingly in the face said, 
•• Mr. Wolvert, you have paid me the highest compli- 
ment that can fall to any woman, and I thank you. 
It is but just that I tell you my thoughts. I have felt 






100 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



for some time that your respect was borne out of 
more than admiration, and the thought has been very 
pleasant to me. But ! too have realized the worth of 
your character and admire your strength and man- 
hood ;" and her honest brown eyes met his without a 
waver. " No," as she stayed his hand, •« not yet. 
Let us learn to know each other more fully, or we may 
become disappointed and repent any haste. Let us 
be true to each other and be friends until we 

become — ." 

•• Dearer," he interrupted smiling, as he raised her 
fingers to his lips. " I have pinned my lady's banner 
to my sleeve, may it give me wisdom to be true to 
the world— and to thee," he whispered. 

•• But see," exclaimed Florence, " they are far 
ahead, and Don is calling to us. We are forgetting 
our company." and a happy smile met his glance. 

•• Well?" she queried as Don called out to them. 

•• What have you two, been doing, working out some 
problem of philosophy, or entranced with the beauties 

of the day." 

••Yes!" they both exclaimed. Then looked at 

each other and laughed. 

•• Oh, I see," said Don, as he turned and resumed 

driving. 

- No, you don't see. Mr. Smarty." laughed Flor- 
ence, "for the subject is too deep for your mind. 
But let us hurry or we shall not reach the house 
before supper." 

The sun was just sinking as they entered the 

driveway to the house. 

•• Do you recall those words of the poet. Miss Chad- 
wick, so often set to music ? 

■■ The night has a thousand eyes. 

And the day but one ; 
Yet the light of the bright world dies 

With the dying sun ; 
The mind has a thousand eyes, 

And the heart but one ; 
Yet the light of a whole life dies 
When love is done." 
•• 1 would change the last lines 

The light of a life revives 
When love is come. 

Is that true?" 

•• Perhaps." she answered smiling. 
- Well, this is indeed a pleasure." exclaimed Frank, 
as he met them at the piazza. " Come In all of you 



and warm up. That naughty sister of mine ran off 
and left me ; but then 1 suppose she wanted to be true 
to her duties as hostess and show her guest the places 
of interest of our noted town." And he shot a mis- 
chievous glance at Florence. 

•• Well I doubt whether sne attended strictly to her 

duties," said Don. 

.. 1 appeal to the court," responded Florence, glanc- 
ing toward Cyril. 

•• You were too good." replied Cyril, his eyes shin- 
ing with a happy light. 

•• The court has decreed. Long live the judge," 

cried Frank. 

•• Now, do be sensible. Frank. But come let us 
adjourn to the sitting room. And you'll excuse us a 
few minutes," said Florence as she led Clara off to her 

mother. 

" Well, this seems almost like old times again, 
said Frank. " And to think that you and Wolvert 
knew each other long before 1 knew of the existence 
of such a chap. You scandalous fellow, how is it 
you never mentioned his name in my hearing." 

•• You see it's just this way— to tell the truth." and 
he leaned over toward Frank, and said in a hoarse 
whisper, •' to tell the truth— don't say a word to Don 
- 1 had almost forgotten about him ; our correspond- 
ence has been so diligently neglected." and Don gave 
him a wicked punch in the ribs. 

- It's unfortunate you didn't get here before, Don, 
said Frank, " we leave for H— to-morrow ; but see 
here, can't you drop in on us for a few days. You're 
not pressed for time at present are you ? All right 
we'll look for you then the 20th. But here come the 
girls, let us eat drink and be merry for to-morrow 

we — . 

••Grind," suggested Cyril. 

"Yes, but I'll never live to see the day when you 
will." laughed Frank. •• Now for some music." And 
the merry party broke up only when the stars shed 
their gentle influence on the sleepy world. 

******* 

The train was ready to start and the bst good-byes 

were given. 

- How shall I learn to know," whispered Cyril, as 
he held her hand. " I must understand." 

•• You may call and discover for yourself." she said 

simply. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



101 



" Aufwiedersehen." he called, as the train started. 
" And may the ' wieder ' be soon," he said to himself 
as he enfered the car. 

"Well, by Jove, she's a stunner, Frank," he said 
as they seated themselves. " thanks for the introduc- 
tion." And they both laughed as they thought of the 
first meeting. 

In a few hours they were once more settled in the 
old room, and it really looked cosy. In fact to Cyril 
it seemed new. 

" Jone." he said, •' 1 didn't know we had such a 
room. This seems a little more homelike than it 
used to." 

" Yes," said Frank, as he lounged back with his 
feet on his desk, " I suppose you're sorry you ever 
ventured to Saxonville. It must have been an awful 
bore to you, and really I had a hard time to entertain 
you. Florence is a queer girl I know." And his 
eyes twinkled. 

For answer Cyril swung himself around and grasping 
Frank's shoulders, looked him square in the eyes. 
For several minutes they stared, then his hands 
dropped. 

" That's all right, old man, I understand." said 
Frank, and gave him a hearty grip. There was quite 
a deal of comment on the change in Cyril, and it was 
noticed that he was called out of town quite often. 
He was subject to not a little chaff in consequence 
but he answered all with a smile. 

* * * . * * 

N. B. A. This sounds as though it had a happy 
ending ; well It didn't. They quarreled. Of course 
they oughtn't to in a story, but they did. You see he 
didn't understand. When he did it was too late. 

Raymoth. 



COMMUNICATION. 

In 1885 there was organized at Lehigh university 
the first chapter of the honorary Greek letter frater- 
nity. Tan Beta Pi. whose object is.to state the pream- 
ble of its constitution : " To mark in a fitting manner 
those who have conferred honor upon their Alma 
Mater by a high grade of scholarship as undergradu- 
ates, or by their attainments as alumni ; and to foster 
a spirit of liberal culture in the technical and scientific 
schools of America." and since then chapters have 



been established in the states of Michigan. New Jer- 
sey. Indiana and Illinois. 

The question naturally comes to one, — who are el- 
igible to membership or what grade of scholarship 
does one have to attain in order to be classed a Tan 
Beta Pi man. The highest standing Sophomore is 
eligible at the beginning of his Junior year. The next 
highest seven are eligible at the beginning of the sec- 
ond term of junior year and the second highest eight 
at the beginning of senior year. All those who up to 
the beginning of senior year have maintained an 
average rank in scholarship in the first quarter of the 
class, with a general average grade of not less than 
seventy-five per cent, are eligible at the commence- 
ment of senior year. 

The insignia of the fraternity is a watch key of 
gold, worn as a charm, the main part of which Is 
shaped like the bent of a trestle and has engraved on 
the observe side the motto and other secret charac- 
ters of the society and on the reverse side the uame 
of the chapter and the name and class year of the 
owner. Thus it will be seen that the badge serves, 
not only as the insignia of the fraternity ; but also, in 
a way, as a college, class and identification badge. 

At graduation a member of the fraternity is given a 
certificate stating that during his college course he 
maintained a rank in scholarship which places him In 
the first fourth of his class and is therefore granted all 
the honors, insignia and privileges belonging to the 
society. This certificate is signed by various officers 
and is given the association seal. 

The fraternity is similar to the honorary Phi Beta 
Kappa fraternity but is designed for students in tech- 
nical and scientific colleges Instead of for those in 
classical colleges. It is one of the greatest honors of 
a colLgiate course to be a member of either society 
and is an honor which is striven for. 

Will not the students of the Mass. Agr'l College see 
to it that a chapter is installed there ? In 1892 a 
chapter was installed at the Agricultural College of 
Michigan, which college is similar in its aims and 
work to M. A. C. but is of no higher standard. A 
preliminary to such an installation would be for those 
who are eligible according to preceding statements to 
make application as the constitution directs. Copies 
of the constitution and other information relative to 
the society may be obtained by addressing Mr. B. C. 






102 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



103 



Waldenmaier, 122 Waldron St.. Lafayette. Indiana. 
Personally. I should like to see a chapter estab- 
lished at M. A. C. which would be known as the Al- 
pha chapter of Massachusetts and which would, with- 
out a doubt, raise the standard of scholarship of the 
institution and hold out a deserved reward to the 

scholar. 

Geo. A. Witherell. Ex- 04. 



TRAPPED BY A BIRD. 

It is a hot. windless day on the desert. The cactus 
clumps seem even more grey than usual, and not a 
cloud is to be seen In the sky. 

The only signs of life seen are some vultures, sail- 
ing high up in the air. seeming to need no effort to 
keep themselves there, so motionless are they. On 
a large flat rock a huge rattlesnake lies, stretched out 
at full length, basking in the warm sun while he sleeps. 
Suddenly, with a satisfied little chirrup, a bird, no 
larger than a wren, hops out from behind a clump of 
cacti and stands surveying the sleeping rattler. Then 
with another chirrup he hops noiselessly away, and. 
going to the same clump from which he came, be- 
gins tearing away, with beak and claws, the leaves 
which are covered with sharp spines. Then, quietly, 
with infinite pains, he takes a piece in his bill and 
softly hops to where the rattlesnake lies still sleeping, 
and then drops the prickly leaf down by the rattler's 
tail stands looking at the snake for an instant, turns 
around and goes to work to pull off another leaf which 
he deposits near the other end. always working so as 
to bring the wall of cactus leaves up towards the head 
of the rattlesnake. Slowly the leaves accumulate 
around him. until he is entirely surrounded by a layer 
of cactus leaves probably three inches high. Then 
the bird works faster, and. instead of walking back and 
forth with the leaves in his beak, half runs, half flies, 
with wings outstretched, to and from the cactus 
clumps ; the wall grows higher and higher, and still 
the snake sleeps, all unaware of the trouble which is 
fast closing about him. 

At last the thorny wall is completed and surrounds 
the rattlesnake to a height of over a foot, and is so 
close to his body that he cannot turn without stabbing 
himself with the sharp unfeeling spines of the leaves. 
The bird, after the last leaf has been laid in place. 
retreats, chirrups and cackles almost like a human 



being, for he has done something of which he is proud. 
He jumps and hops about, goes through the queerest 
antics for the space of about ten minutes, then he 
stops suddenly as if he had been shot and walks care- 
fully over to where the snake still peacefully sleeps. 
He hops to its head and utters an ear piercing scream 
of defiance and triumph. 

The snake starts. One of the spines is forced into 
his body. He moves in order to get away from it, 
and is pricked by another. 

Then begins a battle for life. He darts, turns this 
way and that. In vain efforts to escape. Every move 
he makes causes him to feel greater pain, for the 
long spikes of the cactus leaves prick him deeply, and. 
in his struggles, he breaks some of the points off. and 
they remain in his body to torment him the more. 
Finally, tired of his struggles, the snake lies quiet for 
a time, and the only thing which shows he is alive is 
a convulsive twitching of the tail. 

All this time the bird is carrying more and more 
leaves and piling them up about the rattler so as to 
strengthen the walls about him, as in his terrific strug- 
gles he might break through and escape. Every now 
and then he stops and utters his piercing cry. which In 
the stillness of the desert sounds absolutely fiendish. 
The snake arouses from his stupor, and begins one 
long, last struggle for life. He lashes about so furi- 
ously that the barrier about him shakes with the vio- 
lence of his exertions. But all is in vain, and. finding 
himself hopelessly trapped, he turns upon himself, and. 
rather than die a death of slow starvation, sinks his 
own fangs into his body. An involuntary shudder 
passes through him and all is over. The little bird 
has succeeded in killing the king of the desert ; not 
through force, but through cunning and industry. This 
done the bird does not eat his victim, but pecking at 
it a few times, hops away, and leaves a feast for the 

cayotes and vultures. 

G. H. Chapman. '06. 



JUNIOR PROMENADE. 

The annual promenade given by the Junior class 
was held in the Drill Hall Friday evening, Feb. 20, 
and as a social event it was preeminetly a success. 
The condition of the weather, always a prominent 
factor at such a time, could not have been better suited 
for the occasion and the heavy fall of snow of a few 



days previous rendered sleighing highly enjoyable for 
the following day. 

The quality of the decorations in the hall eclipsed 
anything seen there in recent years.the entire wall sur- 
face being covered with evergreen, pierced at short 
intervals with incandescent lights and over hung with 
streamers of white crape paper and bunting. Maroon 
and white streamers attached over the center of the hall 
diverged in all directions entirely obscuring the heavy 
beams above. At the south end of the hall under the 
balcony were placed the usual alcoves partitioned by 
screens and palms over which was swung the historic 
shell from each seat of which glistened an electric 
light. At the north end of the hall guarded by the two 
field rifles was placed the patronesses' alcove above 
which was worked an immense evergreen banner bear- 
ing the numerals of the class. Around the hall the 
usual profusion of palms was placed.giving a semi-seclu- 
sion to the numerous easy chairs with their burdens 
of gay sofa pillows. In the center of the floor, upon a 
decorated stand, the Springfield Orchestrial club ren- 
dered the following progjam : Two-step, Our Leader, 
Bigelow ; waltz. Sally in our Alley, Englander ; two- 
step. Bill Bailey, Morse ; waltz. Blue Danube, Strauss ; 
two-step. Uunder the Bamboo Tree, Johnson ; waltz, 
Prince of Pilsen, Laders ; five-step, Animation. Heed : 
waltz, Babbie. Turst ; two-step, The Bell Boy. Ashton; 
waltz. New Year's Dream. Mullen; two-step, Blaze 
Away, Holzman; waltz. Valse Bleue. Marges; waltz, 
In the Good Old Summer Time, Challaway ; two-step, 
Mr. Dooley. Rogers ; waltz, Maid Marian, De Koven ; 
two-step. A Tablet in the Hall of Fame, Caryll ; waltz, 
The Belle of Bohemia. Englander; waltz, In The 
Sweet Bye and Bye. Tilzer; two-step. A Frangesa. 
Costa ; waltz, The Rose of Mexico. Dunn ; two-step, 
When The Boys Come Home. Schwartz; waltz. The 
First Violin. Witt ; two step Please Let Me Sleep. 
Tilzer ; waltz. Home Sweet Home. 

The Patronesses were Mrs. H. H. Goodell. Mrs. C. 
A. Goessmann. Mrs. W. P. Brooks, Mrs. G. E.Stone. 
Mrs. F. A. Waugh and Mrs. J. B. Linsey. 

The dance orders were a handsome production of 
Dreka of Philadelphia, being of pearl undressed kid. 
tied with the same material and lettered in gold. 
Brown of Amherst catered. 

The guests were Prof, and Mrs. W. P. Brooks. Prof, 
land Mrs. F. A. Waugh. Prof, and Mrs. G. E. Stone. 



Prof. P. B. Hasbrouch, Prof. R. E. Smith and Miss 
Smith of Amherst, Prof. L. R. Herrick and Miss 
French of Amherst. Prof. F. B. Loomis. Mr. and Mrs. 
John Nash of Amherst. Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Mills of 
Amherst, Mr. G. A. Drew and Miss Rachel Brooks of 
Amherst, C. I. Lewis of Hyde Park and Miss Good- 
enough of Amherst. Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Atkins. J. S. 
Eaton. Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Williams. 

NINETEEN HUNDRED AND THREE. 

Mr. W.E. Allen and Miss Purtell of Fitchburg. Mr. 
N. F. Monahan and Miss Hunt of Newton. Mr. G. L. 
Barrus and Miss Ella Ford of Ashville. Mr. J. G. Cook 
and Miss Gook of Clayton. Mr. W. V. Tower and Miss 
McCandiesh of Boston. Mr. E. G. Proulx and Miss 
Proulx of Hatfield. Mr. C. P. Halligan and Miss 
Halligan of Boston. Mr. P. W. Brooks rnd Miss 
Stevens of Stoneham. 

NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FOUR. 

Mr. H. M. White and Miss Farrar of Springfield. 
Mr. C. H. Griffin and Miss Quirk of Holyoke. Mr. G. 
E. O'Hearn and Miss Longley of Brookfield. Mr. R. 
A. Quigley and Miss Reynolds of Brockton. Mr. P. F. 
Staples and Miss Gregg of Dorchester. Mr. A. W. 
Gilbert and Miss Ward of Brookfield. Mr. J. W. Gregg 
and Miss Strait of Dorchester, Mr. E. A. Back and 
Miss Back of Florence. Mr. M. F. Ahearn and Miss 
Sanborn of Salem. Mr. S. R. Parker and Miss Fulton 
of Lynn. Mr. E. S. Fulton and Miss Fulton of Lynn. 
Mr. A. L. Peck and Miss Root of Amherst. 

NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIVE. 

Mr. W. A Munson and Miss St. John of Teledo. O., 
Mr. G. W. Patch and Miss Cathcart of Waltham. Mr. 
A. N. Swain and Miss Dodge of Charleston. Mr. R. L. 
Allen and Miss Barker of Somerville. Mr. C. Z. 
Whitaker and Miss True of Holyoke. Mr. H. H. Good- 
enough and Miss Currie of Hartford. Conn.. Mr. P. F. 
Williams and Miss Bruce of So. Framingham. 



DR. HINDS 

BEFORE THE SENIOR DIVISION IN ENTOMOLOCY. 

Dr. Warren E. Hinds. '99. who has been spending 
a few days with friends in Amherst spoke before the 
senior and graduate students in Entomology at the 
Entomological laboratory on the morning of Feb. 19. 
upon the Texan Cotton Boll Weevil. Dr. Hinds, as 
field assistant in the Department of Agriculture, is 



t 



104 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



105 



making an exhaustive study of thU pest which ^ s 
causing serious losses to the cotton crop m the Sou ■ 

The weevil is common over nearly the entire cot- 
ton growing belt and. owing to Its habits of feeding 
and oviposition. is a difficult insect to control. The 
planters futhermore are loath to give up their anti- 
P q Ied methods and adopt a system of cultivation 
which would insure a great reduction the , p e . 
Dr Hinds gave an interesting account of the life his 
tory of the weevil, together with many facts concern- 
ing'its habits and history, stating that it is a native of 
th 8 e Yucutan Peninsula but has spread as far north a 

the Indian Territory and is a serious enemy to the 

cotton crop in Cuba. 



BASKETBALL. 



MARCH THEATRE BOOKINGS. 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

Mar 5. Andrew Mack in his new play. 

6. N. C. Goodwin and Maxine Elliott in - Iht 

Altar of Friendship." 
11 , •• Quincy Adams Sawyer." 
13 -In Old Kentucky." 

,4'. Mrs. Le Movne in •• Among Those Present. 
16. Gertrude Coghlan in -Alice of Old Vin- 

cennes." 
18. Smith College Glee Club. ^ 
20, Otis Skinner in " Lazarre. 
21 The Burgamaster. 
23 and week. The Aubrey Stock Co. 

HOLYOKE OHERA HOUSE. 

Mar. 3. " A Jolly American Tramp." 
6, Stuart Robson. 
10. "Quincy Adams Sawyer." 
17, St. Jerome Society. 
20 " Liberty Bells." 

23 and week. Corse Paytons Stock Co.. Mati- 
nees daily after Monday. 

EMPIRE THEATRE, HOLYOKE. 

Mar. 2 and week, with daily matinees, Hascrout Com- 

edy Co. 
Mar. 9. 10, 1 1 ." Vanity Fair." 

12, 13. 14. " A Hidden Crime. 
29, 30 31. " A Gambler's Daughter." 
One of the'features ofthe" Dartmouth 1904 Junior 
Prom, week May 18. will be an original comic opera 
by C. G. Howes. 



Sophomores. 45; Freshmen. 12. 
Friday evening, Feb. 13. the Freshmen basketball 
team sustained a severe defeat, in the drill hall, a 
the hands of their rivals, the Sophomores. It was 
Naughty-five's game from the blowing of the whistte . 
in fact they threw goals almost at will. The Fresh 
m en were anywhere but in the right place, bumping 
into each other, attempting to shoot goals from im- 
possible positions and becoming confused generally. 
As a result of this stage fright, the score at the calling 
of time was '05. 49 ; '06. 6. The second half, how- 
ever told a different story, being much more closely 
contested and consequently much more interest.ng 
from the spectator's point of view. The game was. 
under the circumstances, noticeably free from slug- 
ging and foul playing. For the Sophomores. Taylo 
excelled, throwing the most baskets and covering a 
good deal of ground. Whitaker also played a good 
game. For '06 Wood and Cutter did the best play- 
ing. Following is the line up: ^^ 

SOPHOMORES. r g Wood 

Whitaker. r. f. £ g ' Cutter 

Hunt, 1. f. c Spurr? Farrar 

Taylor, c - r . !., Kennedy 

Holcomb. r. g. fc ( chapman 

"tir^fieid-Tayior ,1. Whitaker 5. Holcomb, 
Brett 2 Hunt. Spur, 2, Wood 2. Cutter 2. ***>«** 
-Hunt. Referee-Aheam. Umptre-Snell. Score Soph 
omores 45. Freshmen 12. 

Massachusetts, 44 ; Southbr.dce Y. M. C. A., 22^ 
On the evening of the 14th Massachusetts defeated 
the Southbrldge Y. M. C. A. in a game of basketba 
' by the score of 44 to 22. During the first half IM 
game was very close and exciting, several plays re- 
markable for their brilliancy and luck being executed. 
Snell was especially lucky in throwing goals. Snell 
started the ball rolling by throwingtwo goals for Mass- 
achusets Then Curran of Southbridge evened things 
up and at the end of the half Massachusetts had a 
lead of only three points. 

" In the second half our team put much more vim 
into their work and Quigley. who did not thro* r a goa 
in the first half, did some brilliant work, throwing 
even goals. While there was but little roughness 
oug out the game, fouls were frequently called on 
both sides and nearly all of the fouls added to the 



score. For Massachusetts Quigley and Snell did the 
best work while Curran and Sanders excelled for 
Southbridge. Sanders of Southbridge, although a 
little fellow, played pluckily and had a nice eye for the 
baskets. The summary : 

MASSACHUSETTS. SOUTHBRIDGE Y. M. C. A. 

Hunt, 1. g. r. f., Sanders 

Cook. r. g. 1. f.. Hal! (capt) 

Snell. c. c. Hay 

Quigley, 1. f. r. g.. Curran 

Fulton, r. f. Cogswell, 1. g. 

Coals from floor — Quigley 7, Cook 4. Curran 3. Sanders 
3, Fulton 2, Hunt 2. Cogswell, Hay. Goals from fouls — 
Hunt 4, Curran 3, Sanders 2, Hay, Cook, Snell. Score — 
Massachusetts 44. Southbridge Y. M. C. A. 22. Umpire- 
Hunt. Referee — Couden. Timekeeper — Haskell. Scorer 
— Chapman. Time — 20 minute halves, 

Williams, 41 ; .Massachusetts, 8. 

In an uninteresting game Williams wen from the 
home team in a game of basket-ball played at Wil- 
liamstown last Wednesday afternoon. in the very 
first of the game Snell threw a splendid goal from a 
mix-up which was followed immediately by a neat 
goal, thrown by Vose. Williams then threw a num- 
ber of baskets in close succession. During the second 
half our team work was somewhat improved and Quig- 
ley made two baskets followed by a sensational long 
shot by Snell. From this time the team work of both 
sides grew weak and the game ended in the above 
score. The line up : 

Massachusetts. . williams. 

Hunt. r. f. I. f., Appell 

Cook, 1. g. r. f., Vose 

Snell, c. c. Neild 

Fulton, r. I. 1 . g . Conell 

Quigley, 1. f. r. g.,Dunn, Cardner 

Score — Williams 41, Massachusetts 8. Coals — Appell 6, 
Neild 5. Vose 5. Conell 3. Snell 2. Quigley 2. Gardner 1, 
Fouls— Appell. Vose. Hunt. Goal from foul — Vose. Um- 
pires — Taylor, and Linsley. Referee — Seeley. 



Colleg? jMot^s- 



— A number of students spent Washington's birth- 
day at their homes. 

— R. H. Robertson has been called home by the 
death of his brother. 

— The Juniors have adopted President Roosevelt's 
Motto '• Strenuous Life. " 



— Mr. E. F. Elwood has recently been the guest of 
his son, E. F. Elwood '04. 

— The price of board at the College dining hall has 
been reduced to $3.25 per week. 

— The class of 1906 now stands high and dry with 
no class organization of any kind. 

— George H. Lamson, '03, is confined to his bed 
with an attack of German measles, 

— Representative Fahey of Pittsfield spent Sunday 
with his brother J. Fahey of the junior class. 

— The College band will render a concert at the 
North Amherst church Friday evening. Feb. 27. 

— Hascal Dodge, the contractor who built the new 

dining hall was taken suddenly ill and died on Feb. 10. 

— The committee on decoration for the Junior 

Prom, deserve great credit for the excellent work they 

have done. 

— The annual meeting of the Connecticut Valley 
Alumni Association was held in the New Ralliskeller 
of Heublein Hotel, Feb. 20. 

Mr. Daniel Dwight and Mr. W. W. Macomber of 
the Short Course have expressed their intention of 
entering this college next fall. 

— Mesrs. C. M. Carter, A. R. Paul. T. C. Pray. C. 
E. Merril of the sophomore class have left college. 
R. A. Bacon of the freshman class has also left 
college. 

— A special car is now being run from the Amherst 
house to the College grounds at quarter before eight 
each morning in order to accommodate those who wish 
to reach chapel from town. 

— Frederick R. Church '02 has been appoined Agri- 
culturalist at the Hatch Experiment Station in the place 
of H. M. Thomson who resigned. Mr. Church starts 
on his new duties the first of March. 

— The Short Course class are planning a trip for 
March 7th to Barre Mass., where they will visit the 
farm of Mr. G. H. Ellis. In the evening they will hold 
a class banquet at the Barre Hotel. 

— Capt. M. F. Ahearn has started indoor practice 
with the base ball squad by giving them muscle exer- 
cises which will soon be followed by batting and throw- 
ing. Nineteen men are out. They are: Barrus, Brooks, 
Cook, Halligan Proulx, Ahearn (Capt.), O'Hearn, 
Hobert. Adams. Hunt. Patch, Walker, Griffin, 
Thomson, Kennedy, Taft, Wood, H. P. Harvey and 
Lamson. 






io6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



I 



—Professor Waugh has just received notice of the 
award of an honor prize " for collection of apples 
grown in Massachusetts " (Horticultural Department, 
II. A. C.) and shown at the annual exhibition of the 
Fruit Growers' Association of Nova Scotia. 

—According to the provisions of the New Militia 
Bill, any officer of the Volunteer Militia can, upon 
the consent of the Governor, pursue a course of mili- 
tary instruction in any military college, receiving while 
thus occupied a remuneration of one dollar per day. 

—The Senior class has elected officers as follows : 
President, W. E. Tottingham ; vice-president, S. C. 
Bacon ; secretary and treasurer, G. D. Jones ; class 
captain, G. L Barrus ; committee to chose Bacca- 
laureate speaker. H. J. Franklin, W. V. Tower. S. C. 
Bacon. 



Spring Clothes. 



Just the sorts that young men will appreciate. 
There's a collection here that absolutely cannot 
be found elsewhere in Western New England. 
Will you come and see it? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 

Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 



Springkield, 



Mass. 



Mrs. Jane Lathrop Stanford has decided to erect a 
magnificent new library building at the Leland Stan- 
ford, lr., Univ. It is to be the handsomest and most 
costly structure of Its kind in this continent. 




PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 

New York 

Central 

Lines 



THROUGH COACHES 



BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 

TO AND FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER, 



SLEEPING CARS 



DINING CARS 



KKAD DOW1I. 

9.06 A.M. f>.02 P.M. 

Mi " 6.4ft " 
10.00 " 6.ft8 " 
10.50 " 8.01 " 
11.50 " 9.03 " 



AS FOLLOWS 

It. Amherst 
ar. Palmer 
lv. Palmer 
nr. Worcester 
ar. Boston 



KKAD II'. 
ar. 9.06 A.M. 8.36 P.M. 
1 v. 8.20 " 7.51 " 
ar.7-86 " 7.36 " 
lv.6.25 " 6.10 '* 
lv. 5.00 " 5.00 " 





DAIL\ SERVICE. 


To ALBANY, 


9 Trains 


To BUFFALO, 


8 Trains 


To CHICAGO, 


7 Trains 


To CINCINNATI, 


3 Trains 


To DETROIT, 


5 Trains 


To ST. LOUIS, 


3 Trains 


Through the 




Famous . . • 




Berkshire 


mils 


♦ ♦ ♦ 



AND THK 

Hlbanp 6ateu>ap, 

Which it always Open. 



For further mforn,^^ 



107 



Alu 



mm. 



'92. — H. M. Thompson, who has worked as assis- 
tant at the Hatch Experiment station for several years, 
has accepted a position as superintendent of a wealthy 
gentleman's estate in Thompson, Conn. 

'95.— A. F. Burgess, State Inspector of Nurseries 
of Ohio read a paper before the meeting of the asso- 
ciation of Economic Entomologists at Washington, 
entitled " Economic Notes on Coccinellidae." At the 
election of officers of the association for the ensuing 
year, he was elected secretary and treasurer. 

'95.— D. C. Potter, Fairhaven. Mass. 

'97. — P. H. Smith is, this week, collecting samples 
of feeds and food-stuffs \r\ the eastern part of the state. 

'97. — G. D. Leavens will give a talk on - Grass 
Culture " before the Worcester County Horticultural 
Society on Feb. 26. 1903. 

'99. — Herbert Warner Dana has recently accepted 
the position of advertising manager for Almy Bigelow 
& Washburn's department store at Salem, Mass. 

'00. — Y. H. Canto was in town recently. 

'00.— The marriage is announced of Henry L. 
Crane to Miss Olive McElhinney of Norwood. Mass., 
at Providence, R. I., Jan. 28, 1903. 

'00. — E. K. Atkins, civil engineer, Is laying out the 
road for the new electric line between Ashfield and 
Millers Falls. 

'00.— A. W. Morrill has just published in the thir- 
ty-fifth volume of the " Canadian Entomologist " an 
account of the " Life History and Description of the 
Strawberry Aleyrodes, Aleyrodes Packardi, N. P. S. " 
It contains a comparison between the larval and pupa 
stages of Aleyrodes vaporariorum, the common green- 
house Aleyrodes of the tomato, and the same stages 
of the strawberry Aleyrodes. It also contains a thor- 
ough description of all the larval instars and of the 
pupa and adult stages of the strawberry Aleyrodes. 

'02.— F. R. Church has accepted the position as 
asaistant at the Hatch Experiment Station, recently 
vacated by H. M. Thompson. 

'02.— A. L. Dacy has resigned his position at 
Dentonia Park and will soon enter the employ of H. 
L. Frost and Co. Foresters and Entomologists, Boston. 



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108 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

THAT DEPENDS. 
When a pair of lips are upturned to your own. 

With no one to gossip about it, 
Do you pray for endurance to let them alone ? 

Well maybe you do — but I doubt it. 

When a sly little hand you're permitted to seize, 

With a velvety softness about ft, 
Do you think you can drop it with never a squeeze ? 

Well, maybe you do — but 1 doubt it. 

When a tapering waist is in reach of your arm, 

With a wonderful plumpness about it. 
Do you argue the point 'twixt the good and the harm ? 

Well, maybe you do— but I doubt it. 

And if by these tricks you should capture a heart, 

With a woman's sweetness about it. 
Will you guard it, and keep it, and act the good part ? 

Well, maybe you will— but I doubt it. 

— Yale Lit. 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MARCH 18, 1903 



NO. 10 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contributt. Communications should be addressed. College Signal, Amhbrst, Mass. Thb Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested It 
notify the Business Manager. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1903. Editor-in Chief. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN, 1903, Business Manager. 

HOWARD MORGAN WHITE, 1904, Assistant Business Manager. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1 903, College Notes. HENRY JAMES FRANKLIN, 1 <>03, Alumni Notes 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON, 1903, FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN, 1904 Athletics 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904. Department Notes. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904, Interco'legiate 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN, 1905. HERBERT HAROLD GOOJENOUGH. 1905 



Terms: ♦1.00 per gea r In adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside ef United States and Canada, 28c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot- Ball Association, 
College Senate. 
Reading-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E, Tottingham, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. H. Griffin, Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

E. B. Sneli, Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

R. H. Robertson, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
J. G. Cook, Manager. 
A. L. Peck, Manager. 
G. L. Barms. Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 
it,\ti»'.\« V MMjimiL NMRMt 



Edi-tori&ls. 



With the event of this issue of the College Signal 
the members of the Board of Editors in the class of 
1903 take their exit from the arena of college liter- 
ary life. Apropos of this time. we wish to extend our 
thanks for the support which we have received at the 
hands of the students and alumni and for the interest 
which they have shown in the paper during the past 
year. The circulation of the Signal is remarkably 
large when the comparatively small number of students 
and alumni is taken into consideration, and it is to the 
latter body, who are ever loyal to their college, that 
we are indebted for this circumstance. To the com- 
ing Board of Editors we wish all possible success. 
That •* success is the reward of toil " is never better 
demonstrated than in the editing of a college paper. 
However, although the task may not be an easy one, 
it is neither unprofitable nor necessarily unpleasant, 
and it Is our earnest hope that the pleasant features 
of their work may not be lost to those men in whose 
care the Signal is now to be placed. 



Since the first breeze of excitement over President 
Elliot's scheme of adopting a three years undergrad- 
uate course of study has somewhat subsided, educa- 
tors seem to ba considering the project more and 
more seriously and to some extent more favorably. 
Already the University of Pennsylvania as well as Har- 
vard has adopted the plan in her academic courses. 
Does this mean the complete readjustment of the 
college curriculums throughout the country ? Obvious- 
ly the three years course will hold out strong induce- 
ments to the average college student to whom time 
means money and who must make each day count. 
If these abridged courses with their lessened tuition 
fees and other expenses are to appeal strongly to the 
student and to cause a subsequent landslide in the 
direction of the institutions in which they are in vogue 
it is evident that other colleges must also rearrange 
their curriculums or take other means of self-defense. 
Does this then forebode a general adoption of the 
three years undergraduate course ? Whereas in the 
classical college this plan may meet with with success 
its adoption by scientific colleges would seem less 



no 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



in 







feasible or easy to bring about. Already specializa- 
tion in these institutions has been carried on until 
well nigh the entire four years are needed to even lay 
the ground work for a profession. For a thorough 
and accurate knowledge of a scientific subject a Mas- 
ters or a Doctor's degree is almost essential. In the 
shortening of the undergraduate course then, the grad- 
uate work would only be extended while its pursuit 
by the student of science would be made all the 
more necessary. That the specialization question is 
an important one and one which is worthy of the 
earnest consideration of modern educators there is no 
doubt. It would seem, however, that the danger, if 
there be such, lies in over specialization rather than in 
the reverse. 



severance are needed and are imperative in the fulfil- 
ment of its mission but the end will justify the means. 



The first step toward a successful press club has 
been taken, namely its organization. That this step 
has been in itself successful we have reason to believe 
for the fact that men have been placed at its head in 
whose ability we have confidence. It will indeed be 
a disappointment if these men allow the enterprise to 
fall short of the end for which it is intended. To es- 
tablish and maintain this club means work and plenty 
of it ; this is expected and the realization of this ex- 
expectation should not turn the members from their 
purpose. We want more men in this institution ! 
More good men. An isolated few have expressed 
contrary opinions but when approached they can give 
no valid reasons for such an expression. We must 
have more men ! and it is " up to " the students to 
secure them. Our college would never take kindly to 
the " college drummer " scheme of securing men, 
and as for filling exchanges full of flowery arguments In 
favor of Massachusetts we draw the line. But the 
Press Cub opens at least a partial solution of the 
problem. Authentic statements concerning rhe col- 
lege placed where preparatory school men may see 
them will carry with them an incentive for investiga- 
tion. Doubtless more young men of the state and 
of the United States, know of the existence of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College than was the case 
ten years ago ; the percentage is nevertheless need- 
lessly small. That it may be raised and that a cor- 
rect Interpretation of the college and its work may be 
set before the preparatory school student is the main 
underlying object of the Press Club. Energy and per- 



By the acceptance, by Professor Ralph E. Smith, 
of the chair of Plant Pathology in the University of 
California, this institution loses a man. who, since his 
entrance into the college as an undergraduate, has 
held the well earned respect and admiration of a wide 
circle of friends, and who as a professor has shown 
himself amply fitted for the work in which he is inter- 
ested. Professor Smith was born in Boston in 1874 
and entered this Institution in 1890, having previously 
fitted himself in the Newton high school. During his 
college career Mr. Smith showed high ability as a 
student and took an active part in athletics and class 
affairs. After taking his degree he returned to the 
college as an instructor in German and Botany and 
was elected assistant professor in the above subjects 
in 1895. Going abroad in 1898, Professor Smith 
pursued for a year a course of graduate work in vege- 
table pathology at the University of Munich and upon 
returning to this country continued work upon this 
subject in Harvard University, during the summers 
of 1899 and 1900. In the department of Plant 
Pathology Prof. Smith has become looked upon as an 
authority, his book on Botrytls and Sclerotuna having 
commanded the attention of Botanists. Particularly 
in the athletics of the college will Prof. Smith be 
missed. He has ever taken an active interest in this 
part of college life and for a number of years has 
acted as secretary and treasurer of the Athletic 
Association. Through his efforts in this capacity the 
alumni has come to the aid of the Association in an 
creditable manner. In his chosen field of work we 
believe the Professor has before him a brilliant and 
useful career, and in leaving this institution with which 
he has so long and so successfully been connected he 
takes with him our heartiest best wishes for the future. 



Prof. F. A. Hosmer, formerly president of Oahu 
college. Honolulu, gave a pleasing and instructive lec- 
rure in the chapel last Thursday evening on the sub- 
ject, '• The Hawaiian Islands and the Pacific." 
Prof. Hosmer's long residence in the islands and his 
experience as an educator, have brought him in touch 
with the life and conditions in Hawaii such as few 
men have enjoyed. 



The lecture was comprehensive in nature, at the 
same time abounding in humor and brilliancy of de- 
scription. Prof. Hosmer considered Hawaii from 
these stand-points.— the social, the educational and 
the industrial. As a rule the Hawaiian Is kind, amia- 
ble and generous to a fault, but when surveyed from 
the standpoint of veracity we find him woefully lack- 
ing. In common with all races living under the 
tropical sun. he shows little vitality and is lazy, thriftless 
and sensual. 

These tendencies, however.are being eliminated, to 
a certain degree by education and much is to be ex- 
pected. Already the public school has done much in 
this line.by bringing in foreign methods and influences. 
The percentage of illiteracy has been reduced to a 
lower standard than is found even in Massachusetts, a 
good showing for a country out of barbarism only a 
few decades. 

As a laborer the Hawaiian is of small value, his 
general tendency being to spend and not to earn. In 
spite of this, however, foreign capital is largely in- 
vested in sugar plantations, manufactories and lands, 
while to meet the demand for labor, Japanese coolies 
are imported. Standing, as Hawaii does, at the cross 
roads of the Pacific her commercial future is an as- 
sured fact and it only remains to see whether she will 
prove worthy of that charge. 



Outside baseball practice was begun on the campus 
last week, and every day now Capt. Ahearn puts his 
squad of men through batting and fielding prac- 
tice. It Is early yet to form a correct estimate of the 
strength of the nine that will represent us on the dia- 
mond this season, but there seems to be little danger 
that the mistakes of last year will be repeated, and 
with proper support from the student body it will be 
possible for a new and more successful chapter in the 
baseball history of the college to be begun. Four 
men are candidates for the pitcher's position. They 
are Cook. '03, Hunt. '05, and Spurr and Kennedy, 
'06. Capt. Ahearn, who caught part of the season 
last spring, will probably be behind the bat in most of 
this year's games, while there are three new men in 
Hubert, Taft and Harvey, either of whom may come 
to the front as the season progresses. First base, 
which seemed to be a hoodoo last year, is still open. 
Spurr. Harvey and Barrus being the candidates for the 



position. O'Hearn. last year's second baseman, will play 
that bag again this spring, and Hunt will make a good 
substitute when he is not being used in the box. 
Brooks. Martin, Kennedy and Lamson are the most 
promising candidates for the other Infield positions, 
and it will be a tight race between them for places on 
the team. Halligan is in his old position at center 
field, and there are six candidates for the other out- 
fields. They are Blake, '04, Walker. '05. and Webb. 
Rogers. Hastings and Martin, '06. 

As will be seen from the above the first few games 
will of necessity be experimental, and it will be some 
time before the final make-up of the team can be 
decided upon. Little can be judged of the batting 
strength of the team, but former experience would 
seem to show that too much practice cannot be in- 
sisted upon in that important department of the game. 
Much depends upon the work done by the baseball 
team this spring. For the past few years football has 
seemed to overshadow all other departments of othlet- 
ics here in collage. This is wrong, for we meet nearly 
the same colleges on the diamond as on the gridiron, 
and a long list of defeats on the former will go far to 
discount any prestige gained by the college in football. 
Capt. Ahearn is working hard to develop a strong 
team, the candidates are coming out well to practice, 
and with good support from the student body much 
may be done this season to establish the game of 
baseball on a surer footing here in college. 



PRESS CLUB. 

On the evening of March 3 an organization was 
formed under the name of the Massachusetts Agrecul- 
tuyal College Press Club. Officers were elected as 
follows : President. A. L. Peck '04 ; vice-president. F. 
D. Couden *04 ; recording secretary and treasurer. C. 
F. Ellwood ; corresponding secretary, H. M. White 
and a Board of Directors consisting of the above 
named officers together with J. G. Cook '03, R. R. 
Raymoth '04 and M. A. Blake '04. 

A constitution and By Laws were submitted and 
adopted as follows : 

CONSTITUTION OF THE M. A. C. PRESS 
CLUB. 

^RT. I. 

Sec. /. This organization shall be known as the 
Massachusetts Agricultural Gollege Press Club. 



112 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




Sec. 2. Its object shall be to secure a fuller and 
better representation of the college in such periodicals 
as shall be sanctioned by the club in a manner as is 
hereafter stated. 

Art. II. 

Sec. 1. The membership of the Club shall be 
limited to Seniors. Juniors aud Sophomores. Sopho- 
mores shall not be elegible until the second semister 
of the college year. 

Sec. 2. Membership may be obtained at any time 
by formal application to the secretary ; and the record- 
ing of such application by the secretary shall admit the 
applicant. 

Art. III. 

Sec. 1 . The officers shall consist of a President, 
Vice-president. Recording Secretary and Treasurer. 
Corresponding Secretary, a Board of Directors and an 
Editorial Board to be elected by the club. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the president to pre- 
side at all meetings of the club and to act as chairman 
of the Board of Directors and of the Editorial Board. 

Sec. 3. It shall be the duty of the vice-president 
to assume the duties of the president in the absence of 
the latter. 

Sec. 4. It shall be the duty of the corresponding 
secretary to direct all correspondence of the club. 

Sec. 5. The Board of Directors shall consist of the 
president, vice-president, recording secretary and treas- 
urer, corresponding secretary and three other mem- 
bers to be elected by the club. One of the members 
of the Board shall be the manager of such athletic 
teams as shall have a schedule in operation during the 
term of office of the board. 

Sec. 6. It shall be the duty of the Board of 
Directors to have a general oversight of the work of 
the Editorial Board and to sanction the reporting of 
college news in such papers as they shall select and to 
recommend to the club reporters to the several papers. 

Sec. 7 . The Editorial Board shall consist of mem- 
bers of the club who are elected as correspondents to 
such periodicals as are sanctioned by the club. 

By Laws. 

Sec. I. All officers of the club shall be elected by 
ballot. 

Sec. 2. Meetings of the club may be called at any 



time by the president or by a majority of the Board of 
Directors. 

Sec. 3. Officers shall be elected annually, said 
election to take place on the second Monday of the 
spring semester. 

Sec. 4. A quorum shall consist of ten men. 

Sec. 5. The club shall at all times use the full 
official name of the college or shall substitute there- 
fore only the name " Massachusetts". 

Sec. 6. All meetings of the club shall be conducted 
according to the rules incorporated in Reed's Manuel. 

Sec. 7. Any article or section of the above consti- 
tution in By Laws may be amended or omitted by a 
two-thirds vote of the club. 

\ M. H. West, 
Drafting Committee. VN. F. Monahan, 

) F. D. Couden. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



"3 



20 
20 
20 
30 
10 



OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHEMISTS. 

The U. S. Civil Service Commission advertises an 
examination to be held on the 24th of the present 
month for a position as chemist in the Division of 
Soils of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. The 
examination will consist of the subjects mentioned be- 
low and will be weighed as follows : 

Physical Chemistry, 

Soil Physics. 

Soil Chemistry, 

Analytical Methods, 

French or German, 

Age limit, 20 years or over. 
The salary for the successful applicant will be from 
$840 to $1200 per annum, with opportunities for ad- 
vancement as vacancies may occur. 

The examination in Massachusetts may be secured 
at Boston. Fitchburg, Greenfield, Lawrence. Spring- 
field or Worcester. The Department of Agriculture 
is frequently in need of Chemists in some of its sev- 
eral divisions, and salaries may be considered quite 
satisfactory. It seems to the writer, that some of the 
young men connected with this college, who are 
directly interested in chemistry, should make an 
effort to secure these positions as they are offered. 

J. B. Lindsey. 



Harvard and the University of Penn, are going to 
give a degree after a three years' course. 



LECTURES BEFORE THE HORTICULTURAL 
SEMINAR. 

Mr. Rawson of Arlington, who was invited by Prof. 
Waugh to speak before the Horticultural Seminar on 
the evening of Feb. 19, gave a very interesting talk 
on the subject of " Market Gardening" before forty or 
more Horticultural students. His talk was more from 
the business side of gardening than from the practical. 

Mr. Rawson has on his place in Arlington over 
seven acres of land covered with glass in which he 
grows mostly lettuce and cucumbers; counting on 
three crops of lettuce and one of cucumbers on the 
same soil each year. The soil is all sterilized in the 
houses before planting each crop. 

Mr. Rawson believes that market gardening under 
glass is only in its infancy and in spite of the fact that 
there are more in the business now than ever before, 
there are great opportunities for young men who are 
willing to work. He advises young men who con- 
templating going into the market gardening business 
not to waste time and money on hot beds and sashes, 
which are things of the past, but to construct one or 
more green-houses in localities not far from a large 
city where a good market is assured. 

On Friday evening, March 6. Mr. Stevens of New 
York spoke before the Hosticultural Seminar on the 
growing, packing and marketing of the apple crop. 
Mr. Stevtns laid great emphasis on the necessity of 
maintaining a high standard of fruit and of catering 
only to the best markets. In starting an orchard, he 
advised paying particular attention to proper selection 
and adaptability to soils and climatic conditions. All 
details of cultivation, picking and packing should be 
attended to with the greatest care. 

Mr. Stevens believes that the cooperative union of 
grower and salesman is highly profitable and predicts 
that within a few years it will be generally accepted. 



executive committee, R. W. Lyman, Wm. P. Birnle, 
George Leonard, John B. Minor and H. D. Hemen- 
way. 

It was voted at this meeting to extend sincere sym- 
pathies and good wishes to President Goodell during 
his illness and it was also voted that Professor Mills, 
acting as a delegate from the Faculty should at such 
times as occasions may call for convey the sense of 
the association, which is, that the practical study of 
Latin should be pursued at " Massachusetts." 



CONN. VALLEY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

At the annual meeting of the above association, 
held in Hartford, Feb. 20, the following officers were 
elected: President, R. W. Lyman. 71, of Northamp- 
ton; vice-presidents, William P. Birnie. 71, of 
Springfield and George Leonard, 71, of Springfield ; 
secretary. H. D. Hemenway, '95, of Hartford. Conn.; 
treasurer, John B. Minor, 73, of New Britain. Conn.; 



DEMAND FOR TRAINED AGRICULTURISTS. 

The following article was recently published in the 
New England Homestead, by Prof C. S. Phelps. 
M. A. C„ '85. It so fully voices my ideas in the 
matter that I trust it may be printed in a future issue 
of The Signal. It seems very strange that so few 
young men at our College realize the opportunities 
offered along this line, and I hope those who are in- 
terested will give the matter due consideration. 

J. B. Lindsey. 
" It seems to me that the letter of G. E. S. in the 
Homestead of January 24, stating some of the reasons 
for so few agricultural students, suggests a topic which 
needs consideration on the part of the college and of 
the students. Why do not more of the graduates of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College turn their 
attention to agriculture ? One prominent reason is 
lack of capital. 

Many of the students, on graduation, find them- 
selves without capital to start for themselves, and with 
little encouragement to return home. Such students 
naturally turn their attention to some occupation, per- 
haps teaching or business, for which their college 
training has fitted them. The supposed lack of op- 
portunities, or a conscious deficiency in practical 
knowledge, often deters them from entering this field. 
Now what are the facts as regards openings ? Within 
150 miles of New York city there are several hun- 
dred estates, owned by men of wealth, who from time 
to time are seeking expert managers. In fact such 
estates are found all over this country. 

In the past, such farms have been managed by 
practical men, of the old school of farmers, who were 
picked up near the estate. Such men are not prov- 
ing broad enough to meet the present requirements. 
Men of wealth are reallzlng.as never before, the value 



"4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 





of scientific training for those who are to manage 
their estates. This means the employment of an 
agricultural expert. No narrow specialist will do, for 
then several separate departments would need to be 
established, yet lacking an organizing head. 

Men with fine estates want managers who can 
make extensive improvements in land, breed and 
manage fancy cattle and poultry, raise fine fruits and 
vegetables, lay out grounds so as to gain pleasing 
landscape effects, and often to manage large forest 
areas with a view to their improvement either for 
beauty or utility. Several graduates of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College are filling such positions 
within 100 miles of New York city, and the salaries 
and opportunities they command are far in advance 
of those received by the majority of graduates of in- 
stitutes of technology, who have been no longer out 
of college. 

A conscious lack of practical knowledge on the 
part of the agricultural college graduate is often the 
main thing which deters him from entering the field 
of expert farm managers. This is in part his fault 
and in part is due to deficiencies in the college. The 
man who expects to become a botanist or an entomol- 
ogist spends one or two years in special study at the 
college after graduation. Why should not the man 
who wishes to become an expert farm superintendent 
do the same, and why should not the college afford 
him the best possible opportunities for this training ? 

I believe the college could do no better work than 
to offer special opportunities for graduates to remain 
as student assistants, who should spend perhaps six 
months in each of two or three departments. In addi- 
tion to their practical work, courses of reading and 
practical lines of experimenting should be laid out for 
them by heads of departments. Visits should be 
made to the farms of successful practical specialists, 
and crops and varieties best suited to different soils 
and localities should be studied. 

I believe the time is soon to come when men of 
wealth will be taking up agriculture on a large scale 
as a purely business project." 

The athletic meets arranged by the Williams man- 
ager are as follows: Syracuse, May 16 ; N. E. I. A. 
A. at Worcester, May 22, 23 and the Mott Haven 
games, May 30. 



"5 



BAND CONCERTS. 

The College band, assisted by C. M. Kinney of 
Northampton, organist, rendered its first concert at 
the North Amherst church Friday evening, Feb. 27. 
Owing to other attractions there was unfortunately but 
a small audience. However, the programme was ren- 
dered with enthusiasm and much praise was tendered 
the men. 



Last Friday evening the band gave its second con- 
cert at the Belchertown Town Hall. Much improve- 
ment was noticable over the previous concert and 
each number, especially the solos, was persistently 
encored. After the concert, dancing was Indulged in 
until the early hours of the morning, the music being 
furnished by a local orchestra. 

Following is the programme of the concert : 
March, ' Blaze Away," Holzmann 

Serenade. Brass quartett, -'Summer's Night," Stutton 

Vocal solo with Band accomp't, " Down in the Deep," Patrie 

Mr. Staples. 
Concert Schottische, " Charming Ellaline," Hall 

Banjo solo, Selected 

Mr. Walker. 
Medley overture, " Sporting Life." Beyer 

Cornet solo. Band accomp't. " Prismatic Polka." Rollinson 

Mr. West. 
March, "W. M. B." Moon 

Baritone solo, Band accomp't, " In the Sacramento Valley." 

Beyer 
Mr. Tottingham. 

Overture, " The Jolly Students," Feeazzi 
March with whistled chorus, Our Director, Bigelow 
Star Spangled Banner. 
.». 

IN MEMORY OF 

EDWARD THOMAS ES1P. 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 1904, 

DECEASED. 

Whereas, It has pleased our Allwise Father, in his infinite 

love to take from us our Brother and. 

Whereas. We deeply mourn his loss, and sympathize with 
his bereaved family in this hour of greatest trial ; be it there- 
fore, 

Resoleed, That we, members of the College Shakespearean 
Club, mourning his early death, feeling deeply that we have 
lost a faithful and sincere Brother, and grieving for the be- 
reaved family, do extend to them our deepest sympathy, and 
be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
family of our departed Brother, that a copy be published in 
the next issue of the College Signal and Amherst Record, 
and that a copy be filed in the archives of the College 
Shakespearean Club. 

A. W. Gilbert, 1 Committee 

J. W. Gregg. for the 

John J. Gardner, ) Fraternity. 



AN EPISODE IN RAILROADING. 

One night in the early spring of 78. in the small 
station of Dalton, before his desk in a half dreamy con- 
dition, sat the midnight operator waiting patiently for 
the coming of the Northern Pacific express, after which 
his night's work was done. Slowly the old clock hang- 
ing in the corner, ticked off the seconds, and still more 
slowly the minutes rolled by ; yet no sign of the apprach- 
ing train. Finally, as the clock struck one, three long 
whistles broke upon the midnight air; uttering a sigh 
of relief and jumping from his chair, lantern in hand, 
he ran out just in time to see the great head light 
come shooting around the bend, in the extreme dark- 
ness, nearly a quarter of a mile up the track. This 
being the general watering station of all through trains, 
the brakes were applied and grating upon the wheels 
a screeching sound they soon performed their work and 
the panting monster came to a standstill in front of the 
station. The nearly exhausted supply was replenished 
here, before undertaking the run over the broad expanse 
of track between there and Denver. 

The tanks filled, the throttle opened, and with a 
puffing and snorting and wheels creaking, the long line 
of cars began slowly to move, gaining speed at every 
foot. A moment more and all was darkness around 
the small station, while in the distance could be heard 
but faintly now, the rumbling sound of the swiftly 
departing train. Just as the throttle was opened, a 
watchful observer might have seen, darting from the 
dark corner of the station, a slender figure which 
quickly disappeared near the engine. The form was 
that of a boy about fifteen years old, of medium height, 
dressed in rather shabby looking clothes. A blue shirt 
open at the neck' an old coat, a pair of paints evidently 
meant for one of much larger proportions, and a rusty 
looking pair of shoes constituted his outfit. Springing 
upon the platform of the first car, he carefully climbed 
over the rear end of the coal-car aud concealed him- 
self tn the darkest corner of the empty space. From 
this position he commanded a full view of the cab and 
at the same time ran little risk of being detected. 

In the cab. at his post sat the engineer, his left hand 
upon the throttle, and bending eagerly forward, appar- 
ently watching for signals and occasionally uttering a 
word to his companion. The latter, sweat dripping 
from his face covered with coal dust, having a thin 
shirt to cover his muscular arms, was kept busy watch- 



ing the steam gage and feeding large shovelfuls of coal 
into the Immense fire box. For a moment the great 
door was swung open, letting forth a dazzling light then 
all was darkness except a stream of sparks issuing from 
the smokestack and the rays pouring their searching 
eyes from the powerful headlight. 

Behind, in the elegantly furnished cars slept, or 
enjoyed themselves, the passengers many In number, 
little dreaming of the terrific speed at which they were 
being practically hurled over the ground, through mile 
after mile of track. Hardly one of them realized the 
fact that in one left hand was held practically all 
of the lives aboad. That the missing of a signal or 
the failure to interpret Its meaning meant death to many 
and serious injury to others. In spite of these would 
be troublesome thoughts, they slept or sat as contented 
as though safely lodged in their own homes. 

Speeding onward through the darkness at the terrific 
speed of fifty miles an hour, lunging from side to side 
at every slight curve, and seeming only ambitious to 
leap from its steel bonds, the heavy midnight monster 
flew onward to its destination passing signals by the 
score. Just as the train bore around the sharp curve 
before striking the level stretch of track lying between 
there and the narrow track of timber, the eagle eye of 
the man at the throttle saw in the distance, directly 
ahead, a glaring sheet of flame which illuminated the 
sky for many miles around. This being his first trip In 
that section, and being himself somewhat of a coward, 
as we shall see, he thought no longer of those Innocent 
lives for whose safety he was responsible. Instead, he 
thought better of risking his own life by a daring leap 
than by plunging as it seemed into the mass of 
flames where escape seemed impossible. Pulling 
the cord twice in quick succession, as a warning of 
approaching danger, and shutting the throttle, he gave 
a mad leap into the darkness. Seeing his companion 
going, the fireman, not thinking twice, immediately 
leaped after him leaving the engine apparently to take 
care of itself. 

You remember seeing, at the beginning of this 
episode may miles back, a boy smuggle himself into 
the coal In hopes of securingthereby a means of reach- 
ing his far off home in safety. Down in a corner, 
half asleep, dreaming probably of home, and his one 
cosy bed sat this same boy ; now he was suddenly 
awakened by two quick, sharp shrieks of tha escaping 







i6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



steam. Jumping up instantly he was just in time to 
see the fireman leap from the cab. while ahead he saw 
the broad extent of flame upon either side of the track. 
Quick to grasp the situation, having travelled many 
miles with his father (an engineer) and knowing this 
action of the country to perfection, he saw that the 
heavy train was about to plunge headlong into a forest 
fire. What was to be done ! To attempt to stop the 
train would be folly as it could not be accomplished 
until well within the bounds of the fire. In this case 
the cars must certainly be burned and everything would 
be lost. On the other hand to continue speed, and 
attempt passing through the half mile or more of burn- 
ing timber would be to run the risk of encountering 
trees fallen across the track. However without hesitat- 
ing he sprang into the the deserted cab determined to 
pursue the only course wherein lay a possible chance 
of escape. 

Pulling the throttle out to its full extent, dropping 
the storm flaps, and opening the water gauge was the 
work of but a few seconds. Grasping the shovel, he 
filled the fire box and the engine fairly bounded along, 
while he stood at his post managing the machine with 
the skill of a master hand, all the while praying that 
God might be with him and the unfortunates during the 
perilous journey. Only a minute or so, with good 
fortune, and the danger might be passed. During this 
while the occupants of the train were rushing back and 
forth within trying to ascertain what had happened. 
Many thought the day of reckoning had surely come 
while others with clearer consciences were satisfied to 
await consequences. Seconds seemed as minutes, 
while the flames threw a terrible heat upon the glass 
which became covered with soot. The heat within 
the car was worse than a July day in the tropics, and 
many fainted because of the closeness of the air. 
Soon the train emerged from the oven and the would-be 
runaway engine sped on wildly through the darkness, 
but under the control of one understanding its 
mechanism. The blistered cars soon cooled and 
opened windows soon revived the occupants. 

The remainder of this ever memorable run being 
comparatively short was accomplished in less than an 
hour. At four o'clock of that spring morning No. 7 
pulled into the yards at Denver, a sorrowful looking 
sight. As she drew up in front of the large depot and 
the brakes had brought the wheels to a stand still, the 



passengers flocked from their births and full of eager 
questions pressed around the engine. Imagine their 
surprise, when, instead of a full grown man down 
stepped the boy, from the cab covered with sweat and 
weak as a rag. At first some were hardly able to 
believe that this self same person had brought them 
throught such a perilous ride. It was true nevertheless, 
he had saved the day and proud he might rightly feel, 
He was taken at once, fed and cared for, and that day 
by special order he was admitted into the general 
manager's office, commended for his bravery and 
liberally rewarded. To-day after years of experience 
he is occupying the most important office in the 
employ of the company. 

As for the two deserters as they might well be called, 
for such they certainly were : one received a serious 
wound afterwards proving fatal, the other has been 
neither seen nor heard from since. Probably escaping 
injury by some miracle, he realized the disgrace he 
had brought upon his head by deserting his post and 
retired to another part of the country. T, '05. 



117 



THE RECAPTURE OF THE CAPTIVE. 

•• I wonder where Ireland is ? " asked Wiley Crocker 
as he threw down the letter he had been reading and 
glanced at the other two members of the Freshmen 
banquet committee who had just entered. 

" Oh Dick's always late," growled Ed Horton, as 
he threw himself on the corner-seat and started to 
light up. " Go on with the business he'll be here later. 
I'm dead tired and I haven't looked at my Calculus 
yet." 

" Sure, start it up Wiley, I don't believe Ireland is 
coming. I saw him headed for the depot with a suit 
case less than on hour ago," volunteered Burt Garri- 
son, the other member of the committee from the 
depths of a Morris chair. 

" Well, it's just as you fellows say," replied Crocker, 
•■ there isn't much to do any way. How did you 
make out with Col. Tait about that special car Ed ? .' 

" Oh, he said he could arrange that all right. He'll 
have the car at the corner at eight and everybody 
wants to be sure and be on time, for they say the 
Sophs are wise." 

" That's right too," chimed in Horton, •' Will 
Bowers was speaking to me about it this morning and 
he said he was dead sure the Sophs, were on to us. 



You want to watch out Wiley, old man, they'll kidnap 
you sure if you give them half a chance." -Don't 
you worry about me. little Willie is quite able to take 
c?re of himself. But I won't run any chances. I'm 
going to start out right after dinner and skate down 
the canal af far as Chatham and walk over to Dover. 
I've an uncle living there and I'll spend the afternoon 
with him and run into Morristown on the electrics in 
the evening." 

•' That's a good scheme Crocker, you can't be too 
careful for we want to be sure we have our toast-mas- 
ter with us. Well so long, old man. beware of Deli- 
lah," responded Garrison as the two started off 
together. 

'■ Good-night. Don't forget to tell the fellows to 
be on time as I probably won't have a chance to see 
them." 

After the fellows had gone, Crocker picked up his 
Chemistry and started to study, but it was no use, his 
mind was too much occupied with thoughts of the 
morrow and the jokes he hoped to spring the follow- 
ing evening. So after a few attempts he threw down 
his book and retired for the night. 

Goose-eggs came Crocker's way faster than ten- 
spots the next morning, and the sound of the noon 
bell was a welcome one. 

After dinner he donned his sweater and throwing 
his skates over his sholder. started off. 

He was just turning into the road that lead to the 
to the canal when he saw coming up another side 
street, two sophomores, Joe Hoyt and Harry Rundle. 
I'm up against it thought Crocker, quickening his 
pace and seeming not to notice them. -'Hello 
Crocker." yelled out Hoyt. •■ going skating ? " •• Sure." 
responded Crocker without pausing. - Well don't be 
in such a deuced hurry, old sport, we're going along 
with you." 

" Any particular place you're bound for ? " continued 
Hoyt, as he caught up. 

" Why-er-yes. I was going to skate down as far as 
Chatham and then walk over to my uncle's for the 
night." 

" Down to Chatham, hey, well I guess we might as 
well go along in that direction too. It's easier skat- 
ing with the wind than against it," responded Hoyt, as 
he finished buckling on his skates. 

They skated on in silence for a while. Crocker 



slightly ahead and hoping every minute they would 
turn back. But the minutes stretched into an hour, 
and still they showed no sign of returning. 

Suddenly he heard Rundle say : - We must be 
pretty near there, aren't we Joe?" 

' Yes it's just around the bend. Keep your eye 
on him," answered Hoyt. 

" Keep your eye on him I " that must mean me, 
thought Crocker as the awful words fell on his ear.' 
So he had been trapped ! What was to be done ? 
A thousand wild and impracticable schemes found 
themselves in hurried succession.only to be dismissed 
as objections and difficulties sprang up as hurriedly to 
condemn each in turn. To fight was impossible : to 
attempt to escape was equally so and pleading would 
only cause him to be laughed at. 

' Well, old boy. I guess we might as well stop 
here." said Hoyt laying his hand on Crocker's 
shoulder. 

They had just rounded a bend disclosing a closed 
carriage waiting on the bridge that crossed the canal 
at this point. 

" Stop here ! " replied Crocker in surprise 

- What for?" 

- Oh. that'll be all right. Were on to it. Sorry 
to inconvenience you when you wanted to see your 
uncle, but I guess you had better come with us. Late 
suppers are bad for your health," responded Hoyt 
laughing, " there is no use kicking, we're two to one 
and the driver understands his business." 

Crocker realized the uselessness of kicking all too 
well, but decided to try and bluff it out. So he re- 
plied, " I really don't know what you fellows are driv- 
inn at, but if there is a ride in it, I'm with you." 

" That's right. Wiley, act sensible and we'll have a 
good time out of it yet." replied Rundle, as the three 
seated themselves and began taking off their skates. 
Presently all three were in the carriage and Hoyt 
shouted. •• To the Gaylord House, driver " as he 
slammed the door. 

A wave of joy passed over Crocker as these casual 
words made clear to him their plans. He was to be 
taken a captive to the very hotel where the supper 
was to be. Already his memory was fleeing back to 
the speech he had prepared, and he was going over 
in his imagination the joke they would have on the 
Sophs the next day. 



n8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



119 




The hack presently drew up in front of the hotel 
and they all went in. 

•• Might as well register. 1 suppose, they will never 
think of looking for us here," suggested Rundle, as he 
picked up the pen. 

•• Sure, go ahead," agreed Hoyt. 
Ye Gods of luck, this is just my chance, thought 
Crocker, as he fumbled in his pocket for a card on 
which he scribbled when his turn came to register : 
" Am class toastmaster captured by Sophs, tell fel- 
lows." This he slipped between the leaves with a V 
when the clerk was looking. Then he turned quickly 
and walked sedately away with his captors. 

The late afternoon and early evening was pleasantly 
spent in playing cards, and as each side was confident 
they had succeeded in outwitting the other, they were 
all in the jolliest of moods. Rundle had just sug- 
gested that Crocker should recite his speech for their 
benefit, when a loud knock resounded on the door. 
•• Come in," yelled Hoyt as he opened the door. 
•• Hello Hoyt" shouts Will Bowers as he bounds 
in the room followed by half a score other Freshmen. 
«• Glad to see you've been taking such good care of 
our toastmrster, but I guess we can relieve you now." 
The Sophs were too much surprised to offer any 
resistance, if indeed such a thing were possible, and 
the Freshmen bore their toastmaster off to the ban- 
quet hall in triumph. 

•• He laughs best, who laughs last." Hill, '05. 



Mar. 18. 



Mar. 19.— 



Mar. 20.— 



Mar. 21 



Mer. 23.- 



BASE BALL SCHEDULE. 

The following schedule for the base ball season has 
been submitted by manager Cook. 
April 13, Amherst on Campus. 

18, Open, game pending. 

21, Tufts on Campus. 

24, Bates on Campus. 

29, Open. 

6, Bowdoin at Brunswick. 

7, Open, game pending. 

8, Bates at Lewiston. 

9, Colby at Waterville. 
20, Williams at Willlamstown. 
27. Trinity at Hartford. 

3. Open, game pending. 



May 



June 



12, Colby on Campus. 

13. Wesleyan at Middletown. 



Mar. 24 
Mar. 26 

Mar. 27 
Mar. 30 



CALENDAR. 

Quinlan & Wall's Minstrels in Holyoke 
Opera House.— Smith College Glee club 
at Academy of Music. 
Regular meeting of College Y. M. C. A. 
at 7 p. m. Topic: " Pure thoughts, pure 
words, pure deeds." 

- Liberty Bells " at Holyoke Opera House. 
Otis Skinner in " Lazarre," at Academy 

of Music. 

Competition closes for College Signal 
Board. — " The Burgamaster " at the 
Academy of Music. 

Election of new College Signal Board. 
Course Payton's Stock Co. at Holyoke 
Opera House. Matinees daily after Mon- 
day.— The Aubrey Stock Co. at Academy 
of Music. 

— Meeting of Press Club at 7 p. m. 

—Meeting of Y. M. C. A. Topic : The 
The risen life, Christ's, Ours. 

— Seminar meeting at 7-45 p. m. 

— •• A Gambler's Daughter " in the Empire 
Theater. 



AMERICAN COLLEGE FRATERNITIES. 

AN estimate. 
The college fraternities whose organization and 
methods are so little known and often misrepresented 
to the general public, is one of the most popular and 
well established organizations in the college world, so 
that now. there is hardly an institution of any note 
where it has not yet found access. 

The reasons for this general acceptance by such a 
large body of young men, are to be found in the causes 
and objects of its constitution, for not only is it an 
organization which stands for the purely social devel- 
opment of the individual, but it also seeks to stimulate 
the mental energies and develop the general character 
of its different members. And then, again, the wide 
scope of its influence brings in the idea of a broader 
fellowship whereby men from different institutions may 
intermingle and thereby realize that, not only in name 
but by the common bond of fellowship are they united. 
While each lodge or branch organization is thus 
drawn together in name and in fellowship, there are, 
however, certain customs and practices which tend to 



greatly strengthen this bond. The first, is in regards 
to the system of naming. There are many methods 
in doing this, but the most common is that employed 
by the Greek letter societies. By this method the 
different lodges are denoted in their order of estab- 
lishment by certain Greek letters, as for instance, the 
primary chapter being known as the Alpha chapter, etc. , 
while if the number of lodges exceeds the number of 
letters in the alphabet, the letters are combined either 
by chance, (as Delta Zeta) or by systematic combina- 
tion.(as Alpha Alpha, Alpha Beta.or Gamma Gamma.) 

The custom of wearing a pin or badge denoting to 
which fraternity the owner is a member is universal. 
Of these pins or badges there are three kinds. First, 
the name or symbol of the fraternity may be engraved 
on a sheet or plate of gold or it may. by another 
method, be done by a monogram of the letters com- 
prising the name. The third way, and one which is 
used by some by the class fraternities in the large col- 
leges is by representing the character of the society by 
a symbol, as for Instance, a skull, harp or key. 

Fraternity colors, along with different modifications 
or combinations for each of the chapters, are also a 
means of telling the chapter, college. and fraternity to 
which a person belongs. Another common practice 
and one which must naturally arise, considering the 
nature of the organization, is that of bringing repre- 
sentatives from each of the several chapters together 
at conventions and reunions. Here.after a discussion 
of problems of Interest to all, they join usually in a 
banquet. This custom is a most beneficial one. for 
it enables men to become acquainted, and to further 
the general interests of the fraternity. Year-books, 
catalogues and general publications are maintained 
by the larger and more affluant fraternities and 
conduce in a marked degree to solidity in the general 
organizations. Fraternity songs and customs are 
instruments in arousing the pride and interests of its 
members. 

Turning now to the general history and growth of 
these different fraternities, we find that they are an 
outgrowth of the old debating club or literary soci- 
ety so prevalent in our colleges one hundred to one 
hundred and fifty years ago. Many of the old forms 
and principles were incorporated Into their constitu- 
tions and bye-laws, but the general administration 
differed radically. The first Greek letter secret soci- 



ety to be founded in the United Sta»es was estab- 
lished at William and Mary college in 1776. The 
manner of its origin is unknown, there being several 
conflicting stories concerning it, one of which is that 
it was started by Thomas Jefferson, but in reality the 
true character and method of its formation are in 
doubt. Two years later, chapters were founded at 
Yale and Harvard called respectively the " Alpha of 
Conn " and the " Alpha of Massachusetts," the parent 
chapter being known as the "Alpha of Virginnia." 
The war however put an end to the Virginia chapter 
and left the two above named as the only representa- 
tives of the system. In 1781. the" Alpha of New 
Hampshire" was founded at Dartmouth, and the soci- 
ety grew until in 1826 when it discontinued its 
methods of secrecy, and has since developed into a 
non secret honorary society basing the requirements 
of admission on scholarship and ability. It is how- 
ever known only in classical colleges. Its counter- 
part in scientific colleges long known as the Tau Beta 
Phi. To belong to either of these organizations is an 
honor eagerly sought for. 

The years 1824 to 1827 witnessed a powerful 
impulse in the formation of secret fraternities, when 
the Kappa Alpha, Delta Phi. and Sigma Phi were 
founded at Union college, the last two being on the 
latter date. These three in their manner of organiz- 
ation and mode of government laid a foundation which 
all later fraternities have builded on. 

From this time on, numerous other fraternities 
were formed, while the old ones continued to grow In 
number and importance, so that when the civil war 
broke out there were no less than twenty-three differ- 
ent fraternities existing. The war however, was disas- 
trous to the fraternities and much of their strength 
was lost through disintergration and weakness. 

After the war however, things took a decided turn 
for thebetter.and the impetus thus gained has not less- 
ened, but rather increased, so that now. the great 
national fraternities number on their roll from twenty 
to sixty chapters, averaging several thousand members. 
Chief among these is the Delta Kappa Epsllon (known 
as the Dekes) with a chapter roll of forty and a total 
membership of 14.000. 

So much then as regards the national fraternities, 
and now let us take up the other two forms of frater- 
nal organizations namely, the local and class frater- 



i. 

■ 



I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



121 




1 20 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



nities. The local fraternity is that which has 
one chapter, but while it lacks that characteristic, 
its influence is often as great and many times, greater, 
than the national fraternity in that college, due per- 
haps to longer establishment and peculiar conditions. 
In it are included Greek letter name fraternities which 
from either weakness or shortness of time have not 
established separate chapters. 

The class fraternities are in a more strict sense 
local, and under it exist separate organizations of the 
four classes in college. Some of these, however, have 
branch chapters in other institutions, but they are. as 
a rule local.and more secret. In method of organiz- 
ation and work they do not comflict with the national 
or general fraternities, but are purely honorary socie- 
ties to which certain leading spirits of the class belong. 
Among the most notable examples of this type is the 
Scroll and Key, and Skull and Bones at Yale. Jun- 
iors, Sophomores and Freshmen are organized in like 
manner and the effect is to break up the strong college 
fraternity bonds and to form a more democratic 
and united whole. 

Has, then, the fraternity a right to continue? One 
might almost ask if this great record is justified by its 
results in asking that question. Yet numerous 
objections have been urged against it. and of which 
we will consider a few. The argument is raised that 
it is a •■ secret " organization and to some people that 
very circumstance condemns it. But why ? Does it 
by its results tend to lower the standard of scholar- 
ship, or indeed any of the things striven for in college? 
Does it form an obstacle to college good ? It does 
none of those, but rather through its constitution it 
seeks to attain those ends. It is " secret " to the 
world, just so far as it sits behind closed doors. 

It tends to degrade the student ! Why so, does not 
he find out the world sometime ? Why then cannot 
he find it out in college where his friends care to help 
him. and then if he fall, it is not so hard and due rather 
to his inclinations not the influences of fraternity life. 
Can such men as Pres. Roosevelt, Bisnop Potter.Gar- 
field and Cleveland, be the product of " degrading 
" fraternities? 

The matter of expense then comes in. which is 
not so great as people imagine. In many cases the 
value of a fraternity house is much to the student, and 
then his fees and dues are those required to establish 



and make a system which by its past has proven its 
right to existance. 

In conclusion we find that the record of the Ameri- 
can college fraternity has been an honorable one, and 
one which by its efforts has done much for the greatest 
all around development of its members, and from that 
standpoint we say let it continue. If our likes or dis- 
likes move us to criticize, let us remember that the 
system is large and the results are also large. 

F. F. H.. '05. 



A BIT OF HISTORIC NEW ENGLAND. 

To a person interested in the history of the Indians 
of Eastern Massachusetts, the country lying about 
Noon Hill is worthy of note. 

Besides being the home of quite a large number of 
Indians at an earlier date it was visited in the winter 
of 1676 by King Philip and a band of nearly five hun- 
dred warriors who succeeded in burning the greater 
part of Medfield. 

One Sunday morning in February as the people 
came out for worship in the churches King Philip and 
his dusky followers were seen upon Noon Hill. Prepa- 
rations were made to receive an attack ; three hun- 
dred soldiers who had arrived for its defense were 
stationed about the town but the Indians were waiting 
for the early morning hours in which to commence 
the destruction. 

During the night they spread out over the town, 
skulking behind walls and fences and at the break of 
day set on fire nearly fifty buildings. Some of the 
inhabitants escaped to places of safety while others 
were shot down and burned in the ruins of their 
homes. 

After the destruction of the town the Indians crossed 
the river to the summit of the nearest hill overlook- 
ing the ruins and held a savage feast. King Philip, 
on a black horse rode wildly about exulting in the 
devastation he had wrought. 

A little to the eastward of the center of the town as 
It is to-day stands an old dwelling house which some- 
how escaped the torch of the Indians in the winter of 
1676. It is of an old style of structure not found any- 
where else in America to-day. being 24 feet in length 
by 14^ feet in breadth and 12 feet from the eaves to 
the top of the roof, making a very steep pitch, thus its 
name: " The Old Peak House." In consideration of 



its being one of the oldest buildings in. New England 
to-day, it is in quite good condition, a family still 
making it their home. 

The hill on which the Indians held their feast is 
also marked to-day by a group of trees supposed to 
have been standing at that time, whence comes the 
name, •• King; Philip's Trees." They are rare speci- 
mens of a variety of hornbeam, sometimes called 
umbrella tree and stand in a somewhat irregular 
circle. 

Another place of interest lies about three miles to 
the southwest of Noon Hill. It is the site of a 
former Indian village which was located on an expan- 
sive slope to the south. Although almost entirely 
wooded over to-day; its outlines are especially well 
preserved. 

The whole area is bounded by what to the ordi- 
nary observer would seem to be a long trench thrown 
up by some former troop of soldiers and somewhat 
worn down by the processes of time. The Indians 
seeking to protect their homes from invasion erected 
a palisade around their village and dirt was thrown 
against the outside to make the structure more firm. 
The wooden posts have long since rotted away leaving 
the trench and bank of earth seen to-day and the 
former is fast being filled with leaves. 

Toward the northwestern side is a break in the 
trench and bank of earth. This was probably a 
former gateway through which the red men used to 
pass. As we walk through toward what was at one 
time the center of the town we can seem to make out 
a pathway where the trees seem to be less numerous. 
The trampling of former warriors returning from the 
hunt or from the battle has prevented nature from 
closing the gateway with a living palisade of trees. 

From the center of the area another path can be 
traced out leading down the slope to the south follow- 
ing this to the base we come to three springs a few 
rods apart. 

Here the Indians found their water supply. No 
trees grow near any one of the springs indicating how 
the earth must have been hardened by moccasined 
feet. The cool waters of the springs flow into a 
brook not far away and walking along its bank we 
come to a point where it suddenly widens. Here the 
Indian launched his canoe and glided swiftly down to 
the river which winds through the meadows on its 
way to the sea. 



The presence of old beaver dams shows that the 
Indian had selected a rich as well as a beautiful place 
for a home. Is it a wonder then that he would not 
give up such a home to the white man without a 
struggle ? 

When hunting along this slope in the fall or fishing 
on the bank of the river in summer, perhaps going to 
the springs for a cool drink, I picture to myself this 
old Indian town with its wigwams on the slope and 
wonder what mysteries and traditions lie buried there. 

B., '04. 



Collect N°**S- 

Spring recess, March 28 to April 2. 

The Senior class has formed a debating club. 

There is some talk of establishing a signal corps at 
the college. 

Morton Cambell, '00, has been spending a few 
days about college. 

Harvey, '03, is gaining ground slowly and will 
soon be convalescent. 

The Short Winter course ends to-day. Twenty-five 
men are to receive certificates. 

Lamson, '03, who has been sick at home the past 
two weeks is again about college. 

The Senior class expects to make a trip to the 
Springfield arsenal in the near future, 

It has been rumored that Prof. Herman Babson 
intends to study German in Europe next year. 

While we rejoice at the good fortune of Prof. R. 
E. Smith, we are all sorry that he is going to leave us. 

P. W. Brooks and G. L. Barrus. '03, spent last 
week inspecting cold storage plants In Boston and 
vicinity. 

The baseball men showed up very well in the prac- 
tice game last Saturday. The prospects of a good 
team are very bright. 

Prof. F. A. Waugh and G. Drew attended the 
meeting of the Worcester County Horti ;uitural society 
held at Worcester, last Thursday. 

The Short Winter Course hold their parting ban- 
quet at the dining hall to-night. The announcement 
of the prize-winners will be made at that time. 






122 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Prof. F. A. Waugh has completed a design for a 
waiting station to be built at the car line on the 
Botanic walk. The design shows a very pretty rustic 
building. 

The Thompson House Kajets will not be broken up 
after all. They are still to be found at their old 
quarters. A great deal of interest is being shown as 
to who will be elected to fill the vacancy in their ranks. 
The number is limited to six. 

Lyman, '05, has been placed in charge of the ambu- 
lance corps. Equipment will be pieced in the hands 
of Mr. Lyman within a few days and excellent work 
is promised. The services of an efficient corp will be 
invaluable during the athletic games — football 
particularly. 

The Senior class have elected a prom, committee 
as follows: W. E. Allen, G. L. Barrus, J. G. Cook, 
D. W. Brooks, C. P. Halligan, G. H. Jones, N. F. 
Monahan, E. G. Prouty, R. H. Robertson. C. S. Tink- 
ham and W. V. Tower. Committee on class cup: 
W. E. Allen. E. G. Proulx and W. V. Tower. Com- 
mittee on class banquet : P. W. Brooks, J. G. 
Cook, and N. F, Monahan. 



Spring Clothes. 



Just the sorts that young men will appreciate. 
There's a collection here that absolutely cannot 
be found elsewhere in Western New England. 
Will you come and see It? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 



Haynes & Co., 



Springpikld, 



Always Reliable. 



Mass. 




PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 

New York 

Central 

Lines 



DAILY SERVICE. 



THROUGH COACHES 



BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



SLEEPING CARS 



DINING CARS 



EXPRESS 


TRAIN 


SERVICE 




TO AND FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER 








AS FOLLOWS: 






RKA 


I» DOWN. 




Rl Al 


OP. 


9.0fi AM 


. ti.02 P.M. 


!▼. Amherst 


ar. 9.06 a.m. 


8.36 P.M. 


9.!W " 


6.45 " 


ar. Palmer 


lv.8.90 " 


7.51 <• 


10.00 " 


fi.58 " 


lv. Pnlmer 


ar.736 " 


7.36 <• 


ION) " 


8.01 " 


ar. Worcester 


lv.ti.25 " 


6.10 '« 


11.50 " 


9.03 " 


ar. Boston 


lv. 5.00 " 


5.00 " 



To ALBANY, 
To BUFFALO, 
To CHICAGO, 
To CINCINNATI, 
To DETROIT, 
To ST. LOUIS, 



Through the 
Famous . . . 



9 Trains 

8 Trains 

7 Trains 

3 Trains 

5 Trains 

3 Trains 



Berkshire 

mils . . . 

AND THE 

fllbanp Gateway, 

Which ii always Open. 



For further Information, timetables, etc., call on ticket agents or address, A. S. HANSON, G. P. A., Boston, Mass. 



Alu 



mm. 



' 90 - — H. D. Haskins attended the meeting of the 
New England Exberiment Station chemists held in 
New York on March 13. 

'91. — The marriage is announced of Walter Cary 
Paige to Miss Eudora Spencer. The ceremony took 
place on Wednesday, Feb. 25. in the Methodist Epis- 
copal church at Fadaga, ind. They will make their 
home at Louisville, Ky. 

'94.— A. H. Kirkland is engaged this winter by the 
Massachusetts society for promoting Agriculture, and 
is giving public lectures; illustrated by the stereopti- 
con, upon the common insect pests of shade trees, 
the spraying outfits and the results from spraying. 
He has over 100 lantern slides, many of them pho- 
tographed and colored directly from nature. They 
have made a hit wherever Mr'. Kirkland has shown 
them. 

'95. — We are happy to announce that a son has 
arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Lane of 
New Brunswick, N.J. 

' 95 - — R. A. Cooley, in the Canadian Entomologist 
for February, published a description of the Diaspid- 
genus Phenacaspis. The species nyssae is suggested 
as the genus type. 

'95. — F. C. Tobey, now of Stockbridge, visited the 
college recently. 

'96.— The marriage is announced of A, S. Kinney 
to Miss Jean Belden. on Wednesday. Feb. 18, at 
Pittsfield. At home after April 15, 10 Park St., 
South Hadley. 

'99.— On Wednesday, March 4, in the Unitarian 
church at Templeton, W. E. Hinds was married to 
Miss Edith Goddard Gray. The wedding was an 
elaborate one and the number of those who attended 
was large. F. H. Turner. '99. was best man. D. 
A. Beaman, '99. A. C. Monahan. '00, and S. L 
Smith, '02, were among the ushers. 

'00. — M. F. Campbell was in town recently. 

'02.— A. L. Dacy, 28 Ward St., South Boston. 



&he HEIR 

to the FARM 



!/ 



Will malts the old form pay 
If he farms the farm in the 
modem way. 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

Gaujiht by Matt. 

A thorouiih and practical course. 
under the direct charge or Wtn I* 
Brooks, Ph. I),. (Massachusetts A- 
"cultural College). Our court* is 
hast d on Brooks' Agrieulturi 
treats of soils, plants, tillage, draln- 
sge.irrigstion, manures, fertilisation, 
crop rotation an.l everything per- 
taining to money-making on the 
farm, Texi books (3 volumes, xno 
pages, 300 illustrations) free to stu- 
dents. Send tor 3d page book de- 
scriluiig course in full. 

Home 

Correspondence 
Schools, 

Sprinfjfitld. Majj. 
other t'ourw: Hoftiiipiui, Shorthand 
Penmanship, Typewriting Normal 
vuurne flt» for teach vr*! mi, ate 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGER, 

200 Broadway, New York. 



Club and College Pin* ami Kings. 
Cold and Silver Medals. 
itlaniMii.is, WatcheH, Jewelry. 



"UP TO THE MINUTE" 



IN 



Coach Kennedy of the Yale crew recommends the 
Connecticut River below Springfield for the Yale- 
Harvard boat races instead of the Thames. 



MEN'S FINE SHOES, 
The Northampton Shoe Co, 



88 Main St., 



No« i Hampton, Mass. 






I2 4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

The faculty of Cornell has added a course in auto- 
mobile mechanics to the curriculum. 

Amherst college is about to change their system of 
three terms per year to the system in vogue at many 
colleges namely of two semesters. 

A good opportunity for two young men 
to learn how to 

RAISE AND SELL VEGETABLES 

so that eaeh acre tilled may be made to 
return from $500 to $1500. 



Write or call on H. M. HOWARD, 

281 Fuller St., West Newton, Mass. 



IIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIJIIIUIIII 

' Hinds &• Noble, Publishers, 3/ W. 15th St, 
If, Y. City, will tend you any ofth ese boohs tub*- , 
feci to approval. Enclose this advert isetnent^ j 

Song* of 4I«thoColle«» ... $1.60 
■«»(• of the Kutoro OollegM • • 1>» 

Sosgi of the WetUrn College* ■ . XM 

New Song* for Olee Club* • * ^ .60 

New Song* for M*l* Quertette* • .*» 

^m flongi for Chnrch Qntrtette* 
(MS That Bav Taken PrtaM • 
ttr» Piece* Th»t Will T*ke Pri*** 
Piece* for Ettry Oceaajon • • - 

• Mfnat* DeclamaUoiwi for College nt 
8-Mlnot* Reading* for College OlrU 
Bow to Attract and Hold an Audience 
Palmer' • New Parliamentary Manual 
Pro* and Cone. (Complete Debal**) 
I Commenceisent Parte (Oratlona t Eaeaje, eMJ l.SO 
J Uunntooa'* New Pialogoe* aad PUj» M9 , 

!ililiiiiiiiiiiniiiii!iiiuiil 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 



1* 

ft 

100 
1.00 

1.00 
.» 

1.60 





Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone fending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
Invention Is probahly patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patent* 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Miinn * Co. receive 
tptcUU notice, without c harg e. In the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms, »3 a 
year ; four months, 11. Sold by all newsdealers. 

. & Co. 86,Bro - dw New York 

Branch Office. «J6 V Bt., Washington. D. C. 



Write a Note 

to Johnson 



when you ■want a book, a picture, .some stationery 
or anything else worth having. 




Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AND ART DEALER, 

313-315 Main St., - - Springfield, Mass. 



HENRY A_)___v_<_., 

f_c_.:i£Is__oist. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, . - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 



FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND HRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLK 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Mettilllc Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting anil Springfield rifles. 
Similar and night call I responded to at resilience, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIII. 



AMHERST, MASS., APRIL 8, 1903 



NO. 11 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute Communications should be addressed Cu*..*, . 

sent to all subscribers until its discontinuanc. is ordered and arrears aTwkl SuSL . h ^ " A » H «^, Mass. Th B S.onal will be 

notify th. Business Manager. ' p " d - Subscrib « rs *h° do not receive their paper regularly are requested tc 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904. Editor-in Chief 

HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. 1904. Business Manager. 
FAYETTE DICKINSON ronnp M R !^ A ^ WBANALLER ' ^5. Assistant Business Manager. 

ART™ L^PEcT, SFELXZ?"*"* "" ^^ ^Z^ ^^^ ' **' ^ «*"■ 

ERNEST ADNA BACK. I 904, Department Notes. aP r am n A m A ^ L ™ AN ' ' 9 ° 5, C ° l ^ e No,es - 

HERBERT HARO LD GOODENOUGH: 1 9 05, Athletics. ^p" war'e PEACES, ITot 

Jl^r^jL^p^e^,^^ stutc8 — ■ . m _____ 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate, 
Readir.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

A. W. Gilbert. Pres. Athletic Association. 

C. H. Griffin, Manager. Base-Bali Association, 

E. B. Snell, Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Four Index 

R. H. Robertson, Sec. Fraternity Conference 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec, 
J. G. Cook, Manager. 
R. L. Allen. Manager. 
G. L. Barrus. Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office it Amherst. 
tMnartw * iiwmm , norma. 



Ed!+br!cvls. 



We are sorry to have the Signal come out late this 
issue, but delays will occur and it. is due to no fault 
of the Board that it is so. Rather than let it remain 
over one whole week we thought fit to publish it the 
latter part of this week and rely upon the reader's 
goodness to be as lenient with us as possible. 



Since Radium has been reduced to such a ridic- 
ulously low price, perhaps it will be possible for us to 
learn something of this new and important factor in 
chemical life. The American Inventor of recent 
date stated that an English chemist has suc- 
ceeded In obtaining a quantity and in reducing the 
Price from $1,000,000 a pound to $900,000; but as 
he has but one hundred milligrams on hand, we 
would urge our College authorities to hasten before 
'he supply has all vanished. 



Spring with Its mud is here again ; and once more 
th e fact is impressed on our minds that a good dry 



walk makes life a great deal more pleasant than does 
a wet muddy one. Perhaps the muddiest place is 
on Pleasant street between the end of the college 
walk and the walk in front of Gilbert's. Here, on a 
rainy day, it is only by walking on the rails of the 
street railroad that one keeps out of the mud. Some 
kind of a permanent walk leading to the Dining Hall 
is also needed. The Botanic walk is very bad at 
times and could be greatly Improved. For about half 
the length of Lincoln avenue there is no sidewalk; 
and. as a number of students room on that street and 
many more use that route to go down town, a suitable 
footpath on that street would greatly accommodate 
the students. We aiso think that there has been 
ample time, since the completion of tlie new heating 
plant, for lights to have been placed along the college 
walks. We would like to see our old friend " Chain 
Lightning " get a move on and get the lights in place 
as soon as possible. 



Now that the Press Club has been organized, let 
us see to it that work is accomplished. There is 






126 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



I 



splendid opportunity within our grasp now to keep 
Massachusetts constantly in the public mind. Let 
there be sufficient enthusiasm aroused in the work 
that it may progress with increasing interest. And 
who should not be enthusiastic in the interests of his 
Alma Mater ? Spring athletics will soon take some 
definite form and it is essential that Massachusetts 
shall appear before the public in as favorable light as 
possible from the beginning to the end of the season. 



parent lack of appreciation of the eternal fitness of 
things, for editors are not always the wisest of folk, 
and often have the misfortune to have this " great- 
ness^) thrust upon them." and must seek their best 
way out of it. We shall be only too happy to receive 
suggestions from time to time ; but above all give us 
encouragement and inspiration by your hearty support 
in the work ; for the powers that be and have been 
know that though the soil is good, yet we have but 
little time to sow and cultivate. 



The department of landscape gardening is doing 
its best to encourage its members to better and more 
thorough work. If each student will take hold and at- 
tempt the work as planned, there is every reason to 
believe that he will be well fitted to pursue it as a life 
work, and be capable of fulfilling the duties devolving 
upon the profession with credit to himself and to his col- 
lege. The offer made on another page by one inter- 
ested in the work, should serve as a stimulus to each 
member of the class, not so much for the purpose of 
obtaining the prize— although this is worth striving 

for as for the opportunity for original research and 

study and to have the result of the labor come before 
the eyes of men who have made the profession 
famous, and who stand ready to give assistance when 
called upon. 



Beginning's are always interesting in that they in- 
dicate a trend of action to be pursued at some future 
time. Though this can scarcely be called a begin- 
ning, since the policy and purpose of the Signal have 
been so carefully planned and carried out in the past, 
yet it is as a beginning in real editorial work that we 
take up the pen and present to your kind indulgence 
(or merciless criticism) this first number of the new 
board. It is the desire of the present board to main- 
tain the same standard of excellence achieved by our 
worthy predecessors, but we realize the responsibility 
resting upon us and to accomplish the work we ask 
the hearty co-operation of the student body and 
alumni in the undertaking. Give expression to your 
views and opinions on matters pertaining to college 
life and activity through the medium of your college 
paper, for which purpose it was established. Do not 
let a judgment of the intellectual character of the Col- 
lege rest entirely upon the work of the board of editors. 
And do not condemn too harshly when there is an ap- 



THE PINK EYE. 

Apropos of the above disease which has been so 
rampant at college lately, we came across a timely 
article on the subject in the Agricultural Epitomist, and 
reprint a part for the benefit of those afflicted and those 
likely to become so. We believe that if the advice is 
carefully followed the contagion will disappear. 

•• Influenza .known as pink eye.ls a very common and 
a very dangerous disease. It is well to remember that 
it Is a contagious disease and to keep other horses 
away from any animal giving evidence of having it. 
The characteristics of the disease are elevation of the 
temperature of the body to three or four, and some- 
time six or seven degrees above normal, staggering 
gait, resulting from weakness, swelling of the eyelids, 
with a very decided congestion of the mucous mem- 
brane of the nose and eyes ; swelling of the legs, 
especially the hind ones ; the latter is a very prominent 
feature. The appetite is almost certain to be more or 
less impaired. The treatment Is very simple when 
uncomplicated, and care should be taken to prevent 
complications. Keep the animal comfortably warm 
without impairing the ventilation of the stable. This 
means that in cold weather good blankets should be 
used. Supply the animals with plenty of pure water to 
drink. Change the foods often and give frequently 
just what the animal will entirely consume. This kind 
of care will almost universally suffice in mild cases. 
Special care should be taken to keep the healthy 
horses from those afflicted with pink eye. as they would 
otherwise be almost certain to contract the disease. 
Burn a good quantity of brimstone inside the building. 
This process should be repeated once or twice a week. 
Among the causes which originate this dangerous 
disease, are overfeeding.underfeeding.overworking. food 
of poor quality, or of unsuitable character, defective 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



127 



teeth, old age, disordered digestive organs, the debility 
following many cases of acute diseases such as dis- 
temper, pneumonia parasites, founder and other like 
causes. Rest is paramount in cases of extreme 
debility. But if the animal can bear exercise care 
should be taken to give it ; but always guarding against 
going beyond its strength. In no case should it reach 
to comparative exhaustion. These directions being 
well observed, a cure can usually be hoped for unless 
the attack be a very severe one." 



SOME FEATURES OF THE LOUISIANA 
PURCHASE EXPOSITION. 

The World's Fair that is to be held In St. Louis in 
1904, while not on such a large plan as the World's 
Fair in 1892, will outclass it in many respects. It 
does not seem possible that such advancements could 
be made along the lines of scientific discoveries, in ten 
years, yet one of the noticeable features of the Louisi- 
ana Purchase Exposition, will be the rapid strides in 
inventions, and the more thorough knowledge of the 
uses of science, that will be shown, as compared with 
the World's Fair at Chicago. 

Electricity has been put under control to such an 
extent, that the increase of the lines of application of 
it has been over twenty per cent, during the past ten 
years. Naturally, the Palace of Electricity will have 
an Important position In the plans of the grounds. 
Instead of the domes and towers, that are usually 
found on exposition architecture, these are replaced 
by groups of statuary, allegorical of electricity, 
mounted on pedestals raised above the cornice line. 
On the eastern side of the building are sculptural 
groups, which embody the spirit properties of electricity : 
power, speed, light, and heat. 

On another side, will be statues of men eminent in 
electrical science, such as, Tota, Ampere, Ohm. 
Faraday, and Franklin. It need hardly be said, that 
the building, as well as the whole exposition, will be 
lighted by electrical effects, as yet unsurpassed. 
Electricity will be harnessed to perform work which 
would be almost impossible to accomplish. 

The refrigerating exhibit is one that will create a 
general interest. The refrigerating arts building will 
contain all the different devices for cold storage, and 
will require a boiler plant of three thousand horse 



features of this department will be to cool the theaters, 
restaurants, and hotels, on the grounds; also to furnish 
refrigeration to operate the largest Ice skating rink In 
the world. The exhibit will also show apparatus for 
making Ice and it is the intention to have an -old 
fashioned" snow storm, at certain hours of the day. 

Another feature of the exposition will be the Olympic 
Games. These games were revived in 1 896, and were 
held in Athens. In 1900 they were held in Paris, and 
next year are to be held on the Exposition grounds, at 
St. Louis. All the ancient customs regarding these 
games will be observed, and It will be an interesting 
contest to watch. The main features will be, wrestling, 
jumping, throwing the discus, foot races, horse races, 
and perhaps the most exciting of all. chariot races. 

All the countries of the world will be represented by 
buildings and exhibits ; while every state of the Union 
will have a share. Although the plans for New Eng- 
land's share, are not fully completed, she will without 
a doubt have an exhibit to be proud of. 

C. F. E. 



THE COURSE OF TRUE LOVE. 

jean's diary. 
Jan. 1. Well! here's New Year's day come and 
gone and such a great old time. Wrote some letters 
this morning and received some New Year's cards. 
Went downtown in the afternoon, but this evening — 
what a time ! Perfectly lovely one at Mae's party. 
All the old friends and some new ones. Among them 
I met a fellow from Fredoria, a freshman. Every- 
thing was his college this and his college that. and. O 
Heavens, he asked to call, and I had to say, » Yes." 

Frank's diary. 

Jan. I. Greatest day of my life. Out in the 
morning and afternoon on my new colt. Alex was 
with me on his. Went to Miss Joy's party in the 
evening and had a swell time. Met a peachy girl 
from Winona, a Junior. Beats all my old crushes by 
a long shot. Wonder what she thinks of me. 
jean's diary, 

Feb. 20. Home for four days with every minute 
engaged. Been shopping driving most all day. Was 
planning to spend the evening with Kate here at home 
making fudge when who should call but that Mr. 
Hamilton (the Lord knows how he knew I was at 



power to operate the machinery. One of the main j home). Had to send Kate upstairs with the folks 



128 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



and entertain that stick till 10-30. Called on me 
twice during the Christmas vacation and now this 
time. I'll have to freeze him somehow. 
Frank's diary. 
Feb. 20. Down here in Buffalo for a couple of 
days of days of recreation. Rode all around and saw 
the fellows. Saw Miss Goodwin from a distance and 
decided to drop around there and see if I couldn't 
spend as delightful an evening as the previous ones 
were. She seems to be looking better every time I 
see her. I had a very pleasant time at her home 
this evening. The three hours seemed like so many 
minutes. I'm going to ask her for her picture the 
next time I see her. 

Mar. 29. Now for two week's vacation. Lots of 
things on the string ; driving, going to the theatre , 
parties, and dances (or at least one). Just accepted 
Mr. Hamilton's invitation to the Country club dance 
the 7th. Having a new dress made. Frank — I 
mean Mr. Hamilton — says he favors blue. 

Mar. 31. Home to-morrow and a high time for 
two weeks. Just got Jean's acceptance to my invi- 
tation for the 7th. (Say! but that name sounds nice.) 
Hope she'll look as swell as I can see her in my 
mind. 

April 8. O, what a magnificent time. Its all 1 
can think of. Got home at three in the morning. 
His dancing is simply divine even if he is a little 
swelled headed. He's pretty nice though. Never 
noticed his magnificent build till last night. I guess I 
like Jack better than when 1 first met him. I never 
will forget that dance as long as I live. 

April 8. The dance has occurred, and I'm just 
coming to after 5 or 6 hour's sleep. First-class time. 
Swellest girl on the floor. Fellows looked at her 
pretty sharply and hinted around that they would like 
two dances if possible, but I considered it impossible. 
Great success all around. 

July 29. Been packing all day to be ready to 
leave for the shore to-morrow. Ought to have a fine 
time. Big hotel and fine people, and Frank is going 
to be there for two weeks. I don't know what to 
make of him ; sometimes he seems to like me very 
much and at others he doesn't seem to care for me 
at all. (I think though, I'll find out soon, especially 
as he is going to take me to ride.) I rather like him. 
July 29. Pretty hot in this blooming city ; glad I 



haven't got to stay here long. Start for York in a 
couple of days. Will stay there with Alex 10 days or 
so and then I guess I'll go down where Jean is, since 
I said I would. I guess she is struck on me ail right ; 
she seems to be from the way she acts. Its funny 
how soon girls will fall in love every time a fellow pays 
aa girl any attention, I wish some fellow would alien- 
ate her affection so that I could drop her, but such is- 
Fate. 

Sept. 7. 0, this is the most lonesome place I ever 
was in. Nothing to do. Men in plenty, but all sticks 
who want to argue this or that. I don't know what I 
ever shall do now that Frank is gone. It is two days 
since he went, and it seems two weeks. O dear, I 
know he don't care for me any more. 

Sept. 6. Back in the city again for a few days be- 
fore college opens. Never was so glad to clear out 
of a place as I was to leave Jean. How any fellow 
can get struck on such a soft specimen I can't see. 
Glad I'm not sentimental. Its all love with her when 
she once gets acquainted. Bah ! give me some- 
body more sensible. 

Jan. 10. It is just five months since I've heard or 
seen anything of Frank Hamilton. Don't care much, 
though he was awful nice. He isn't the only man 
living, and I'd like to tell him so, too. 

Jan. 15. I have been wondering lately how Jean 
has gotten along without me. I am kind of sorry for 
her. Have just sent my prom, invitation to Everett 
Russell's sister— she is a corker. 1 wonder if it's be- 
cause I m in love that I don't sleep any better. 

A. N. S., '05. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



129 



Obs?rd&tions^C onc ' u S' on S 

The Observer is feeling sorry for himself and his 
mates, very, very angry at the faculty and trustees of 
the college, and terribly envious of the short course 
classes. The reason of the Observer's overworked 
think organ may be found in a single sentence on page 
nine of the Boston Journal for Sunday, March 29. 
The writer of that page says "While at college " the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College by the way. " Mrs. 
Folsom took the special course which required three 
months of hard study and practical work to learn the 
science of agriculture which others require years to 
learn." The Journal adds that among the studies 
taken up and completed by this wonderful woman in 



eleven weeks were agriculture, hcrticulture, veteri- 
nary, chemistry, market gardening, and dairying. 

Is it true, can it be a fact, is it possible, may it not 
be a mistake, must we believe, are you certain Mr. 
Boston Journal reporter and Mrs. Short Course Co-ed 
that this is absolutely true? Are our minds so dull that 
we must take four years to learn that which can be 
mastered in eleven short weeks ? To be sure we 
are but men, but there are Co-eds too in the four 
years course (worse luck) and there have been men 
who have graduated in short course classes. Is it 
then the faculty who have fooled us into believing 
that we must remain all these years in college to 
learn that which can be taught if necessary in less 
than one-tenth the time ? It is time then that a 
committee of investigation were selected from the 
taxpayers of the state to ask the faculty why, and to 
call a halt to this wasteful expenditure of the people's 
money. It is time for us, the students, to rise and 
demand more hours and less pay, I mean less time and 
less money spent on our education. It is time in fact 
for the millennium, when a four years' college course 
can be completed in three times that many weeks. 
Wake up, Mr. Boston Journal reporter and Mrs. 
Short Course Co-ed, the earth still moves around the 
sun. and the day of miracles and freaks has passed. 

Mrs. Folsom, the Journal man says, is especially 
interested in animals of all kinds. She has made a 
specialty in her studies of stock, especially of the 
fancy breeds. One of her adventures at college she 
tells the Journal man with great gusto. It seems she 
went to chapel one morning and found a green goat 
occupying the pulpit. Now the Observer went to 
chapel that morning — it was St. Patrick's Day — and 
he has always supposed that the animal in the pulpit 
on that particular morning was a ram. A ram, you 
know, is a male sheep, and he and a goat of the same 
sex only resemble each other in the fact that both 
have horns and green parts and neither gives milk. 
The Observer is much taken back by the fact that he 
mistakes a goat for a sheep after spending the greater 
part of three years in an agricultural college. There 
It a chance however that he may have been right 
after all, for he finds that many others believed as he 
did about the matter, and in fact he has come across 
very little sentiment in favor of the goat theory. 
Here is a chance for some amatuer detective work of 



high order. The green paint must have worn off by 
this time, and it may be possible to decide conclu- 
sively as to the exact nature of the much talked of 
beast. 

***** 

And next year, in all probability, there will be 
scores of the women of Massachusetts who, enthused 
with the accounts of Mrs. Co-ed's success as a prize- 
winner and a judge of fancy stock, will flock to us by 
companies, with the idea that they can complete a 
college course in the same short time as did the 
" beauteous and accomplished, modest, unassuming, 
interesting, animal loving, prize dog, cat, and chicken 
owning, daughter of one of the most prosperous, intel- 
ligent, office-holding farmers, of the famed, long set- 
tled, Colonial town of Revere in the great Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts." Shrink ye " Sons of Old 
Massachusetts." The time is soon coming when ye 
will not be so much as a dirty deuce in a new deck, 
and when a Co-ed, and a Short Course Co-ed at that, 
will be the most famous among the alumni of your 
beloved Alma Mater. To arms, ye Co-eds of the 
class of 1905. Will ye acknowledge that the honor 
of being the first of your sex to graduate from the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College has passed from 
you to a mere Short-Horn ? Demand ye, that ye be 
interviewed by Boston reporters. Make the hills re- 
sound with your cries for snap-shots of yourselves and 
whatsoever animals ye have tamed. Strike, and let 
thine honor bi avenged by a nine column richly illus- 
trated article in the Salvation Army War-Cry. Entitle 
the article " Bringing the Green Goat Back to the 
Fold " and thus be assured that your claims of being 
the second worst bugbear of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College are completely vindicated. -'On 
Atair! On Rigel ! What Antares! " They are sing- 
ing of the Short-Horn. Let 'em sing, but just sing a 
little louder so that in our next issue we may say with 
Ben Hur : " We have overthrown the proud, soho 
boss. Rest." 



We 'ave seen both men and women take a course at M. A. C. 

And some of 'em was freaks and some was not. 
The Short Course Institution brings a smile to you and me, 

An' the Co-eds is a curse inspirin' lot. 
Bnt when you mix the two breeds up, an' the thing that you 
produce. 






1 






i3« 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'3i 



Is a bloomin' female, aged thirty-two. 
Th' Observer's kick is comin', 'e don't care a tailor's goose, 
What 'e says, nor 'ow 'e puts 'is view. 

So 'ere to you, Mrs. Co-ed. at you're 'ome in old Revere, 
We'd much rather Mrs. Co'ed, you livin' there than 'ere. 
We gives you your certifikit an' we'd gladly give you t»o. 
If we was dead-sure certain that we'd 'ear no more of you. 

So 'eres to you Boston Journal, an' your shrewd reporter 

man 
Th' Observer gives the latter all the pity that 'e can. 
He too has nawthin' better to write about to-day. 
Than a bloomin' Short Course Co-ed, an 'is 'air is turnin' 

gray- ^_ 

^ATHLETICS. 

Although the material for the baseball team seems 
to be better than in many seasons, still the condition 
of the diamond makes hard and consistent practice 
impossible. Many promises have been made to the 
effect that the baseball field Is to be put into shape. 
As things now are, the grounds are like golf links, 
with its bunkers. We would like to remind the ath- 
letic committee that the diamond will not be needed 
after commencement. 

Another serious drawback in the welfare of the 
team, is the fact that there has lately been no hot 
water for the use of the men after practice. Cold 
water, while it may be very invigorating, is hardly fit 
for lame muscles and bruises. It does not seem as if 
there could be any good reason why hot water cannot 
be had at all times. 

We speak of these conditions, detrimental to the 
success of the team that they may be righted. We 
blame no one. No one seems to realize how serious 
is the present situation, for the team plays its first 
games with Amherst within a week, followed shortly 
by several games on the campus. 

The poor success of our baseball teams in the past 
has been caused by the lack of support from the un- 
dergraduates. Let every man this season make a 
special effort, at least, to support the team financially. 
The victories it gains reflects glory on us, its defeats 
when unsupported, are to our shame. 

•♦ 

Harvard's track team may lose two good men 
through the illness of Rust, the quarter-mller, and 
Robinson, the shot-putter. The former is crippled 
with a strained tendon In his knee and Robinson is 111 
with appendicitis. 



April 



THEATRE ATTRCTIONS. 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 

10, DeWolf Hopper, in " Mr. Pickwick." 

15. " Way Down East." 
17, " San Toy." 

30, Mrs. Fiske in " Mary of Magdala." 

HOLYOKE OPERA HOUSE. 

13, Rob't Edson in" Soldiers of Fortune." 

14, Morgan & Hoyt's moving pictures. 

16. Ward & Vokes. 

22. Mildred Holland in " The Lily and the 
Prince." 



THE JUNIOR BANQUET. 

The banquet tendered the class of 1 904 by the 
class of 1906 was held In the Ten Eyck Hotel, Al- 
bany, March 27. 

This event marked another success for the class. 
The trip through the Berkshires to Albany, which 
was enlivened by music and song, was only too soon 
ended. The latter part of the afternoon and the early 
enening were spent in investigating the wonders of the 
capltol. In viewing the city, and in attending the 
theatre. 

At eleven, the class gathered In Ten Eyck's beau- 
tiful banquet hall, and sat down to a pretty and sub- 
stantial banquet. When Raymoth tired of enthus- 
ing over the gay actress whom he had seen at the 
theatre. Toastmaster F. D. Couden. president of '04, 
bade the class, " Oil up the rusty hinges of thy wit " 
and became the very Impersonation of wit and humor. 
G. E. O'Hearn. much to the regret of the class, was 
not present to respond to the first toast, " Loyal Sons 
of Old Massachusetts ; " however, a toast was drunk 
to the success of the College. 

A. L. Peck next spoke in glowing terms of " The 
Class that Pays for the Feed," and said that while. 
■• A Freshman is only a Freshman," the class of 1906 
is the best class which has entered Massachusetts 
since the entrance of 1904. Owing to the absence 
of E. A. Blake, who was to speak upon " A Memory 
of '02," a toast was drunk to those who have proved 
by their example that " Friendship is an excellent 
thing, and good fellows well worth remembering." 
•• Face crops and Fertilizers " naturally fell to R.R- 
I Raymoth. It Is to be feared, however, that Prof. 



Brooks would not have given him a ten spot for his 
treatment of the subject. The crops which the 
speaker said that he preferred to raise were those 
which " tickle a woman's fancy and sometimes withal 
her features." As to the fertilizer to be applied — 
R. R. R.'s blushes gave that away. Zack Hubert on 
" Our Latest Acquisition," convulsed the class with 
laughter over his jokes and stories of southern life. 
We didn't know he had been " in jail " before. 

From the letter in the '04 Index, addressed to 
•• Dear Ted," it was no surprise to the class when C. 
H. Griffin rose in response to the toast " The 'Wim- 
min' Folk." Griffin has seen the country from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific, and from his varied experience 
warned the class to beware of those who try to rule 
the wearer of the bi-furcate garment. Yet, in recog- 
nition of the fact that there is- a soft spot in every 
man's heart, he proposed a toast to the girl each man 
loved best. S. B. Haskell came near losing his pull 
with Prof. Brooks in dealing with the " College Hor- 
ribles." To Haskell, nothing could be more horrible 
than the co-eds. He has lost his pull with them now. 

The last toast of the evening, " The Class that 
Eats," was feelingly and well handled by J W. Gregg. 
"Since there is no one else to praise you, speak for 
thyself, tho' sparingly and without vanity." Gregg 
spoke for the class ; he gave its history, recounted 
with pride its successful career, referred to " The 
ships that have passed " and ended with an exhorta- 
tion for the future. Never before had the class felt 
the bonds of friendship so strongly. It was a not-to- 
be-forgotten occasion. 

The class closed the evening's festivities with songs 
and yells — yells for '04, and yells for •* Old Massa- 
chusetts. 

ANNOUNCEMENT. 

A friend of Massachusetts Agricultural College who 
is especially interested in the landscape gardening 
work, but who wishes to have his name withheld, has 
offered a prize of $25 in gold to be competed for by 
the students in landscape gardening this year. 

The competition is to be in the form of an essay or 
report on the scenic features and landscape possibili- 
ties of the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
campus, including the portions known as the Horticul- 
tural Woods, the Clark Hill, and the Massachusetts 



Garden, but not including farm or garden lands. All 
natural scenic values should be carefully weighed and 
the best methods of enhancing them pointed out. 
Any natural or artificial defects in the landscape 
should be indicated, with the means of mitigating 
them. General and specific suggestions for the im- 
provement of the campus should be made. While 
artistic considerations are to be given principal 
emphasis, engineering problems should not be 
neglected. 

These reports must be submitted to Professor 
Waugh on June 5, 1903. They will be examined by 
a suitable committee, to be named hereafter, and the 
prize will be awarded at Commencement, 1903. 

WHAT OF THE VALEDICTORIANS ? 

An editorial on the above appeared in the Boston 
Transcript recently. The thought is so pertinent to 
the time that we print It entire. 

Criticism of the practical value of a college educa- 
tion has taken two forms. It has either been a 
wholesale charge against college training per se, or it 
has been directed particularly against the " grinds," 
the high stand men who gain Phi Beta Kappa, and 
are elected valedictorians. "What of the valedicto- 
rian ? " has been the cynical query. Those disposed 
to undervalue college training, and especially strict 
attention to scholarship as over against culture, will 
do well to weigh the evidence of statistics gathered 
by Professor E. G. Dexter of the University of Illinois, 
and published in the March Popular Science Monthly, 
For purposes of comparison and for reasons perfectly 
obvious to those who know the merits of works of 
reference. Professor Dexter has taken the handbook 
and general address catalogue of Phi Beta Kappa and 
•• Who's Who." issued in 1900. as the books record- 
ing most completely and accurately the graduates of 
colleges who have attained high scholarship and the 
men in American public life who may fairly be said to 
have succeeded. Broadly speaking, the standards of 
scholarship necessary to gain standing in the many 
chapters of Phi Beta Kappa do not vary as much as 
might be supposed. To be named In " Who's Who," 
one must have done something worth while in one of 
many callings recognized as typical by Its editors ; and 
while there are not a few successful men in the 
country whose names are not In this compilation, 









\5> 



THE COM. I'll *' WONAL 



• •• 



u(l, ter P*sfe*or Dealer* *nv*ti. i» tanar taat CtM^ 
ccatibofcual 

Oil of $122 IMef ftaiaalaaof Hrerttgr oo*h*H - 
•to attarw* Pal Beta Kappa f*V«. 461 Kavatoai 
*A«d in - Wie-a Was '-.?<eaart/ato-| pc 

v*ftcell*4 parcafttfa of tvtaf ft ii ai ltt of 
MM toufcadcea latcd to •• VM Waa 
Uon£y2l poeeaat. In*)jrn«f«< Ik* taaeitftoaa 
vt>aa« rtccnto •tr* utah/atd «aa tha porccriaft d 

Kgnadt CM*. aaa lhay «<WMW'<< I ha 
tn-olkr ooilaft* %<lh wUiMf i»aJ. Pre 

aer Dealer 44*0 ahowi :;! vhfltfew* binned 
*a#tai to ri *m aarabtr of mod tiirfca* from JIYeav* 
cc**f*avt» IN tie*!*! l» Phi U«u Kappa, tha 
■mp ftthf b«4*f warty 16 per cat!. c< the daaa 
iKoltoHla • Who'tWho" »Sjv l%al nearly 40 pal 
C*ftf c< the hfh-fraio eaW tf a. to** ar* lis: 

Mlimif, Profc4**r Datm h*» *a?pkrr*t**<l tha 
rr»<»*i wmi wth rsrec irttJri amJf»H >:< 'to 

■ ■ ^ • J h_ *M 



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»34 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






V 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



135 



of Naturalists at their recent annual meeting in 
Washington, entitled " Observations upon the Morph- 
ology of a Species of Osmimda from the Cretaceous 
Formation and its Relation to Existing Species." It 
was fully illustrated by lantern slides. 

'83.— J. B. Lindsey, chief of the Dep't of Foods 
and Feeding, Hatch Expt Station, has recently left 
town on account of ill health. 

•90.— Dr. P. E. Felt. State Entomologist of New 
York, spoke before a recent meeting of the Mass. 
Fruit Growers' Association in Worcester on the treat- 
ment of the San Jose* scale. 

•92. We are glad to announce the birth of a son, 

Charles Elmer, to Mr. and Mrs. Jewell E. Knight. 
They are at present residing in Rahuri. India. 

•93 p, e. Felt, who for some time has been 

prominent in horticultural circles, was recently elected 
secretary of the Mass. Fruit Growers' Afsociation. 

•95 r. A. Cooley. Entomologist of the Montana 

Experiment Station, has recently published a bulletin 
on the Codling moth. 



Spring Clothes. 



Just the sorts that young men will appreciate. 
There's a collection here that absolutely cannot 
be found elsewhere in Western New England. 
Will you come and see it? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 



Springfield, 



Mass. 




PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 

New York 

Central 

Lines 



DAILY SERVICE. 



To ALBANY, 
To BUFFALO, 
To CHICAGO, 
To CINCINNATI, 
To DETROIT, 
To ST. LOUIS, 



9 Trains 
8 Trains 
7 Trains 
3 Trains 
5 Trains 
3 Trains 



THROUOH COACHES 

BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



SLEEPING CARS 



DININO CARS 



EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 

TO AND FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER, 

AS FOLLOWS: 



RKAI) DOW*. 

9.06 A.M. 6.02 P.M. 

9.50 " 6.45 " 
10.00 " 6.58 " 
10.50 " 8.01 " 
11.50 " 90S " 



It. Amherst 
iir. Palmer 
lv. Palmer 
ar. Worcester 
ar. Boston 



BEAD UP. 

nr. 9.06 a.m. 8.36 p.m. 
lv. 8.30 " 7.51 " 
ar.7.86 " 7.86 " 
lv.6.25 " 6.10 " 
lv. 5.00 " 5.00 " 



Through the 
Famous . . ■ 

Berkshire 
Rills . . . 

AND THE 

fllbanp <ia.cu>ap. 

Which is always Open. 



».i.», iMw.n...-.**'.*'-.-— *"— — «*■» *• * ■* w0 * *»«-—» ** 



•00— Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Kellogg of Kingston, 
R. I., recently spent a few days at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Abel Gilbert. 

'00.— J. E. Halligan is now engaged in collecting 
samples of food-stuffs in the eastern part of the state. 

1900. — Morton Campbell is taking a special course 
in chemistry here in preparation for a civil service 
examination. 

'02.— D. N. West was recently appointed instruc- 
tor in elementary German in place of Prof. R. E. 
Smith, resigned. 

Ex-*99. — C. C. Dickinson, station master, South- 
ern Pacific R. R., Bisbee, Arizona. 

Ex-'99— J. C. Chapman, Queens Consolidated 
Copper Mining Co.. Bisbee, Arizona. 



&he HEIR 

to the FARM 



IN MEMORY OF EDWARD THOMAS ESIP, 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 1904. 

DECEASED. 

Whereas. It has pleased our Heavenly Father to remove 
from our midst our friend and classmate, and 

Whereas, Remembering his obliging disposition and smil- 
ing good humor, we deeply mourn his early death, and sym- 
pathize with his family in this hour of affliction, be it there- 
fore 

Resolved, That we the class of Nineteen Hundred and 
Four do hereby extend to his bereaved family our sincere 
and heartfelt sympathy, and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
bereaved family, a copy to the College Signal and that they 
be entered upon the records of the Class, and be printed in 
the Amherst Record. 

C. W. Lewis. i Committe 

A. W. Gilbert. > for the 
R. R. Raymoth, ) Class. 

RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, our Heavenly Father has in his infinite wisdom, 
taken from us brother, F. Y. Spurr, one near and dear to 
him, and 

Whereas, we have been deeply moved by our brother's loss. 
be it therefore 

Resolved, that we extend to Brother Spurr our deepest sym- 
pathy in this hour of sorrow, and be it further 

Resolved, that a copy of these resolutions be inscribed in 
the records of our fraternity and a copy be sent to the 
College Signal for publication. 

H. J. Franklin, ( Committee 
W. E, Tottingham, < for the 
F. A. Ferren. ( Fraternity. 

Amherst, April 8, 1903. 




Will make lliooltl farm pay 
If he f.i 1 ins the farm in the 
modem way. 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

Uaught by Mail. 

A thoroueh and practical con,'..'. 
under the ilircct charge of Witt. P, 
Hrooks, I'll. !>.. (Massachusetts Ag- 
11 ■ ultural College t. Oui coarse la 
baaed on Hrooks' Agriculture;" it 
treats of soils, plants, tillage, drain- 
age,inigatioa,nuuiurea, fertilisation, 
crop rotation and ever yt hing per- 
taining to money-making on the 
farm. Text books (3 volumes, soo 
paxes, 300 Illustrations) fie.? to stu- 
dents. Sand for 36 page hook de- 
scribing course in full. 

Home 

Correspondence 
Schools, 

Spring fitM. Ma.u. 
Other Course: Baatassa, Shorthand, 

I't'iirnaiinhlii, Tyiwwiitinir. Normal 
course niH f..ru-a. Ii.-i V certificate. 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGER, 

200 Broadway, New York. 



Club and College Fins and Rings. 
Gold and Silver Medals. 
Diamond*, Watches, Jewelry. 



(( 



UP TO THE MINUTE" 



IN 



MEN'S FINE SHOES, 
The Northampton Shoe Co, 



88 Main St., 



Northampton, Mam. 



136 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Tufts base ball team has started on its southern 
trip to play Yale, Manhattan and Princeton. 

Andrew Carnegie has offered the Western Reserve 
university the sum of $100,000 for the purpose of es- 
tablishing a school for the training of librarians. 



A good opportunity for two young men 
to learn how to 

RAISE AND SELL VEGETABLES 

so that each acre tilled may be made to 

return from |500 to $1f)00. 



Write or cull on II. M. HOWARD, 

884 Fuller St.j West Newton, Mass. 



|P"I||MII|||II|||JIII|||||||| 

' Hindi & Noblt, Publishers, 31 W. /j/A JB, 
sV. Y.City, will tend you any of thest books sub* _ 
Ject to approi>al. Enclose this advert ist'tnentm 1 



*,» 

.60 

m t 
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Booga of AU th* ColleffM • 
Bonga of the Eastern OolleEM • 
Song* of the Western College* * 
Mew Song* for Glee Club* • 
New Songa for Male Quartette* • 
Mew Sonira for Churcn Quartette* 
Ptaeea That Bare Taken IMiee • 

Sw Piece* That mi Take Priie* I** 

ccee for Every Oocailon • • • '"1 

■ MlnaUDeclntnatione f.>r College Men • 100 ' 

S-Minute Reading* for College Olrla • 1.00 

How to Attract and Hold an Audience • 1.00 

1'almer'a New Parliamentary Manual • .70 

Proa and Cona, (Complete Hebates) • l.M 
Commencamcnt Parte (Oration*. EnaaT*, ttt.) 1.50 
r Oounieoo'a New Plalogne* and ITay» 1.6* . 

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Anvone sendliiR n atcetrh and description may 
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sent free. Oldest ngency for securing patents. 

Patent* taken through Munn A Co. receive 
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Scientific American. 

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in anything else worth having. 



Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER ANO ART DEALER, 



818-816 Miiin St., 



Springfield, Ma<s. 



PHARMA.C1ST. 
NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCKi • • AMIIKRST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 



FANCY AND TOILET AUTK I.KS, IMl'OBTKD AMD 

Imi.M isSTK (Mi A IIS, ( K.AKKTTKS, KTC. 

KERBS* hum ami BB1AB i'ipks, FISHING tacki.k 

AMI SPORTING QOOD8. 

ftl ftn Hit- Cartridge* for Pistols, Sporting ami Springfield 1 ifir« 
Suniliiv nnil night cull > responded to at rMldenoe, first door 
wei-t of Chine's Mock. 




r*HOTOORAJPHE^R, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of* College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIII. 



AMHERST. MASS., APRIL 29, 1903 



NO. 12 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should bo addressed. College Signal, Amherst, Mass. The Signal will bo 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuanco is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904. Editor-in Chief. 

HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. 1904. Business Manager. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905, Assistant Business Manager 
FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904. FRANK FARLEY HUTCHINGS. 1905, Alumni Notes. 

ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904, Interco legiate. JOHN FRANKLIN LYMAN. 1905. College Notes 

ERNEST ADNA BACK, 1904, Department Notes. ALLAN DANA FARRAR, 1906. 

HERBERT HAROLD GOODENOUGH. 1905, Athletics. RALPH WARE PEAKES 1906 



Terms ■ S1.00 per tjear in adcanco. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 28c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 
College Senate, 
Reading-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

A. W. Gilbert, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. H. Griffin, Manager. Base-Ball Association. 

E. B. Snell, Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Five Index. 

A. W. Gilbert, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. S. L. Howard, Sec. 
J. G. Cook, Manager. 
R. L. Allen, Manager. 
G. L. Barrus, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Pest Office at Amherst. 



Edrtori&ls. 



We wish once more to call the special attention of 
our exchanges to the fact that there is no publication 
called " Aggie Life ;" the College Signal is the only 
general publication of the college at present. Kind- 
ly take note of this and address all matter accordingly. 



This is the ideal weather for the tennis lover, and 
he is taking advantage of it. All the courts about 
college have been rolled and most of them are in 
splendid condition. Every year about this time a 
proposition is made concerning a tournament, but it 
has usually ended there. Last year the fraternities 
had contests among their individual members ; can we 
not organize something of a tournament among the 
classes or among the fraternities this year with a prize 
in view to make it more Interesting ? Think it over 
and let us attempt something. 



In our last issue we criticised the electrician for 
not using more haste in stringing the lights about the 



college grounds which we had been informed was the 
intention at some time. We have since learned that 
it is no fault of his that the work is not done, but that 
funds are lacking which necessitates a pause in the 
work, and we take this opportunity of making amends. 
It is also due to the same cause, we are Informed, 
that the grounds west of North college are left in 
their present state of virgin loveliness. Surely enough 
money should be forthcoming to allow that part to be 
harrowed, levelled, and seeded, and put in some 
shape of a campus before commencement, likewise the 
corn-stump lot east of the Drill Hall. And while we 
are In this frame of mind we might inquire what is to 
be done with the pond ? If the sand bar is to be left 
in the south end, we would suggest planting a few 
Tacmahacs and Swamp Oaks, with a border of water 
lilies, it would render it less conspicuous than it is at 
present. Perhaps it would be well to have some 
rushes along the edge to hide the debris. Whatever 
is done, we hope something will be attempted soon. 



We have received some criticism of the policy of 






i3» 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*39 






the Signal in an Indirect way ; that is, someone said 
to someone, and that someone said to us, so and so. 
Now we are always willing to receive suggestions as 
to the carrying out of the principles of the Signal but 
we would rather have the person write us direct. 
We both can be better benefitted in consequence. 
One thing that has puzzled us a great deal, in fact to 
such an extent that we do not know how to deal with 
the problem at all. We have met alumni who have 
criticised the paper and its methods and when ques- 
tioned have confessed that they " haven't read it 
lately, but it used to be awful sometimes," and they 
became so " disgusted that they didn't subscribe to it 
any more." "Loyal supporters of college interests !" 
Do they deserve that title ? I leave that to you who 
do take an interest in the work. We have even met 
some who seem to ignore the college altogether and 
know nothing of what is going on here. Is it because 
their business interests occupy their time so fully that 
they cannot think of the Mater to whom they owe — 
how much ? Ah, they alone know. Where is the 
pride and honor that belong to the college bred men ? 
All dead? Then the future of our college is dark 
and foreboding. When the alumnus forgets his Alma 
Mater what shall we say of the undergraduates ? 
That he shall reap a full harvest from the college and 
when he leaves its walls forget about it? Ah no, 
rather teach him to be more loyal to Massachusetts 
that she maybe able to meet the problems of the 
future with a firmer faith in her sons. If, as Emer- 
son says, a country is known by the kind of men she 
produces, so a college becomes known by the charac- 
ter of her graduates. Be loyal in the interest of your 
Alma Mater and take a pride in her successes and 
comfort her in her failures and mistakes. 



The one feature which characterizes the indus- 
trial world at the present day is the organization 
of forces, and herein is the fable of the bundle 
of twigs realized. The announcement of a 
billion dollar trust causes no more surprise now than 
does the merest bit of news ; we glance at the 
notice, perhaps, and pass on to the next column with- 
out a word. We realize that a combination of simi- 
lar interests Is essential to prosperity in this time of 
competition. The " survival of the fittest " has been 
burned deep into every heart with the iron of experi- 



ence, for only the very strongest are able to operate 
with any degree of success. At the very beginning of 
the industrial history of all countries we find agricul- 
ture occupying the position of greatest importance 
and still at the present day, agricultural products form 
a great part of the wealth of the country ; but those 
engaged in the various pursuits connected with the 
work cannot hope to meet the requirements of the 
time or wield any appreciable power in the world of 
business to-day without intelligent co-operation. It is 
the essential element of their existence, and until they 
realize it they will never occupy the position or com- 
mand the respect due them. At a dinner of the 
•• Farmers " of the Sphinx club given at the Waldorf 
in New York the other night, Herbert Myrick, editor 
of The American AgriculturistAuWy expressed the opinion 
of those who have given the matter careful thought in 
the following words : " In New York state the agricul- 
tural vote will be almost a unit against the grab of 
$100,000,000 for the Erie Canal. Farmers feel that 
the big ditch should be a national rather than a State 
affair, and that good roads used by the masses are 
a better investment than millions in a canal used by 
the few. Instead of cheap rant against trusts, the 
more intelligent farmers are realizing the tremendous 
power of co-operation, and that by employing this 
power intelligently, agriculturists may be placed in a 
dominating position. The movement toward combi- 
nation among farmers, while yetin its infancy, has an 
irresistible momentum. But, unlike some other 
combinations, agricultural co-operation works for the 
good of all. Hence the success of milk producers' 
unions, dairy associations, fruit and truck shipping 
companies and elevators owned by the farmers." 



The failure of the baseball team to score a victory 
has led to our questioning the cause. Lack of good 
coaching is one reason, and this is responsible for an- 
other and more important In the case with Massachu- 
setts, and that is the unwillingness of our fellows to 
keep in training. How often has the question been 
asked, Why is it the baseball team cannot in a meas- 
ure equal the success of the football team ? Leaving 
out the matter of the coach, the most important con 
sideration is the question of training, or in other words 
keeping the body in the " pink of condition " as it is 
called. But there Is where we fail. This we believe 



is the cause of the many errors by which the oppo- 
sing teams profit. We do not allow our football men 
to drop training until the season is over, why should 
we be less strict with the baseball team ? Do you 
say that baseball does not call for the same physical 
requirements that are needed in football ? True, but 
there is the same need of a steady nerve, firm mus- 
cle and power of endurance. If our team could con- 
tinue through the game in the same spirit with which 
they start in, there is every reason to believe that 
credit could be reflected upon Massachusetts in con- 
sequence. But after the third or fourth inning all 
energy seems gone ; the muscles do not respond to 
the will. Come fellows for the sake of your Alma 
Mater hold yourselves in condition to respond to the 
call, keep the body in subjection, the mind and will in 
command and win glory for the college we all love. 
for you can do it, even though there is little oppor- 
tunity for good and thorough training, and we want to 
see you win. But we would not lay all cause for 
failure to the team. There is nothing that so inspires 
a man to do his best or spurs him on to win against 
odds as the rousing enthusiasm of his supporters. 
How often victory has been lifted out of very defeat 
by a rousing cheer ; It seems to put new life and de- 
termination into the heart and steels the nerve and 
clears the eye and brain, and defeat is impossible. 
The cheering here has been very weak, and although 
attendance on the games has been slim, yet enthu- 
siasm should make up for numbers. We stood near 
an alumnus at our last game, who was impatient with 
the fellows for not cheering more. When a member 
of the undergraduate body himself, he led the cheer- 
ing and kept us at it, and when the game was done 
was unable to speak from hoarseness. Perhaps he 
can be justified for his impatience. The cheering 
was certainly perfunctory last Saturday. In our future 
games let us give the heartiest support we can. and 
cheer the team on to success for win we can and win 
we must. 



Spring seems to make some students feel young to 
say the least. Yale men are spinning tops and play- 
ing "MIBS." Wesleyan go one better and play dolls. 

Three military companies have been formed in the 
upper classes at Yale. Captain Samuel A. Linoke, 
U. S. A., has been chosen drill-master. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 

The following from the New York Tribune of April 
9 is of interest as an indication of the impulse given 
to training In the matter of scientific agriculture : 

"Forty young women, students in the District of 
Columbia Normal School, their comeliness enhanced 
by the large gingham aprons which enveloped them, 
their faces beaming as they listened with rapt atten- 
tion to an impromptu lecture on elementary agricul- 
ture delivered by Secretary Wilson, was the pleasing 
picture which greeted a representative of The Tribune 
to-day when he entered the little greenhouse In the 
department grounds which Is especially set aside for 
the use of the pupils of the Normal School. 

The eloquence with which the Secretary elaborated 
his simple propositions and the marked attention which 
was given to his explanations furnished indisputable 
evidence that Secretary Wilson was not only a master 
of his subject, but an enthusiast in his profession and 
a born teacher as well, and in the little incident was 
clearly discernible the cause of the exceptional energy 
and enthusiasm which he has infused into his entire 
department. 

The classes of normal students, one of young men, 
the other of young women, which attend the lectures 
on elementary agriculture and experiment in the tiny 
greenhouse placed at their disposal, constitute a con- 
crete illustration of a system which Is regarded by 
Secretary Wilson as one of the most essential feat- 
ures in the development of the educational methods 
of the country. The Secretary deems It of the ut- 
most importance to the agricultural future of the 
United States that pupils, especially in the rural dis- 
tricts, should have an opportunity in the primary 
grades of becoming familiar with the first principles 
of agriculture. 

" Under the conditions prevailing In most of our 
schools," says Mr. Wilson, "the pupil whose aspira- 
tions lead him to seek the higher education is almost 
invariably led to pursue paths other than that af agri- 
culture, and as a result the best minds in our agricul- 
tural communities are constantly being diverted to 
professional careers which compel their abandonment 
of the farm. This is a grave defect in the system. 
and one that can be easily remedied by the teaching 
of elementary agriculture in the primary schools and 
following it up with opportunities which will enable the 



t40 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



student to fit himself for one of the many excellent 
agricultural colleges which are fast being established 
throughout the country." 

Some effort has already been made along the lines 
indicated with a view to preparing students for entry 
into the agricultural colleges. In New York a system 
of university extension courses has been established. 
Alabama has established an agricultural school in 
every Congress district, for the maintenance of each 
of which the State appropriates $2,500 annually. Mis- 
souri has made some progress by establishing a sum- 
mer school of agriculture for teachers and pupils in 
the normal schools. Minnesota has a school of agri- 
culture, but as yet this does not even prepare students 
for matriculation at any agricultural college. Wis- 
consin and other States have sought to inculcate a 
love for the science of agriculture and simultaneously 
prepare pupils for the agricultural colleges by means 
of "short courses" iii agriculture. 

The great end for which Secretary Wilson is work- 
ing, in season and out, however, is the teaching of the 
first principles of agricultural science to all the pupils 
in the schools of the rural districts, and with this end 
in view he hopes to secure the instruction in the sci- 
ence of agriculture of all persons preparing themselves 
to teach. 

This is the gospel which the Secretary has preached 
far and wide and which he is attempting to inculcate 
by example as well as precept, to which end he has 
invited the students of the District of Columbia Nor- 
mal school to take advantage of the excellent instruc- 
tion and the little greenhouse it is within his power to 
place at thei' disposal. The earnestness with which 
these young peeple have embraced the opportunity 
and the unmistakable enthusiasm with which they 
pursue the study Is the occasion of the greatest en- 
couragement to the Secretary, and, he believes, dem- 
onstrates beyond doubt, that if the educational author- 
ities of each State will afford similar opportunities to 
their normal pupils, they will have little difficulty in 
securing teachers amply capable of teaching the ele- 
mentary principles of agriculture, and, as a result, will 
secure an abundance of pupils for their agricultural 
colleges with an inevitable ultimate improvement in 
the agricultural methods of their sections. 



A new fraternity, the Alpha Zeta Alpha, 
organized as a local chapter at Williams. 



has been 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE 
READING ROOM ASSOCIATION. 

The following itemized report of the treasurer of 
the Reading Room Association for the years 1902- 
1903 is respectfully submitted. 

Receipts. 
78 assessments at $1.75 
12 " •• 1.00 

1 " •• 75 

Telephone tolls 
Auction of magazines 



Expenditures. 
W. W. Peebles, mail carrier 
Telephone service 
J. W. Greegg, mail carrier 
E. R. Clark & Co., magazines 
Expenses of W. W. Peebles while 
acting as treasurer during first 
two weeks of Fall Semester, 



£136 


50 


12 


00 




75 


20 


36 


3 


24 


ES. 




9 


40 


17 


40 


2 


00 


66 


58 



Car fare and telephone 


40 






Papers 


04 






for week 


84 
09 






Expenses to Springfield 1 


35 






Stationery 


50 






Stamps 


66 






Expenses to Northampton 


30 






Telephone 


40 






Car fare 1 


10 










-5 


68 


Receipt book 




1 


50 


John Gregg, mail carrier (old debt) 


3 


00 


Labels for magazines 






75 


E. R. Clark & Co., magazines 




6 


67 


Car fare to Northampton 






20 


Stamps 






20 


* Covers for magazines 




10 


60 


Strings for covers of magazines 


1 


00 


Magazines 






20 


Car fare 






40 


6 keys for locks of boxes and racks 


1 


20 


Stamps 






50 


Telephone service 




1 1 


22 


Strings for covers of magazines 




60 


Telephone service 




13 


27 


A. H. Shannon, mail carrier 




10 


00 


Telephone service 




9 


47 


Balance on hand 




1 


03 



$172 85 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



There is $77.00 in unpaid taxes and about $5.00 
in unpaid telephone tolls. 

The Association has the following debts at pres- 
ent: Telephone service $17.00; A. H. Shannon, 
mail carrier. $5.00; C. Whitaker. mail carrier $7.00; 
a total debt of $29.00. 

*Five covers have been taken from the Reading 
Room and have not been returned. 

R. H. Robertson, Treasurer. 



141 



THE INFORMAL DANCE. 

The fourth informal dance of the college year was 
held Friday. April 24, 1903 from five to nine p. m., in 
the Drill Hall. The hall was decorated with plants 
from the greenhouses. The platform for the musicians 
was placed in the centre on the west side of the hall. 
Warner's orchestra furnished the music and Brown of 
Amherst catered. The Patronesses were Mrs. Waugh 
and Mrs. Brooks. The weather was all that could be 
asked for and the evening was thoroughly enjoyed by 
the twenty-two couples who were present. Although 
the attendance was limited, those present were unani- 
mous in the opinion that it was one of the best in- 
formals that have been held this year ; and the com- 
mittee should receive full credit for their work. There 
were very few present in the gallery. It seems that 
more of the students might help out by being pres- 
ent there and making it more enlivening. 

Those present were: Miss St. John, Miss Rey- 
nolds, Miss Dodge. Miss Parker, Miss Gaylord. Miss 
Irwin, Miss Dervin, Miss Harrington. Miss Ripley, 
Miss Moore, of Smith; Miss Barber, Miss Howe. 
Miss Fowler, Miss Cook, Miss Farrar, Miss Quirk of 
Mt. Holyoke ; Miss Root, Mrs. P. H. Smith, Mrs- 
James Mills, Miss Harlow of Amherst, Miss Dickin- 
son of North Amherst. Miss Webster of Northampton, 
Miss Hunt and Miss Sanborn of Massachusetts. 
Messrs. Allen. Tower, Monahan, Tinkham, West, 
Cook, of 1903. Peck, Quigley, White, Newton, 
Ahearn, Griffin. Couden of 1904. Patch, Munson, 
Swain. Willis. Taylor of 1905; Suhlke of 1906. 
Among the Post graduates present were. P. H. Smith. 
'97. A. W. Morrill, 1900. R. W. Morse. 1902. and 
G. A. Drew, "97. 



BASEBALL. 

Amherst. 7 ; Massachusetts. 2. 
Massachusetts was defeated by Amherst on Pratt 
Field April 13. It was the first game of the season 
for Massachusetts and no doubt accounts largely for 
the rather ragged playing of the team. The team was 
unfortunate in the loss of Ahearn and Lamson caused 
by injuries received while playing. From the start 
Amherst had every thing her own way. There were 
no special features of interest, but the excellent batting 
of Proulx deserves mention. 
The score : 



Amherst 

Wheeler, c. f.. 
Shay, r. f.. 
Ketllher. 2 b., 
Chase, 3 b.. 
Favor. 1 b., 
Rafferty, I. f,, 
Sturgis, s. s., 
Roe. c, 



Storks. 
Rouns 



i. p., 
ville. 



Totals. 
Massach l/SBTTS 
Hunt. 1 b.. 
O'Hearn, 2 b-, 
Ahearn, c, 
Halllgan, c. C, 
Kennedy, p., 
Martin, s.. 
Brooks, 3 b.. 
Lamson, I. f., 
Harvey, r. f.and c. 
McCray. r. f.. 
Proulx. I. f.. 

Totals. 

Innings, 
Amherst, 
M. A. C. 

Sacrifice hits— Ahearn. 



AB 

3 

4 

4 

2 

4 

4 

3 

3 

3 



30 



4 

4 

1 

4 

2 

4 

2 

I 

3 

1 

3 

28 



K 

I 
I 
1 
1 
I 



I 

I 

Q 





I, 











I 
I 



IStB 


2 



2 

I 


I 






IB 



I 


2 







1 

3 



PO 

7 

2 
1 

4 
2 
2 
10 



24 

P.O. 

10 
4 
4 


1 



2 





A 



3 

I 


1 

2 
3 



10 




5 
1 
I 

3 
1 
2 







I 







I 



1 





B. 



I 



3 
3 







7 12 14 7 

I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
3 2 10 10 0—7 
1 1—2 
Stolen bases, Ahearn, Wheeler, Chase, Roe I . 



J ei. — V i-~ . m«/.™ U.3C3, mic4iu. wnecier, unase, rcoe I . 

and Shay 2. First base on balls off-Kennedy. Wheeler and Chase 2 off 
ijtorks, Kennedy 2 off RounsviHe, Brooks 2, and Harvey. Struck out bv 
Kennedy-Wheeler. Favor I, Kelliher 2, by Storks -Halllgan. Harver I 
Hunt 2, by RounsviHe— O'Hearn and Halllgan. Hit by pitcher— Ahearn.' 

Haydenville, 15; Massachusetts, 13. 

On Saturday, April 18, Massachusetts played her 
second game of the season against Haydenville, a 
semi-professional team. It was the first schedule 
game on the campus and proved rather slow and unin- 
teresting. The high cold wind from the northwest 
made fast playing impossible and chilled the spirits of 
both players and spectators. Practice during the week 
had been impossible due to the continued wet weather 
The game resulted in a victory for the visiting team. 

The score : 



Cornell University has 261,37 volumes in her li- 
brary. 



172 8S 



Havdbnvillb. 


A.B. 


R. 


IB. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


Hamilton s. s., 


4 


1 


1 


4 


4 


5 


Dowd, 3b., 


6 







2 


1 


2 


McCarty. 2 b„ 


6 


2 


2 


3 


2 


I 


Ryan. 1 b., 


5 


2 


1 


18 


1 


1 


Reno, c, 


5 


3 


3 


3 


5 


1 


Murphy, c. f., 


5 


1 


2 








1 


Shea, c. f.. 


4 


4 


1 








? 


Bowthwell. r, f., 


4 


2 


1 








I 


J. Larkin, p., 


5 





1 





7 


1 



Totals, 



44 



15 



11 



26 20 









14 



Ma 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



i 



Massachusetts. 


A.B 


K. 


IB. 




P.O. 




A. B. 


Halligan, c. f.f., 


6 


3 


2 









1 


O'Hearn. 2b., 


5 


J 


1 




8 




2 1 


Proulx. r. f., 


6 





1 












Hunt. tb.. 


6 










10 




2 3 


Kennedy, p.. 


S 










I 




8 


Harvey, c, 


5 


3 


1 




5 




1 2 


Gregg, 1. f., 
Brooks, 3b,. 


4 


1 







1 







2 


1 












2 2 


Martin, s. s.; 


3 


3 







2 




4 


Total. 


41 


13 


5 




27 




19 9 


Innings, 
Haydenviile, 




1 2 


3 4 


B 


6 


7 


8 9 




3 


t 


4 





2 


5 0—15 


M. A. C. 




2 


2 








1 


4 4—13 



Sacrifice hits— O'Hearn, Brooks. Stolen bases— Reno. Two-base hits 
—O'Hearn, Proulx. Murphy. Home runs— McCarty. First base on balls 
—off Kennedy Reno, Bowthwell, Hamilton, Ryan : off Larkin, Brooks 3. 
Martin 2. Hunt and Ohearn 1. Struck out by Kennedy— Hamilton 2, Reno 
and Shea 1 I by Larkin— O'Hearn, Brooks and Kennedy. Hit by pitcher- 
Gregg, Hamilton and Shey. Double plays— O'Hearn. Kennedy, Hunt and 
O'Hearn. Passed ball, Reno 2, Harvey 1. Time — 2 hours. Umpire — 
Ahearn. 

Bates, 14; Massachusetts. 5. 

Last Friday the game with Bates resulted In 
another defeat for Massachusetts on the campus. 
The game opened well for the home team and things 
looked very bright but after the third inning they 
played a ragged game. Costly errors allowed the 
visitors to score frequently. The features of the game 
were a home run hit by O'Hearn over center field, a 
double play by Hunt, O'Hearn and Harvey and a dif- 
ficult catch of a hot liner by a high jump by Kendall. 

The score : 



Bates. 

Allen, s. . 
Kendall, 2.. 
Stone, c. 
Bucknam, 1 . 
Nichols, 3., 
Doe. m., 
Russell, 1., 
Maery, r., 
Towne, p., 

Totals, 

M. A. C. 

Martin, s., 
O'Hearn, 2, 
Harvey c, 
Waiker.21. 
Brooks, 3. 
Halligan, m. 
Hunt, 1. 
Ingham, r., 
Blake, r., 
Kennedy, p., 



A.B. 

3 
4 
5 
5 
5 
4 
5 
5 
5 



p.o. 
2 
3 
8 

1 



12 



1 



A. 

3 
3 
1 


1 



1 


2 



41 


11 


27 


11 


3 


A.B. 


B, 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


4 


1 


4 


3 


2 


2 





4 


1 





2 


1 


1 








2 


1 


3 


1 


1 


3 


I 


I 





2 


3 





12 


1 


2 


3 


1 











1 











1 


2 





1 


5 


2 



11 



Totals. 24 6 27 13 

Innings, 123456789 

Bates, 4 3 10 4 2—14 

M. A. C. 2 10 2 0—5 

Runs— Doe 4. Stone 3, Kendall 2. O'Hearn 2, Walker, Allen. Bucknam, 
Nichols, Russell. Maery, Martin. Kennedy. Sacrifice hits— Kendall, Brooks, 
Walker. Stolen bases — Harvey, Brooks, Martin. Two-base hit— Russeli. 
Three base hit— Towne. Home run— O'Hearn. First base on ball, Allen, 
Doe, Martin, Walker. Left on bases— Massachusetts State College 8, Bates 
5. Struck out— Nichols. Kennedy, Ingham, Walker, Russell. Blake. 
O'Hearn. Batters hit— Allen, RusseM, Brooks. Time— lh, 35m. Umpire 
— Dun'eavy. 

The Wesleyan freshmen have voted that the fresh- 
man class shall rise and remain standing in their places 
while the juniors march out of the chapel each morn- 
ing. The custom Is an entirely new one. 



'43 



Colleg* N°**S- 



— Goodenough, '05, has recovered from the measles. 

— The Sophomores have begun outdoor work in 
Surveying. 

— Naughty-three planted their class tree last Sat- 
urday night. 

— Sheldon, Northampton has been chosen class 
photographer by the Seniors. 

— The annual inspection of the Military Depart- 
ment will take place May 28. 

— Pres't Goodell has returned home from the 
South where he passed the winter. 

— The Seniors made their first appearance in caps 
and gowns at chapel Sunday, April 5. 

— The Freshmen have elected Farrar manager, 
and Taft captain of their base ball team. 

— Lewis, '04, and Spurr, '06, have left College. 
Lewis expects to return next September. 

— Williams has been elected manager, and Patch 
captain of the Sophomore base ball team. 

— Arrangements have been made whereby the 
Band will go to Belchertown on Memorial Day. 

— Hastings, '06, is reported as improving. He ex- 
pects to return to College the first week in May. 

— The flag pole has been put into position and 
every day the stars and stripes wave over our heads. 

— Foster, '06, has left College to take a position in 
the topographical department of the U. S. Geological 
Survey. 

— A party from the Senior class saw "San Toy" 
played at the Academy of Music, Northampton, 
April 10. 

— The different fraternities have put their tennis 
courts into fine condition. About the usual amount 
of interest is shown in the game. 

— Capt. Ahearn, '04, and Lamson, '03, were injured 
in the practice game with Amherst April 13. Neither 
is yet able to be in the game again. 

— At a mass meeting of the undergraduates. Prof. 
Harmon was elected to fill the place formerly occu- 
pied by Prof. Smith in the Athletic Association. He 
has been made auditor. 



—Beginning with Friday evening, May ] . the band 
will give a concert on the campus once a week. 

— Couden, Haskell, Cook. Gilbert, and Raymoth 
have been elected to the editorial board of the Press 
Club. 

—Poole, Tottingham, Peebles, Parsons, Franklin 
and West have been appointed Commencement 
speakers. 

—Richardson, '05,and Yeaw, '05. recently insp ected 
Pierson's green-houses at Cromwell, Conn. Mr. 
Pierson has one of the largest carnation and rose 
growing establishments in the country. 

—Grading around the Dining Hall has been begun, 
and already the appearance of the building is greatly 
improved. There is a fine opportunity, however, for 
some of cur landscape gardeners to beautify the place 
still further. 



Mass. 1906. 
Shannon, p., 
Martin, s s., 
Tirrell. lb- 
Kennedy. 2b., 
Taft. c. 
Strain, 3b., 
Rogers, c.f., 
Hartford, l.f„ 
Cutter, r.f., 
Webb, p., 
Mahoney, L#„ 

Totals, 

Innings, 
Amherst high, 
M. A. C. Freshmen, 



A.B. 

I 

4 
5 
3 

4 
4 
4 
1 

4 
3 
2 

35 
I 2 
7 




B. 



3 

I 





1 

2 



2 





9 
3 4 

6 
I 



P.O. 



3 
12 

2 

4 

I 

5 









A. 



5 



3 

2 









2 











4 

1 

2 







I 





27 12 8 

5 6 7 8 9 

2 2 0-17 

1 JOI-4 



MfrtT2: H H e ate,, 4 er. Matne'y ''sKSE 3| £* 3 j He ^ I <** * 

Foley 2, Hepburn 2, Palmer ^ rjanfhev H,^h7,5 e 1!. edy ' § ,0 jF n biiea ~ 
Two-base hit -DanahVy Hubbard Ro^.tk ""i!*' Cobb ' Ms "" n - 
Home runs-Danahey 2 Martin F^ h . Thr « e :, ba se hlt-Pal mer , 

Webb8.offSha n ^on y 2.''s,™Tou, Fi y C^bb ?0 ^ ^WebbT*^ 2" 

no^mpfr^Hun,^ ba '™ ™ d &-S&1&V T^* 



—Tottingham. '03, and Robertson. '03. have ac 
cepted positions as chemists at the Hatch Experiment 
Station. Robertson will work in the department of 
soils and fertilizers and Tottingham in the department 
of foods and feeding. 

— •' When a student is conditioned in one or two 
studies at the end of the second semester of the 
year, he must be examined, in the study, or studies, 
on Monday. Tuesday, or Wednesday preceding the 
opening of the next semester." Amended. April 6 
1903. 



Amherst High School, 17; M. A. C. Freshmen, 4. 

The Freshmen baseball team played that of Amherst 
High School last Saturday afternoon on the campus 
and was badly defeated. It was the first time the 
team had played together and that combined with the 
fact that they played a very fast aggregation accountes 
largely for the high score. The battery work of Cobb 
and Danahey was exceptionally good for a small high 
school. For '06 Martin. Rogers and Tirrell excelled. 

The score : 

Amhbrst Hioh. 
Palmer, lb.. 
Foley, 3b., 
Hepburn, s.s.. 
Danahey. c. 
Hubbard. I.f., 
Hall, 2b.. 
Ashley, r.f., 
Henry, c.f., 
Cobb, p.. 

Totals. 



A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


7 


3 


10 


1 


1 


5 


1 





1 


1 


6 


2 


1 


1 





5 


3 


10 


1 





3 


1 


1 








6 


1 


4 


3 


? 


6 


1 











4 


1 








n 


3 





1 


7 






46 



13 



27 



14 



HORTICULTURAL SEMINAR. 

On April 10, the Seminar was highly entertained 
and instructed by an address given by Mr. H. W Col- 
lingwood. farmer, of New Jersey, Editor of Rural New 
Yorker, a native of Massachusetts and a graduate of 
Michigan Agricultural college, who spoke on the gen- 
eral subject of agricultural education. He gave many 
striking and amusing observations and experiences 
from different parts of the country, all tending to show 
the advantage of thorough equipment for work. He 
thought the largest opportunities for a man of limited 
means are to be found on New England farms. 

G. Harold Powell, Assistant Pomologist of the De- 
partment of Agriculture. Washington. D. C. gave a 
talk on "Cold Storage" before the Seminar Friday 
April 17. 

Prof. Waugh has made no definite arrangement as 
yet for the next meeting of the Seminar. The Prof, 
is doing his utmost, however, to secure a certain able 
man to address the meeting. 

NOTICE. 

The Senior Prom, will be held in the Drill Hall on 
Tuesday evening. June 16. 1903. The committee 
are striving to make this, their final social effort, 
eclipse every Promenade held heretofore. We 
especially ask for the aid of the alumni and desire to 
see a large number of them present. All those in- 
tending to be present at the Prom, will confer a great 
favor on us by notifying the secretary, C. P. Halli- 
gan, to that effect. Let every alumnus, who can, be 
present and help us to give the best Prom, ever held 
at this institution. 

Wm. E. Allen, Chairman. 



■44 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



h 



Dep&rtmfrvf ^lot?s. 

The Entomological Department has undertaken the 
mammoth task of a complete re-arrangement of the 
insect collections which belong to the department, and 
to the station. 

The custom hitherto followed has been to arrange 
the specimens in rows running from left to right, with 
special trays for the life histories and samples of the 
work of those Insects which could be obtained. This 
system has been quite unsatisfactory, and the need has 
long been felt for an arrangement whereby the instruc- 
tor or student could turn to some one definite place 
and there find all the stages of an insect's history 
which have been worked out at the Insectary. together 
with specimens of its work and such other things as 
might be of interest in connection with the insect. 

This want is now being satisfied. The professors in 
charge are putting much time and labor into what 
seems an almost perfect arrangement of the collection 
by the column method. With this arrangement each 
insect is allowed enough room for all its stages now 
present in the collection, and for those which may be 
subsequently added. This method of arrangement 
takes much more room, but sets off each insect to a 
much better advantage, besides obviating the necessity 
of searching through the various trays to find out 
whether or not this or that stage of the specimen in 
question is in the collection. 

***** 

The collection, which has for so many years been 
kept in the Zoological lecture room for reference in 
connection with the work in Junior entomology, has 
been removed to the Insectary. As it contains many 
forms which are not in the collection at the latter 
place, besides many that are of no benefit to the Junior 
work, Dr. Fernald has had it removed and is incorporat- 
ing it into the Insectary collection ; thus making the 
latter more valuable from a purely scientific stand 
point. 

To fill the place of this inadequate collection, Dr. 
Fernald is getting together one which will be more in 
sympathy with his lectures. These are for the most 
part entirely economic, and this collection will contain 
those insects mentioned in his lectures as of economic 
importance, together with such others as may be 



'45 



necessary to give the student a general idea of the 
several insect orders. 

There will be present, also, as far as possible, the 
work of each of these insects and their different stages 
which are obtainable. 

Each insect will bear its common, as well as its 
scientific name. It is hoped by this plan to make th e 
work in this course much clearer and simple, and of 
greater economic importance than it has previously 

been. 

***** 

Of all the improvements which have taken place on 
the Horticultural grounds, none exceed in interest the 
orchard of dwarf trees which has recently been set out 
under the direction of Prof. Waugh. The special 
attention of the public, as well as that of the students, 
deserves to be called to this entirely new undertaking. 
On less than one half an acre may be found between 
five and six hundred apple, pear, plum, and peach 
trees ; the majority of which have been imported direct 
from France. 

The object of this experiment is to set forth, in an 
interesting and instructive way, the German and French 
methods of dwarfing and pruning many of their trees. 
The dwarfing method is hardly known in America 
to-day and while it will probably never be of great com- 
mercial value, its practicability in its application to 
gardens is bound to make itself felt more and more as 
it is better understood. This method of culture is 
more expensive but the fruit is usually superior In size, 
color, and quality, to any grown under the ordinary 
methods. 

The trees are all budded or grafted on dwarf stock. 
There are two rows of horizontal cordons. To form 
the horizontal cordon, the stem is bent horizontally at 
the height of eighteen inches, and is allowed to grow 
about three feet in length. At this distance another 
tree is planted and bent toward the next, and so on. 
Along this horizontal stem fruit spurs and buds are 
formed by pruning and budding. If at any time the 
gardener desires to increase the fruiting capacity of his 
tree, he inserts a fruit bud at the desired spot in the 
fall. To obtain a good healthy growth, a few strong 
leaders are allowed to grow each year from the 
extreme end of the horizontal part of the tree. These 
grow upright. There are three rows of upright cordons; 
one of pears, one of apples, and one of plums. 



Trees not grown in this way are of two types ; the 
vase, and the pyramid. In the former case the main 
stem is cut back and the side shoots are developed. 
By this method a dwarf bushy tree about eight feet 
high is formed. The pyramid type differs from the 
vase in that there is an excurrent stem from which the 
fruiting spurs spring. This form also grows to about 
eight feet high. 

By no other system of pruning can such large and 
beautiful fruit be grown. As only a few fruits are 
allowed to set upon each tree, all the vigor of the tree 
goes into these few, and as they are fully exposed to 
the sun, a large and showy fruit is the results. 

Of the many attractions offered by the college, none 
will surpass this curious lot of trees. The visitor com- 
ing here will go away with the feeling that he has 
indeed seen some thing wonderful. The article has 
been written that the public and the students may 
become interested in Prof. Waugh's unique experi- 
ment and watch its growth. One may even now find 
two trees one year from bud in bloom ! To see trees 
two years from bud in fruiting condition will be a 
novelty to us all. 



In 1862 the Congress of the United states passed 
an act offering to each and every state, willing to 
establish and maintain a college for the benefit of agri- 
culture and the mechanics arts, a certain amount of 
the public lands porportional to its representation in 
Congress. The gift was coupled with two conditions : 
first, that the proceeds arising from the sale of public 
lands should be set aside inviolably for the mainten- 
ance of said colleges ; and second, that it should be 
invested a five per cent. interest in United States bonds, 
state bonds, or any other safe bonds. 

There has been no difficulty until last year in obtain- 
ing the annual income from this Technical Educa- 
tional Fund, United States Grant, as it is called. 
However, last year the bonds ran out.and the treasurer 
of the Commonwealth found that he could not again 
invest the sum at five per cent, as heretofore. Two 
per cent, was the highest interest obtainable. Although 
the law demands that the college receive five per 
cent, interest, the rate of interest has so fallen during 
the past few years, that it was an impossibility to 
realize this by the present Investment. What was to 



be done ? Was the college to lose three fifths of 
its usual income ? 

In this strait President Goodell went to Boston and, 
with considerable tact, influenced the legislature to 
appropriate enough money to make up to the college 
the deficiency caused by the lowering of the rate of 
interest. This gain was only temporary. To secure 
the receipt of this sum from the treasury of the Com- 
monwealth in years to come, he went again this year 
to the legislature and worked for the passage of the 
act printed below. The bill was passed. We no 
longer need fear for the college's annual income. 

President Goodell has our most hearty tlrnks and 
praise for his aid in this as in other times of need. 

AN ACT RELATIVE TO THE TECHNICAL 
EDUCATIONAL FUND. UNITED 
STATES GRANT. 
Section 1. The treasurer and receiver-general is 
hereby authorized to pay annually into the technical 
educational fund, United States Grant, such sums of 
money as may be necessary with the income of the 
fund to produce five per centum per annum interest 
on the two hundred and nineteen thousand dollars in 
said fund, in order to comply with an implied agree- 
ment between the Commonwealth and the United 
States, that the money received from land scrip shall 
constitute a perpetual fund for the promotion of educa- 
tion in agriculture and the mechanic arts, and shall be 
invested in such manner as to pay interest at the rate 
of five per centum per annum. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

The sum of $1600 has been granted by the legisla- 
ture for the establishment of an agricultural labora- 
tory. This will be situated In the basement of South 
College. 

Five hundred dollars has been appropriated by the 
legislature for the laying out of walks and the general 
improvements of the grounds about college. 

The legislature has appropriated an amount of 
money for the completion of Draper Hall. The 
upper floor is not yet finished. Work will begin 
upon the building soon after :ollege closes. 

The proof reading on the college and experiment 
station catalogue is finished and the catalogue is 
expected to appear early in May. 



1 4 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Alu 



mm. 



It may be of Interest to the readers of the Signal 
to note the way in which the College has become 
identified with the work of the Mass. State Dep't of 
Agriculture. The following are a list of those alumni 
most prominently identified in the work : 

75. — P. M. Harwood, general agent, Mass. Dairy 
Bureau, Mass. State Board of Agriculture. 

•81. — Dr. Austin Peters, chief of the Cattle Bu- 
reau. Mass,, State Board of Agriculture. 

,87. — F. H. Fowler, first clerk and librarian, Mass. 
State Board of Agriculture. 

'91. — H. N. Legate, second clerk, Mass. State 
Board of Ag riculture. 



75 _W. H. Knapp, florist, Newtonville, Mass. 

75. — M. Bunker, Veterinary Surgeon, 4 Baldwin 
St., South Newton, Mass. 

75. — George M. Miles, merchant and cattle raiser, 
Helena. Montana. 



S pring Clothes . 

Just the sorts that young men will appreciate. 
There's a collection here that absolutely cannot 
be found elsewhere in Western New England. 
Will you come and see it? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 

Haynes & Co., 



Always Reliable. 



Springfield, 



Mass. 




PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 

New York 

Central 

Lines 



DAILY SERVICE. 



THROUQH COACHES 

BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



SLEEPING CARS 



DINING CARS 



EXPRESS 


TRAIN 


SERVICE 




TO AND FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER 








AS FOLLOWS : 






KKAII llOWW. 




RKAI 


OP. 


9.0B A.M 


. 6.02 P.M. 


It. Amherst 


ar. 9.06 a.m. 


8.36 P.M. 


•t.ao " 


6.45 " 


ar. P«lmer 


It. 8.90 " 


7.51 " 


lo.oo " 


B.68 " 


iv. Palmer 


ar.7.86 " 


736 M 


10..*) " 


8.01 " 


ar. Worcester 


It. 6.26 •• 


6.10 " 


11 so " 


9.08 " 


ar. Boston 


It. 5.00 " 


5.00 " 



To ALBANY, 
To BUFFALO, 
To CHICAGO, 
To CINCINNATI, 
To DETROIT, 
To ST. LOUIS, 



Through the 
Famous . . . 



9 Tra 
8 Tra 
7 Tra 
3 Tra 
5 Tra 
3 Tra 



ns 
ns 
ns 
ns 
ns 
ns 



Berkshire 

mils . . . 

AND THE 

Hlbanp 6auu>ap, 

Which it always Open. 



For further information, time tables, etc., call on ticket agents or address, A. S. HANSON, G. P. A., Boston, Mass. 



V 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




'92.— Dr. W.J. Boynton of Springfield recently 
spent a few days In town. 

'92.— J. E. Deuel and family have just returned 
from a two weeks' visit to New York city and vicinity. 
'92.— H.M. Thompson is pleasantly located as super- 
intendent of the Reams estate, Thompson, Conn 
The estate includes besides the fine residence and 
driving stables of Mr. Reams, an equipment for the 
most advanced methods in farming and dairying,— a 
large green-house and a pumping and lighting station 
for the sole use of the estate. Besides this large es- 
tate there is a smaller estate owned by Mr. Reams 
and conducted on the same general lines. At the 
distance of a mile and a half from there is situated a 
large park of seventy acres of wooded land kept by 
Mr. Reams for game and recreation. 

•93.— We beg to correct a mistake made in the 
last issue of the S.gnal, where in the name of Mr 
Felt as secretary of the Mass. Fruit Growers associa- 
tion was entered instead of Mr. Fred A. Smith. 

'95,— Word has been received from Mr. Ballou at 
Dominica. Lesser Antilles, where he is stopping at 
present. He is now on a journey of inspection about 
the different islands, after which he will make his 
headquarters at Barbados. The question of the 
fungus attacking the sweet potato is now receiving 
his special attention. 

'83.— On Wednesday, April 22, at the home of the 
bride, 98 Preston St., Danvers, Charles Henry Pres- 
ton and Nellie Chapman Nichols were united in mar- 
riage. 

Ex.-'99.— C. C. Dickinson has recently been trans- 
ferred from Bisbee. Arizona to Los Angeles. Califor- 
nia where he will act as telegraph operator for the 
Sante Fe R. R. 

'00.— M. B. Landers of Saginaw Medical School 
spent a day in town recently. 

'02.— John Clifford Hall has recently received an 
appointment as teacher at the government agricultural 
school for Indians at Chllocco Oklahama. 

'02.— R. W. Morse of Salisbury, Conn., has been 
spending his vacation in Amherst and vicinity. 



&he HEIR 
to the FARM 



Will make (lio old farm pnv 
If M fauns the farm in the 
modern way. 



A**, 



j 



!/ 



W —W.M I'Uj. 

Modern 
; rf cul- 
ture 

6 'aught by Mail. 

A thorough ;ind practical BOOTM 

under tli, : ilimi chart* of Win. V 

Brooks, Ph.D.. (Maaaaefluaattt a,: 
rieahpral Colla,.). Our connw S 
..M-d on Brooks' Agriculture;" it 
"•aMof soils, plants, tillace, drain. 
k «a.UTi«ation,uianurem,ferti)ltati m 
crop rotation mid everything p< ■•'- 
Utniai to mouey-makin« on t,'. a 
farm. Trxt books (3 \ lumea BOO 
Paecs, 300 illustrations) fras to ■ i 
•'■ nts. Send r.r .u, ,, jyu book da- 
scnUne comse iu full. 

Home 

Correspondence 
•Schools, 

SpringfMd. Mojj. 

Other Course: lliMliietn,, Shorthand 
I'rnmanuhl,,. TypewrlMnjr. Norma? 
t-outve fits fort. L-r'hcertimate 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGBH, 

200 Broadway, New York. 



Club and College Pins and Rings. 
Gold and Silver Medals. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jawelry. 



"UP TO THE MINUTE" 



IN 



One hundred and twenty men are trying for the 
Harvard rowing crew. 



MEN'SJTNE SHOES, 
Tbe Northampton Shoe Go, 



88 Main St., 



Northampton, Mass 



148 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Friends of the late Edwin L. Godkin have presented 
to Harvard University $10,500, the income to be 
used for annual lectures on good citizenship. The 
donors are said to be J. P. Morgan and Andrew Car- 
negie. 

A good opportunity for two young men 
to learn how to 

RAISE AND SELL VEGETABLES 

so that each acre tilled may he made to 
return from $600 to $1500. 



Write or call on H. M. HOWARD, 

281 Fuller St., Wkst Newton, Mass. 



III! 



llimilliilllJHiUIIIIII 

Hinds & Noble, PuHUktrt, 31 tV. 15th St^ 



I 

J Hinds &• Noblt, Publishers, 31 

N, Y.City, will send you any of these books sub- _ 
feet to approval. Enclose this advertisement, 1 



Song* of AH tho College* • » • 

Bong* of the Kutern College* • • 

Songs of Iho Western College* • . 

New Song* for Oleo Club* • • a 

New Song-* for Male Quartette* • • 

New Song* for Church Quartette* * 

Pt»ce* That Hare Taken Prize* • • 
Mn> Piece* That Will Take Prlxe* 

JMece* for Every Ocra*jon • * - • 

8 Minute Declamation* f«>r College Hen • 
S-Minute Reading* for College Qlrl* 

How to Attract and Hold an Audience * 

Palmer's Now Parliamentary Manual • 

Pro* and Con*, (Complete Debates) • 

Commencement Part* (Oration*. Kenr*, a 
Ouonleoa'* Now Dialogue* and Plaj* 






SO YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a nketrh and description may 
qulrkly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention Is probably pntentuble. Communica- 
tions Rtrictlyeonfideiitlfil. Handbook on Patent* 
sent free. Oldest aaoncy for seciirniK patents. 

Patents taken through Munn A Co. receive 
tprrUil notice, without c hnrft o. In the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. 



dilation of any sclent Mc journal. 

"old by all newsdealers. 



Largest clr- 

Terms, $3 a 

four months, $1. Sold byall newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 36,B ' oad -> New York 

Branch Office. 836 V St., Washington. D.C. 



yciir : 







Write a Note 

to Johnson 




when you want a book, a picture, some st.'ttioiicry 
or anything else worth having, 



Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AND ART DEALER, 



313-315 Main St., 



Springfield, Ma*s. 






NO. 1 COOK'S IILOCK, 



AMIIKItST. MASS 



Pure Drags and Medicines, 



r> 



FANCY At»D TO! LOT AUTK 1,1-S, IMPORTED AM) 
DOMESTIC CTGABS, CIGARETTES, KT( . 

MEERSCHAUM AND KUIAR PIPES, fishing TACKJ.K 
AND spoiiTIN(« GOODS. 

Mi tniiic CartridgM for Platola, Sporting hh<i sprinRfipM rifl*-* 
Sunday ninl night cull - raapoodeU to at resilience, first door 
west of Cbaaa'a Block. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




s, d , .. Pushed Fortnightly b, Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural Coll,,, 

notify th« Bualnesi M anager. **"■ Subacrlb «™ who do not receive their paper regularly are requested t. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904, Editor-in Chief 

HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. 1904. Business Manager 
FAYETTE D.CK.NSON COUDEN ^ "^^ ^"^ ' 905 ' *"'*»"' Business Manage, 

ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904, Interpolate. ^nuH^K,bf Y HUTCH,NG S. 1905. Alumni Noles. 

ERNEST ADNA BACK, 1 904. Department Notes. nlnl, '" L ™ AN ' ' 9 ° 5 ' Colle e e No,M - 

HERBERT HA ROL D COODENOUO H. .^Athletics. ^ L PH wTrVpTaKES. JR 

-J^lll^'l'!^^ outside o, £5*4 state. anJ Cnada. 2Bc Mtr .. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate. 
Reading-Room Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

A. W. Gilbert. Pres. Athletic Association. 

C. H. Griffin, Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

E. B. Snell, Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Five Index 

A. W. Gilbert. Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. S. L. Howard, Sec. 
J. G. Cook, Manage,. 
R. L. Allen, Manager. 
G. L. Barrus, Pres. 



Entered •■ second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Editorials. 



There is a constantly increasing demand for 
trained men from technical schools. This Is the age 
in which the Natural Sciences and Useful Arts 
occupy the most prominent position in the world of 
business, and the most experienced men in these 
studies attain to a prominence that is enviable, hence 
the great cry among all classes of men for scientific 
training. The opportunities of such are offered to 
each of us at Massachusetts and there is no need to 
doubt but that every man who makes good use of 
these opportunities, will be in a position to command 
a position of some importance, and there is every 
reason to believe that he will get it. The following 
from a well known paper is an evidence of the great 
demand at present felt in the industrial world: ■■ The 
Engineering Agency. Monadnock Block, Chicago, 
says It received applications in one day last week for 
67 high-grade technical men, one company asking 
for 25 blast-furnace draftsmen at $125 to $150 a 
month, and another company for 30 structural drafts- 



men at $125 a month. The agency has vacannies 
on its books for over 200 competent men, including 
instructors in shop work for technical colleges, teacher 
for manual-training school, assistant editor for techni 
cal journal, chemists, engineers of all kinds, shop 
superintendents, draftsmen, etc. It has special facili- 
ties for placing good technical men In positions for 
which they are best fitted, and in that section of the 
country where they prefer to work. Over 5,000 men 
have been so placed by it during the last 10 years. 
The officers of the agency are : President. F. A. 
Peckham, for 12 years with the Engineering News; 
treasurer, A. B. Gilbert, for 1 I years with the Engl 
neering News ; secretary, A. G. Frost. 



It is our purpose to make the Signal as represent- 
ative of the College as it is possible and as it is the 
only college paper it must necessarily Include what 
literary matter it is possible to obtain together with 
news of general interest concerning the College. To 
be representative however it must express the opinions 
of the many and not the ideas of the few. It there- 



<l 






»5<> 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



fore rests with the College as a whole to be inter- 
ested in the work. An editorial board naturally at- 
tends specifically to the work of collating all articles 
submitted and managing the finances of the paper ; 
but to demand that it shall express the full views of 
the undergraduate body is both unreasonable and im- 
possible. The idea of a daily newspaper or weekly 
and monthly periodical limiting the entire production 
of copy to the editorial staff is amusing, and a paper 
run on such lines would soon leave the field of liter- 
ary activity. For though there are men wno possess 
such magnificent minds that are capable of filling 
volumes with gems of thought, deep and stirring, they 
become exceedingly passe when they attempt to run 
a paper wholly with their own ideas. It takes all 
kinds of people to make a world, the proverb says, 
and certainly without variety in thought and action, 
the world would die of ennui. We are all subject to 
the mania of " riding a hobby," and although we may 
never grow tired of it, the continual rock becomes 
monotonous and irritable to those about us. The 
conflict of opinions, the class of swords in the battle 
of thought, stir all with a quickening of mind and 
spirit. The heat of argument starts the sap of wit In 
the sleeping brain.and the response is a bursting into a 
newness of life and thought. Old ideas are laid aside 
and new ones analyzed and experimented with, and 
the result is growth and progress. The same condi- 
tions exist in the college world. Some of us need a 
stirring up, with a little ambition thrown in to start the 
reaction. Now there comes to each one of you from 
time to time some idea that is worth considering, give 
expression to the thought and see what it looks like 
In print, and besides there's the added advantage of 
seeing before you in bold, black letters, your own 
name, initials and all ; for say what we please there is 
a desire — perhaps hidden way down in some recess of 
the heart — to see how we look in print. Why men 
have committed robbery and murder to achieve the 
notoriety obtained from a newspaper. Now there is 
no need of any one here going to that extent. When 
anything of interest concerning the college comes to 
your attention, let us all have the benefit of its 
import. One word, however, we are not asking for 
stories as such, in fact we are going to fight shy of 
them for sometime, but we do want some good short 
articles of interest, preferably relating to scientific or 



technical subjects. Let each man take a pride In his 
Signal and strive to make it one of the best and 
most noted of college periodicals, so that It shall 
occupy a little more prominence than a mere notice 
in the exchange column of our contemporary papers. 



BASEBALL. 

Bowdoin, 19; Massachusetts, 1. 

Last Wednesday afternoon Massachusetts played 
the first game of the Maine trip with Bowdoin college 
and proved an easy victim. The overwhelming score 
was undoubtedly due to the condition of the men who 
had had no time to rest after their long ride from 
Boston on the cars. The features were the batting 
of Cox, Clark and Harvey and the fielding of White 
at short. 

The score : 



BOWDOIN. 



White, s.s. 
Mundo, c.f. 
Cox. r.f., p. 
Havey. lb. 
Blanchard, c. 
Clarke, !. f. 
Bly, 2b. 
Gould, 3b. 
Oakes. p. 
Johnson, r.f. 

Totals, 



Martin, s.s. 
O'Hearn, 2b. 
Halligan. c.f. 
Harvey, c. 
Kennedy, p. 
Proulx, r.f. 
Gregg, l.f. 
Brooks. 3b. 
Walker, lb. 
Hunt, p. 



4 
I 
I 

3 
| 

5 
5 
8 

5 

1 



B 


1 

4 
1 

2 
t 
1 
2 




P.O. 
2 
3 
1 
9 
8 


3 
t 




A. 

3 


1 
1 


3 

4 




1 













M. A. c. 



46 


12 


27 


12 


1 


A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


4 





1 


1 


3 


a 





7 


2 


3 


3 





1 








4 


3 


3 


2 


3 


a 





1 


3 





3 














3 





3 





1 


4 





1 








4 


1 


7 


1 


1 


















31 
1 2 

1 8 
I 



24 
5 5 7 
1 5 




II 



9 

8 9 

4 0— 10 

0— 1 



Totals, 

Innings. 
Bowdoin. 
M. A. G.. 

Runs— White 2, Munroe 3, Cox 3. Harvey 3. Clarke 3. Bly 3, Gould. 
Oakes O'Hearn. Two-base hits— Clarke, Harvey. Three-base hits— 
Munro' Cox. Clarke. Bases on balls— off Oakes 4. off Cox. off Kennedy 8, 
o'ftHunl 2. Struck oul-by Oakes 7. by Cox 2, by Kennedy 4. Passed 
ball— Harvey. Time— 2 hrs., 30 mln. Umpire— Toothacker. 

Bates, 6; Massachusetts, 5. 

In the best played game of the season Massachu- 
setts went down to Bates last Friday. It was the 
second game of the Maine trip and proved very excit- 
ing throughout. Cook was In the box for Massachu- 
setts for the first time this year and his good work 
was a surprise to everyone. Bates won in the ninth 
Inning when with two men out and two strikes on the 
third man two more runs were brought In. 

The score : 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*5i 



bates. 



Austin. 2b. 
Allen, s.s. 
Stone, c. 
Buckman, l.f. 
Nichols, 3b. 
Marcy, r. f. 
Doe. c. '. 
Cole, lb. 
Towne, p. 

Totals. 



Martin, s.s. 
O Hearn, 2b. 
Halligan, c.f. 
Harvey, c. 
Kennedy, r.f. 
Gregg, l.f. 
Brooks, 3b. 
Walker, lb. 
Cook. p. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



B.H. 
1 

3 
2 
I 





2 



B.H. 


1 



1 

2 
1 



I 



P.O. 

I 
3 

12 



1 

9 
1 

27 



P.O. 

3 

4 
3 
8 

1 
1 
5 




A. 


3 


2 



2 



A. 


3 







1 



Millers Falls, 1 1 ; Massachusetts, 4. 
On May 2 Massachusetts was defeated by Millers 
Falls on their home grounds. But seven innings were 
played, the visitors having to leave to catch the train 
The diamond was a new one and in very poor condi- 
tion. Naturally the playing was ragged on both sides 
The principal feature of the game was Kennedy s 
pitching in the second inning. He struck out three 
men in succession with the bases filled. The score • 



25 



Totals. 

Two out when winning run was made 
Innings, 
Bates, 
Massachusetts, , 

Gregg' ^h^asV'nU-K^n^ ToW f 2 ' ""*." O^earn" Ha'rve^ 
Alle^i, Ceo"™ & b?.u ne K n !5~£ l, S n - S,olen *«*- 
by Towne 1 0. by CoS™' sESlffce M 5~!?h °° k ' A ^ n ' ■ Stmck out- 
play, Allen and (Dole^ Hit by niched Eii? k^t' Brcx * s2 - Double 
Passed bal,-H a n,,v . -nVp^-id^ ft™' r^I™!' Martin, Gregg. 



c, f. 



Austin out. hit by batted ball. 
,' 23456789 
10 12 2-6 
10 2 0-5 



in. 



PawHK.li u ,,"".°y P"cned balis— by Towne 

Passed ball-Harvey. Umpire- fedw. Conway, time I h'r., 4 

Colby, 1 1 ; Massachusetts. 5. 
In the game with Colby at Waterville last Satur- 
day Massachusetts found Coombs curves too difficult 
to solve and was easily defeated. Errors were made 
at costly times and materially assisted in piling up the 
score against the visitors. The pitching of Coombs 
and the batting of Vail were the interesting features 
of the game. The score : 



L. Maynard. I. f 
Thompson. 3b. 
Driscoll, 2b. 
Danphlnain, <• 
Wilder, lb. 
N. Maynard 
Leahy, r.f. 
Bushey, s.s. 
Elmer, p. 

Totals. 



Martin, s.s. 
Q'Hearn, 2b. 
Halligan. c. '. 
Harvey, c, 
Kennedy, p. 
Proulx. r. f. 
Brooks, 3b. 
Walker, lb. 
Greg e , I. f. 



MILLERS PALLS. 
A.B. R. 



4 
4 

5 

5 

4 

5 

4 

4 

4 



2 

2 



1 

2 

1 

I 

2 





39 II 

MASSACHUSETTS. 
A.B. R. 

I 
I 
I 






1 





4 
3 
2 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 



la. 
2 
2 
2 
1 
I 
I 
I 

3 
I 

14 



lH. 

2 

I 



I 

I 





I 

2 



P.O. 

I 

3 



7 

8 

I 

I 





21 



P.O. 



3 

3 





I 

1 

8 







1 
1 




3 
3 



A. 

2 
2 






4 





B. 
I 

I 











H. 

I 

I 






I 

I 






COLBY. 



Abbott, r.f. 
Coombs, p. 
Cowing, c. 
Vail, 2b. 
Bartlett.c.f. 
W. Teague, c.f. 
Keene, lb. 
Pugsiey, s.s. 
J. Teague, l.f. 
Craig, 3b. 

Totals. 



Martin, s.s. 
O'Hearn, 2b. 
Halligan, c.f. 
Harvey, c. 
Kennedy, p. 
Gr egg. l-f. 
Proulx, r.f. 
Brooke, 3b. 
Walker, lb. 

Totals, 

Innings, 
Colby, 
M.A. C, 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



IB. 



1 


2 

1 
I 


2 
1 







I 




1 



P.O. 


18 



8 

1 


27 



P.O. 

1 

I 

2 

10 

2 

2 
6 



A. 



I 

I 

4 






1 



1 




I 

5 




I 





Totals, an d . o 

Millers FiK 2 12 2 8 2 2- 

by Kennedy. L. Maynard, Driscoll (2) and^Danphiuain (2) Vim™-* hr ,' 



in|4, 
Keni 



5 

3 4 
I I 





24 

5 6 
3 4 





8 7 

8 6 
1 -II 
3 0-5 



Runs made— by Coombs 2, Cowin 
league, O'Hearn. Halligan 
Vail, O'Hearn. Three-te 
Coombs. Cowing 4 Vail 2 W Tm«» V ill... TTE "•"=»— ««do« ^ 



earn. H, a™." Kennedy.' Gregg.^^base'^i.s^ 

n^^V^VJ^™ 3 ' Van- S?6%n bas^-AbbSi, 2. 



0^^rJ^.^n $ p^^onclu$ion$ 

Is it worth while ? We are at a~loss~to~d^cideT 
As a matter of fact it is getting monotonous, this con- 
tinual haggling over apparently insignificant matters but 
which touches particularly a tender spot in the heart 
of each loyal son of Massachusetts. What ? Oh. 
this careless inattention of newspapers in the matter of 
the name of this college. Are we sensitive ? Per- 
haps. But it it is no mere childishness which urges 
us to remonstrate, it is rather a pride in the Mater 
from whom we derive our intellectual nourishment 
and whatever affects her interests detrimentally or 
beneficially, is in a manner reflected upon us. 

Why is it ? we ask. why is It that we are com- 
pelled to argue this matter so often ? Why is it the 
papers — and principally among them agricultural papers 
persist in slighting the official name of the college. 
Is it because the name is too long? Possibly. But 






*5* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






that does not justify the general admixture of names 
we continually meet. Is it for the purpose of being 
humorous or witty, or for satire and ridicule ? We 
know not and hope not. 

Or Is it because the grand old State of Massachu- 
setts is ashamed to acknowledge the legitimacy of this 
her younger child, Joseph. Let her remember 
that his day dreams may some day be realized and 
that she may be compelled to call upon his aid for 
sustenance and help in the time of her need. What- 
ever it is, it is a gross disregard of the customs of 
politeness and courtesy, and as such should receive the 
scantiest encouragement of the thoroughly well bred. 

The latest nom de plume of the college to which our 
attention has been called is the following, from the 
New England Farmer, AMHERST AGRICULTU- 
RAL SCHOOL. Alas, how have the mighty fallen. 
Ah, the worth of our day dreams. The lofty walls of 
our college hopes are blasted to the ground and we 
lay full exposed to the merciless, unpitying eyes of 
the world. 

Agricultural School '! So the truth is known at last. 
Well, it is too bad certainly, but we suppose it must be, 
still we can't help thinking how much more pleasant it 
would have been, if we could have continued for a 
short time longer under the name of a college. Now 
we shall have to cancel all athletic contests with real 
colleges and accept the advances of our brother pre- 
paratory schools and academies. 

These broad acres are but the abiding place, 
but the temporary home of a party of boys who are 
dabbling in mud pies and hoeing potatoes when they 
are not in the kindergarten or the head-master's 
advanced class. It Is but a school for the training of 
boys and girls under fifteen in the handicrafts of 
Mother Nature. The State should be informed that 
it is wasting its money in supposing that it is support- 
ing a College. It is too bad that this good old State 
should have been imposed upon, but then we are only 
children and of course are not wholly responsible for 
our actions. 

Another title which has been granted us is the 
"Amherst State College." Deliver us! Now the 
name of this institution does not include the name of 
State College, although that is what we are praying and 
hoping, it some time In the near future, will be called, 
for it is a State College. But. ye good people, is! 



153 



Amherst the whole state ? Now we would not dis- 
parage the merits of this good old town of Amherst 
our college home.for we all love it.and many are loath 
to leave when the time comes. Mother Nature and 
her children have taken great pains to make it a spot 
worthy to be loved and admired by all who are so fortu- 
nate as to visit here, and we are only too proud to link 
her name with ours when referring to Massachusetts, 
but one college already has that honor of including 
her name wholly in speaking of the college, while we 
are the product of the state. Certainly the College 
is located at once in naming it the Amherst State Col- 
lege. But when we speak of a state college we men- 
tion the state that stands as sponsor to the christen- 
ing and it seems to us thr.t Massachusetts is as grand 
a name as can be applied to any institution or organi- 
zation that stands for the principles it advocates and 
seeks to instill into the minds of its members a 
reverence for the memories she cherishes. 

Now come let us reason together Ye New England 
Farmer, and all other farmers and all who are inclined 
to be thoughtless when referring to the college they 
should respect. The Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege occupies a place of no little importance in the 
educational world. If the young men of this state and 
other states knew of the advantage possessed by Massa- 
chusetts for scientific training there would be few vacant 
places left in the college halls. But when they read 
of the Amherst Agricultural School, do you think it 
likely they would have any great desire to come here. 
For our own part we would not decidedly. We believe 
that more harm is wrought by the papers in their care- 
less inattention to the matter than from any other 
source. Now come, respect the college that seeks the 
best interest of the state and take a pride in her 
advancement. If the full title Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural Ccllege is too long to suit your purpose, remem- 
ber the state from which she takes her name and 
honor and respect Massachusetts. 

NOTICE. 

We must have a large amount of money to finish 
out the year. All subscribers still owing for the cur- 
rent year will greatly oblige the manager by settling 
immediately. 

^ 

The Wesleyan Summer school will not be held this 
coming season. 



BRYANT'S THANATOPSIS. 

A rustle of leaves ; a forest breath heavy with the 
odors of pine and hemlock ; a burst of sunlight on 
mountain, field and glen ; a song of gladness from the 
trees and the sky ; a solemn procession through the 
valley ; a glorious sunset ; darkness, silence, and then 
rest. So the vision seems to pass before the poet's 
mind. 

Sustained in its imagery and majesty of expres- 
sion ; lofty in its conception of a truth ; realistic in its 
descriptions of Nature, Thanatopsls still ranks as one 
of the highest and most elevated types of our serious 
poetry. To us of this time, one hundred years from 
its birth, it stands out as one of the most remarkable 
productions ever conceived in so young a mind ; not 
simply from its beauty of construction but for the 
wealth of serious thought it contains. 

The theme of the poem is "a view of Death," as 
the title a Greek compound— Thanat. death, and 
opsis, a view— suggests. But it is a view of Death 
in which the poet, with Nature for a guide, has over- 
stepped theological bounds and wandered far to the 
hilltops, where he beheld the vision. It is not death 
with its terror, it is not sleep with an awakening and 
reward, it is but a sweeter echo of •• dust thou art, to 
dust thou shalt return." It breathes no inspiring 
promise of a glorious future ; it depicts no tortures for 
the thoughtless life ; but it does present a picture of 
tranquility and rest. Its philosophy is cheering to the 
lone and the poor, — 



" Yet not to thine eternal resting-place 
Shalt thou retire alone, nor couldst thou wish 
Couch more magnificent. Thou shalt lie down 
With patriarchs of the infant world— with kings. 
The powerful of the earth— the wise, the good. 
Fair forms and hoary seers of ages past. 
All in one mighty sepulchre." 

but not comforting to the downcast and weary 
hearted ; the heart still yearns for an assuring solace 
of its pain, and grief. Yet how truly pictured is the 
scene, 

" if thou withdraw 
In silence from the living, and no friend 
Take not* of thy departure? " 

One almost hears the words of Gray repeated and 
how well they follow in the theme, 

" Perhaps, in this neglected spot is laid 

Some heart once pregnant with celestial fire ; 
Hands that the rod of empire might have swayed, 
Or waked to ecstasy the living lyre." 

And while the poet continues in his sweetest voice 
of comfort and cheer, 

1 



Full many a gem, of purest ray serene. 
The dark unfathomed caves of ocean bear ; 
Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, 
And waste its sweetness on the desert air." 
Bryant's stoical philosophy braces the heart against 
the sombre thoughts that would depress ; and tells us 
that 

...... , . " All that breathe 

Will share thy destiny. The gay will laugh 
When thou art gone, the solemn brood of care 
Plod on. and each one as before will chase 
His favorite phantom ; yet all these shall leave 
Their mirth and their employments, and shall come 
And make their bed with thee " 

So natural and reasonable does Death appear to 

the young poet, that one almost feels the poem to 

have been suggested by those words of Swift : - It is 

impossible that anything so natural, so necessary and 

so universal as death should ever have been designed 

by Providence as an evil to mankind." But it was 

probably his own great love for and companionship 

with Nature that gave birth to the thoughts. One 

can picture him during some trying hour, when all 

was sad and silent within, 

" Go forth, under the open sky, and list 
To Nature's teachings," 

and return with renewed strength. 

" Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife," 
he truly was upon those hills In his early home. In 
those " wild solitudes " he found a company that was 
the inspiration of his genius. The very atmosphere 
of those magnificent hills awakens one to noble aspi- 
rations. One can picture him as he stands upon his 
porch and gazes out where 

"Afar, 
The village with its spires, the path of streams 
And dim receding valleys, had before 
By interposing trees, lay visible 
Through the bare grove," 

inspires him with that sublime description. 

"The hills 
Rock ribbed and ancient as the sun,— the vales 
Stretching in pensive quietness between ; 
The venerable woods— rivers that move 
In majesty, and the complaining brooks 
That make the meadows green ; " 

And then with his mind's eye he looks farther away 

beyond the intervening hills where the rising tide 

breaks with a solemn moan upon the pebbly shore 

and continues with a burst of eloquence and grandeur. 

" and, poured round all, 
Old Ocean's gray and melancholy waste," 

These, the wonders and magnificence of Nature, 
monuments of the eternal ages, these 

" Are but the solemn decorations all 
Of the great tomb of man." 



154 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



What more could finite man desire than these the 
emblems of infinity, to mark his resting place. And 
finally rising by tone to tone, he ends with an har- 
monious swell of full organ into those words which 
will never be forgotten as long as there lives a soul to 
voice their inspiring echoes : 

" So live, that when thy summons comes to join 
The innumerable caravan, which moves 
To that mysterious realm, where each shall take 
His chamber in the silent halls of death. 
Thou go not. like the quarry slave at night 
Scourged to his dungeon, but. sustained and soothed 
By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave, 
Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch 
About him and lies down to pleasant dreams." 



INFORMAL. 

The last informal dance of the college year will be 
held Friday afternoon and evening, May 15, from 5 to 
9 p. m. " Warner and some other fellers will play 
rag-time and any other old kind of time " 
the notice on the bulletin board says. These 
informals have been, in the past, the most enlivening 
of all our social gatherings, and those who have at- 
tended have been well repaid for the little outlay of 
time, etc. they have given to it. The committee in 
charge of the dances have stated that the receipts are 
a trifle behind the expenditures, not enough to cause 
any embarrassment, but a sum that can be easily 
lifted by a few more attending. Now let this last one 
eclipse all the others. Every fellow who dances or 
who can hop In time to music — for we have seen 
some who have done no more than this, and they had 
a good time — should attend, and all who do neither, 
come up in the gallery and lend your presence, and 
pocketbook, to the occasion and make it a success 
both socially and financially. 



COMMENCEMENT ORATIONS. 

The following men have been chosen to represent 
the junior class at Commencement : Couden, Gregg, 
Griffin, O'Hearn, Peck and Raymoth. 

The preliminary speaking for the Burnham Four 
will take place Tuesday, May 19, at 1-00 p. m. and 
includes the following members of the sophomore and 
freshman classes : Adams, Allen. Bartlett, Craig- 
head, Hutchings, Lyman, Swain and Walker of 1905, 
and Carpenter, Farrar, Hayward, Martin, Peakes, 
Raclcot, Shannon, Taft, Tannat and White of 1906. 



FOOTBALL REPORT. 




Season, 1902. 






Receipts, 




Subscription from 


college. 


$371.50 


Guarantees : 






Holy Cross, 




60.00 


Dartmouth, 




150.00 


Wesleyan, 




70.00 


Tufts. 




100.00 


Amherst, 




100.00 


Gate receipts, 




28.50 


Prof. Smith, 




3.00 




Expenses. 




Old accounts : 






To baseball association, 


78.00 


Supplies : 






H. R. Adams, 




7.90 


Wright & Ditson, 


7.16 


J. W. Brine, 




72.00 


Co-op store, 




12.18 


Jenning straps, 




3.20 


Repairs : 






Davis, 




9.15 


Coach : 






Jennings, 




100.00 


Car fares. 




18.22 


Rubbers : 






Willis, '05, 




7.00 


Guarantees : 






Boston College, 




85.00 


W. P. 1. 




60.00 


Trips : 






Holy Cross, 




71.00 


Dartmouth, 




141.65 


Wesleyan, 




78.90 


Amherst, 




18.00 


Tufts. 




107.75 


Incidentals : 






Express, 




1.40 


Stationery and s 


tamps, 


2.40 


Dr. Rawson, 




2.00 


Dr. Branch, 




2.50 


Telegrams, 




1.95 


Medicine, 




3.15 


Shin guards, 




50 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'55 



$891.01 



Net loss. 



$8.01 



Respectfully submitted. 

Phillip W. Brooks, Mgr. 
PerG. 



Collet fJot*$. 



—A committee from the state legislature will visit 
the college on May 15. 

—Trout fishing has been indulged in to quite an 
extent by some of the students this spring. Some 
very good catches have been made. 

— Capt. Ahearn has been forced to give up base bail 
on account of a broken arm. Halligan. '03, has been 
elected captain of the team for the remainder of the 
season. 

—The following promotions have been made in the 
batallion: Yeaw '05 to be corporal, Gay '04 to be 
armorer. Halligan '03 to be drum major, and Griffin 
'04 to be Sergeant. 

—A committee composed of Professors Stone. 
Fernald, Babson, Wellington and Ostrander has been 
appointed from the faculty to aid next year's 
Juniors and Seniors in electing their courses. 

—The construction of a new road from town to the 
college Is being contemplated. This road will run 
almost parallel to Lincoln Avenue passing in the rear 
of the D. G. K. House, the Veterinary Laboratory and 
South College. 

— Yesterday the sophomore class in agriculture, 
accompanied by Prof. Brooks, took a barge ride through 
Sunderland, Leverett and North Hadley in order to 
study the different kinds of soils and the agencies by 
which they were formed. 

—The department of Landscape Gardening has 
completed and submitted to the town officials plans for 
converting the Sweetser estate, which is situated near 
the center of the town between Lessey and Main 
streets, into a public park. This estate was donated 
to the town a few months ago. 

— At the invitation of the trustees of the college, the 
faculty met with the trustees for a joint meeting on the 
evening of April 29. The meeting was held in the 
Dining Hall which was tastefully decorated with potted 
plants from the green-house. After the business was 
transacted refreshments were served by steward 
Naylor. 



the Agricultural college for the preparation of vaccine 
matter for use in compulsory vaccination. The college 
is equipped with a fine veterinary department under 
the direction of Prof. James B. Paige, D. V. S. 
There is a laboratory already built and stables have 
been fitted up for the keeping of cattle for veterinary 
purposes. If the State is to undertake the business of 
preparing vaccice matter, surely its own college is the 
proper place in which to do the work. This is the 
verdict of the committee to whom ail matters relating 
to public health are referred by the Legislature. This 
committee will accompany the committee on agricul- 
ture, on education and on military affairs on their 
annual visit to the Agricultural college which will take 
place next Thursday and Friday. This inspection will 
afford Prof. Paige, himself a member of the Legisla- 
ture and of the committee on public health, opportun- 
ity to show his fellow legislators the wisdom of the 
recommendation of the committee. 

The 44 members of these committees with their 
messengers, the other members of the Legislature 
who will accompany them and invited guests, ladles 
not infrequently joining the party, taken all together, 
make up a goodly company which the street railway 
company, the Amherst House, the college and the 
town are greatly pleased to entertain. President 
Goodell will give them a reception Thursday evening 
at Draper hall, where they will meet the faculty and 
members of the families of the professors. The whole 
college will be inspected in all of Its departments and 
the places of interest in town will be shown. These 
annual visits of so large a delegation from the Legisla- 
ture have beer, of great benefit to the college, to the 
town, and to the legislators themselves. " 



VACCINE LABORATORY. 

We note the following from the Springfield Union :— 

* The committee on public health has recommended 

to the Legislature the establishment of a laboratory at 



An athletic fraternity to have chapters at practi- 
cally every American university, has been founded at 
the University of Iowa. The purpose of the fraternity 
will be to spread a bond of common brotherhood 
among those who have taken part and are Interested 
in American college athletics, to assist the athletic 
authorities of each university where a chapter of the 
fraternity is located In conducting athletics, and to 
promote social and fraternal Intercourse among the 
members of the fraternity. Membership in each 
chapter will be limited to those granted the right to 
wear the 'varsity initial or emblem of the university 
in question, 






'56 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Dep&rtmtrvf ^lotfs. 






The new agricultural laboratory will be a great boon 
to the study of agriculture in this college, although by 
no means an ideal solution of the problem, it makes a 
great advance in the right direction. 

Since the erection of the heating station, the boil- 
ers in South college are no longer needed. They are 
to be taken out and their place occupied by the hose 
carriage and other fire implements now in the base- 
ment of the north wing of the building. The material 
stored beneath the agricultural lecture room will be re- 
moved to the old coal room. There will then be avail- 
able for the laboratory, a large, well lighted room. 

The laboratory will be equipped for work in soil phy- 
sics in particular. There will be benches and a com- 
plete line of apparatus for making tests of soils. The 
equipment will be similar to that used in the Colum- 
bus School of Agriculture. In fact, Prof. Brooks has 
already secured several of the instruments used there, 
and hopes to obtain more. There will be compound 
microscopes and a water motor with centrifuge for 
work in mechanical soil analysis, and simple micro- 
scopes for testing seeds for impurities and adultera- 
tions. Another part of the laboratory will contain ap- 
paratus for testing the germinating power of seeds, 
etc. 

There will also be instruments for drainage work, 
transit. Y level, tape, poles, etc. Tiles to be laid by 
the students, are to be furnished by special appropria- 
tion. Problems In drainage will be assigned the stu- 
dents by way of laboratory work. The men will be 
expected to do only enough of the rough digging to 
realize what it is and what it will cost. For the most 
part, they will do the fine work ; the mapping, leveling, 
and laying. 

With such equipment the students will have abun- 
dant opportunity for testing soils in relation to water 
capillarity, water evaporation, seed testing and other 
problems both theoretical and practical. 

In planning the laboratory, Prof. Brooks aims to 
have all the furnishings of the highest grade. Every 
thing will be movable so that the apparatus can easily 
be taken out when a better creation is furnished. 
• * * * # 

A course in Poultry farming has been offered the 
members of the junior class who are to elect agrlcul- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ture. The course will consist of lectures, the study of 
poultry bulletins, and practical work, At present the 
class is studying the management of incubators, 
Prof. Brooks has placed this part of the course on a 
money making basis. Six of the station incubators 
have been placed at the disposal of the class. The 
men are to buy enough eggs to fill them and then take 
entire charge of the Incubating process until they hatch. 
At this time Prof. Brooks will buy all the chickens 
which hatch at the rate of ten cents per capita. As 
eggs are only fifteen cents a dozen and each incubator 
holds two hundred and forty eggs, the class expects to 
make enough from this investment to pay next year's 
expenses. 

***** 

" A List of North American Lepidoptera. "edited by 
Harrison G. Dyar. Ph. D., custodian of Lepidoptera, 
United States National Museum, assisted by C. H. 
Fernald, Ph. D., the late Rev. George D. Hulst, and 
August Busk. This is one of the most important 
recent publications of the Smithsonian Institution. 
The work Is an extremely valuable one, and will be 
found most useful. The bulletin contains 723 pages 
and lists 6623 butterflies and moths. 

Prof. C. H. Fernald of this college, a well-known 
authority on Microlepidoptera. furnished the manu- 
script for the families Pterophoridae and Torticidae, 
besides that for the sub-families Pyraestinae, Nym- 
phulinae, Scopariinae, Pyrallnae, Chrysauginae, and 
Schoenobinae of the family Pyralidae. Prof. Fernald 
has described nearly one hundred species and several 
genera in these families. 

***** 

It will be remembered that last year the legislature 
appropriated a sum of money to be expended in com- 
bating the San Jose scale with which many of our 
orchard trees were badly infested. Of the numerous 
insecticides used, the best results were obtained with 
the lime, sulphur and salt wash. 

As this wash is now recognized as one of the best 
treatments for the scale, Dr. Fernald is trying to 
determine, by experiment, whether or not all the com- 
pounds present in the solution are of insecticidal value 
with a view to eliminating those which are not. With 
this end Dr. Wellington has made an analysis of the 
wash and has determined the various compounds and 
what percentage of each is present in the wash as 



applied. He has also manufactured the most import- 
ant products of his analysis independent of each other 
Trees have been sprayed with these and it remains to 
be found out which are of value in combating the 
insect. 

Should it be found that any of these compounds can 
be eliminated without impairing the value of the 
insecticide. Dr. Fernald hopes to secure a cheaper and 
much less disagreeable substance. 

***** 
The horticultural department has started several 
pruning experiments in Clark orchard which will be 
watched with interest as the season advances. 

A renewal experiment aims to arrive at the best 
method for renewing the bearing portion of the tree by 
three different modes of pruning. In plot a as little 
pruning will be done as possible ; the cross limbs alone 
being removed. The braches will be headed in plot 
but no summer pruning will take place. The trees 
in plot c will be treated as those in plot b but will be 
subject to careful summer pruning in early June to 
stop excessive growth. Another set of experiments 
are to illustrate summer pruning. This experiment 
also contains three plots. In plot a only light summer 
pruning will be practiced in June toward the end of 
the growing season. Heavy summer pruning will be 
carried on in plot b. These trees will be pruned twice 
once in May to stop vigorous shoots, and again in June 
when all strong shoots will be headed back and as 
many as practicable of the young and weaker growths. 
Plot c will illustrate stopping vs. side pruning in 
summer. 

There are also experiments in root pruning to 
determine to what extent this increases the productive- 
ness of a tree. 



All! 



mm. 



The enthusiastic loyalty and substantial interest 
shown by our western alumni in their Alma Mater is 
greatly to be commended. We trust that the move- 
ment thus started will meet the support of every 
alumnus and continue to do so until the athletic in- 
terests of Massachusetts will be on a par with the 
best of New England's minor colleges. 

75. — On Thursday afternoon, May 7, Prof. W. P. 
Brooks delivered a lecture before the Hadley Pomona 



Grange on the subject, -What the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College has done for the farmers of 
Massachusetts." 

78.— C. 0. Lovell has been in town several days 
recently, helping to arrange the affairs of his father 
photographer Lovell, well known to many college 
classes. Mr. C. O. Lovell is just now interested in 
bringing out an entirely new style of photographic 
paper and one which promises to have great popularity. 

•81.— W. F. Carr. who for some time was with the 
West Chicago Street R. R. Co. is now situated in 
Milwaukee. Wis., as chief engineer •< the Folk Co. 

'81.— Dr. Austin Peters has been re-elected to 
the Mass. State Board of Agriculture as cattle In- 
spector for the state. 

•87— Wm. H. Caldwell, secretary and treasurer 
of the American Guernsey Cattle Club of Petersboro, 
N. H., sent a notice to the Signal with reference to 
a Guernsey heifer, that has produced 453 86 lbs. of 
butter fat in one year, the largest official butter fat 
record of a two-year old heifer in the world. 

Ex-'92.— F. A. Farrer, president F. T. Blish Hard- 
ware Co., South Manchester, Conn. 

'95.— Clarence B. Lane, assistant in Dairy Hus- 
bandry at the New Jersey Experiment station has just 
submitted his annual report. The report covers about 
forty paged of printed matter and is Illustrated with 
nine half tones. 

'95.— At the annual meeting of the association 
known as the " Pacific Northwest Economic Ento- 
mologists," held in Spokane, Washington, Prof. Robert 
A. Cooley of Montana gave an address on the spread 
of Insects In the northwest, paying special attention to 
the question of the Codling Moth. He also spoke be- 
fore the Northwest Fruit Growers' Association, held 
in Spokane about the same time on " The Preventa- 
tion of Small Losses by Insects. 

'95.— A new book on " How to Make School Gar- 
dens " will be published shortly by Doubleday, Page 
& Co. of New York. The author is Mr. H. D. Hem- 
enway, director of the School of Horticulture. Hart- 
ford Handicraft Schools. Mr. Hemenway has made 
a distinct success of the school garden idea In Hart- 
ford and Is now looked upon as an authority in that 
line. 



x 5 8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'96, — S. W. Fletcher, horticulturist of the State 
Experiment station, Morgantown, West Virginia. 

Ex-'97. — Charles A. Raulett, superintendent Bethel 
Military Academy, Bethel, Virginia. 

'99. — D. H. Beaman is now engaged as an instruc- 
tor at the School of Horticulture, which is a depart- 
ment of the Handicraft Schools of Hartford. 

'99-'01. — At the last meeting of the Association of 
Economic Entomologists in Washington, Dr. W. E. 
Hinds, '99, was elected an active member and R. I. 
Smith, '01, an associate member. 

'00. — J. E. Halligan of the Hatch Experiment Sta- 
tion has just returned from his collecting tour, having 
completed the collection of feed samples for the year. 

'02. — H. E. Hodgkiss, who fo. some time has been 
pursuing post graduate studies in College, has been 
called home on account of the illness of his father. 

Ex-'05. — C. M. Carter, Instructor Dr. Brown's 
Institute, Barre. Mass. 

Report of the annual meeting of the Western 
Alumni Association held at the Sherman House, 
March 21, 1903. 



S pring Clothes . 

.lust the sorts that young men will appreciate. 
There's a collection here that absolutely cannot 
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Will you come and see it? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 

Haynes & Co., 



Springfield, 



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VESTIBULE 
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THROUGH COACHES 



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SLEEPINQ CARS 



DINING CARS 



EXPRESS 


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TO AND FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER 


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fc.M. 6.02 P.M. 


It. Amherst 


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ar. Boston 


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For further Information, time tables, etc., call on ticket agents or address, A. S. HAN80N, Q. P. A., Boston, Masa. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



/. 



The Western Alumni Association held a very suc- 
cessful reunion this year at Chicago, III. There were 
sixteen alumni present, the largest number present at 
any reunion of the Association. 

The following officers were re-elected ; Pres't. E. 
B. Bragg. 75 ; vice pres't. A. F. Shiverick. '82 ; 
sec'yand treas.. A. B. Smith. '95; trustees. G S 
Plumb. '82 ; J. E. Wilder. '82; C. W. Smith. '93 • 
• M. Wright. '99; J. L. Field, '92. 
After transacting the necessary routine business, 
the association listened to a report of the Athletic 
Field Association. It was shown that through the ef- 
forts of the Western Alumni over $250 had been 
pledged toward the athletic field. It seemed to be 
the unanimous feeling among those present that the 
field should be located on the College grounds thereby 
saving a greater portion of the expense. The con- 
sensus of opinion seemed to be in favor of a site east 
of the North Amherst road between Lovers' Lane 
and the Experiment Station. 

After partaking of a bountiful banquet the members 
spent the remainder of the evening socially, renewing 
old acquaintances and recalling pleasant days spent at 
M. A. C. Those present were: E. B. Bragg. 75- 
J. E. Wilder, '82, A. F. Shiverick, '82. T. P. Foley! 
'95. Lewis H. Nichols. 71, J. L. Field, '92 H J 
Armstrong. '97, C. E. Dwyer, '02, E. S. Gamwell 
•01, A. B. Smith, "95. M. H. Munson. '00 P W 
Brooks. '01, E. M. Wright. '99, W. E. Stone '82 
E. G. Howe, 72. 

The secretary wishes to ask that any change of ad- 
dress of alumni in the Western territory be sent to 
him ; and If any new men coming into the territory 
would send their addresses to him also, they would 
aid him in his work. 

Arthur B. Smith, Sec'y, 

544 Winnemac Ave.. 
Chicago, III. 



toy 



totheFARM 



: T -^- : 



f 



■ i" ■ a the old furm |.-, V 
U D« terms the fuim in il, 
niodcrn way. 

i Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

Gaughl by Mall. 

A tlKuoiik-li and practical course, 
under the threcl charge i l Win r 
grooka, Ph. ii,. (Massachusetts Ag- 
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<" tsol soils. ptanta. tillage, drain- 
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crop rotation and everything pet- 
ti inlng to inun.-i i,,;,ki„ k . ,,„ ,)„, 
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Club and College Tins and Kings. 
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Dlamands, WatcheB, Jewelry. 



lnttrco.l>gi«vte. 



The April number of the Educational Review has 
an article on -accidents from College football" by- 
Prof. E. G. Dexter, head of the department of educa- 
tion in the University of Illinois. Below is the summary 
of his articles. 

I. About one college man in ten, the country over 
plays football. 



"UP TO IHE MINUTE" 



IN 



MEN'S FINE SHOES, 
Tbe Northampton Shoe Go. 



88 Main St., 



J 
Northampton, Mass 






i6o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









■ 



2. About twice as large a proportion of the men 
in the small colleges play the game, as in the large. 

3. The proportion of men playing seems to be 
slightly decreasing. 

4. About one player in thirty-five is sufficiently in- 
jnred each season to necessitate loss of time from 
college duties. 

5. The number of college football players who are 
permanently injured or die from the effects of the 
game is so small as to be practically a negligible 
quantity. 

6. College football is adequately supervised in 
nearly all the institutions. 

7. The opinions of college officers regarding the 
value of the game are roughly 17 to 1 in favor (weigh- 
ed in terms of enrolment.) 

8. The newspaper reports of injuries to college 
football players seem to be grossly exaggerated. Not 
so much so in the cases of players upon other teams, 

9. Accident insurance statistics would lead us to 
believe that many other forms of sport are more dan- 
gerous than football. 



A good opportunity for two young men 
to learn how to 

RAISE AND SELL VEGETABLES 

so that each acre tilled may be made to 
return from $500 to $1/500. 



Write or call on H. M. HOWARD, 

284 Fuller St,., West Newton, Mass. 




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If. r.Ctty, will stmt you any of these fioohs sut>. 
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Henry R. Johnson, 

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PHARMACIST. 
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Pure Drugs and Medicines, 



FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
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MEERSCHAUM AND I'.RIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
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Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night call , responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 




PHOTOGKAPMER, 

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102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MA8S. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JUNE 3, 1903 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute Communications should be addressed. Collbob Sional, Ammbsst Mass T„. Siomal will b. 
ZJX^ZZZZ:. * ■——»—-— —I- Subscribe,, .ho do no, SJ^g^iTZS t 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904. Editor-In Chief. 
HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. 1904. Business Manager. 
GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN, 1905, Assistant Business Manager 

ARTHL T R\ D EfpEc2 N 19 C O 4 U ?f ' !2L FRANK FARLEY ETCHINGS. ,905. Alumni Notes, 

tol.—.? 3 ' ' lnterco ' le B lat «- JOHN FRANKLIN LYMAN. 1905, College Notes 

ERNEST ADNA BACK. 1 904, Department Notes. ALLAN DANA FARRAR 1 906 

HERBERT HAROLD COODENOUGH, 1905, Athletics. RALPH WARE PEAKES, 1906. 



Terms, »1.00 per year In adoanco. Single Coplea, IQc. Postago outaldo of United States and Canada, 18c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association. 
College Senate, 
Readlr.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

A. W. Gilbert, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. H. Griffin, Manager. Base Ball Association, 

E. B. Snell, Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Five Index. 

A. W. Gilbert, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. S. F. HowarJ. Sec. 
J. G. Cook, Manager. 
B. Tupper, Manager. 
G. L. Barrus, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Pest Office at Amherst. 

l»\UWU% S, MMMMA* »%\a.i%%». 



Editorials. 



It Is hardly necessary to say anything in regard to 
the condition of the pond. But we hope the perpe- 
trators of the deed are fully satisfied with their work, 
and we would suggest that they be given a special 
course in landscape gardening. Perhaps they could 
make quite a stir In this sphere of the world's ac- 
tivity, for certainly their ideas of the beautiful are 
unique, to say the least. We trust they will have 
many friends here at Commencement to view the 
result of their labors. 



An Exchange column, in which the various college 
periodicals should be candidly criticized with more 
than a perfunctory notice, as uusually fond In this de- 
partment, as proposed at the N. E. I. P. A. conven- 
tion, would be a splendid thing. A criticism that 
should be fair and helpful. In consequence of the 
fact that It would be almost impossible to attend 
faithfully to all the college magazines, it was proposed 
to limit the department in the exchange of ideas and I 



criticism to the members of the N. E. 1. P. A. The 
advantage of such a department can be readily ap- 
preciated, though perhaps it would require some little 
work in carrying out the idea. It would unite the 
colleges concerned in a closer band of fellowship, and 
strengthen all — the older and more experienced papers 
aiding in building up the younger, and placing them 
on a firmer footing in the college literary world. 
There is too little mingling of interests among the 
New England Colleges, though there are Leagues 
combining two or three, and in athletics we come in 
contact with our sister colleges from time to time, yet 
on the whole we know very little about one another. 
An Exchange column rightly used, as proposed, would 
awaken an interest, and produce a better feeling of 
comradeship. Let us hops something of the sort can 
be tried and carried out successfully. 



As last week was the one hundredth anniversary of 
Ralph Waldo Emerson's birth, It was but natural that 
New England, and particularly Boston, Concord, and 
nearby towns should hold special commemorative 



l62 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






■ 

g . 

In 



services In his honor. As an editorial in one of 
the Boston papers states : " The century marked 
by the birth of Ralph Waldo Emerson began with 
Old Theology strongly enthroned. It ends with 
Reason supplanting Dogma and Understanding 
crowding out Emotionalism. It has brought forth 
less church but more religion, less creed but 
more life, less letter but more spirit. Mr. Emerson 
did his share toward fhdicating the emancipation of 
the race through the eternal progress of spiritual pro- 
gress. Because Mr. Emerson was philosopher, sage 
and poet, his centennial is celebrated to-day. Be- 
cause he was an inspired preacher of the ideal as the 
only perpetually real, Mr. Emerson is understood to- 
day as he never was during his lifetime." Emerson 
seems to stand far off in the horizon of a great many 
readers. His mysticism can not be comprehended 
with a casual reading. Only as one delves into the 
great Library which he finds open to him, is he able 
in any manner to comprehend this " Lover of Truth." 
As President Eliot of Harvard said at the meeting in 
Symphony Hall : "As a young man I found the 
writings of Emerson unattractive and not seldom un- 
intelligible, but when I had got at what proved to be 
my lifework for education I discovered in Emerson's 
poems and essays all the fundamental motives and 
principles of my own hourly struggle against educa- 
tional routine and tradition, and against the prevailing 
notions of discipline for the young." His thought is 
full and deep and rich ; he has made every word count 
for something. "Far in advance of his age," as 
President Eliot said, his words still ring with the pro- 
phetic spirit in which they were written, spurring men 
on to a higher plane of nobler attempt and grander 
achievement. And if we hitch our wagon to a star, 
though we are sure to lose it. yet in our attempt to 
regain it we shall rise to higher realms in the intel- 
lectual Universe and rest satisfied that we have done 
well. 



THE NEW ENGLAND INTERCOLLEGIATE 

PRESS ASSOCIATION CONVENTION. 

The N. E. I. P. Association held its annual conven- 
tion and banquet Monday, May 25, 1903, at the Cop- 
ley Square Hotel, Boston, Mass., Mr. L. L. Palmer of 
Wesleyan Lit,, president of the association, occupied 



the chair. Representatives from the following col- 
leges were present ; Wesleyan, Bowdoin, Boston uni- 
versity. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Welles- 
ley. Norwich University, Holy Cross, Tufts, Amherst 
and Massachusetts. 

The afternoon session was opened at 3-30. Presi- 
dent Palmer started the discussion by suggesting some 
of the advantages of an Exchange column in which 
the various college periodicals should be candidly crit- 
icized, with more than a perfunctory notice as usually 
found in this department, Other questions discussed 
were : The College weekly newspaper and monthly 
literary magazine and their problems ; harmonious 
action of editors and business managers ; contributions 
to the paper and how to secure them, in which the 
Wellesley representatives startled the convention by 
stating that it was a law that no members of the 
board of editors was allowed to contribute to the mag- 
azine except on special occasions. If such were the 
rule everywhere, we fear there would be very few col- 
lege papers published ; and yet to make a paper dis- 
tinctly representative, that is the only way, 1. e. to 
have the College write the articles. The afternoon 
session was very helpful in the suggestions offered and 
advice given. The mingling of college interests is 
one of the things to be hoped for, and we trust the 
association can continue growing stronger each year 
and more firmly binding college to college until all the 
New England colleges shall be as one strong bulwark 
of education. 

The banquet in the evening was the enlivening feat- 
ure of the convention, and though time was short.each 
member responded to a toast on the suggestion of the 
toastmaster, L. L. Palmer, in the interests of the col- 
lege paper and its future. 

The new officers of the association are : Pres't. 
Ralph W. Keeler, Wesleyan Lit.; vice pres't. Miss 
Clara Stanton More. Wellesley Magazine; secy, and 
treas., Wm. T. Rowe, Bowdoin Orient; fourth on the 
executive committee, Roland B. Pendergast, The Tech. 
Praise is due Secy. Clement F. Robinson. Bowdoin 
Orient Sot the work he has done the past year in stirring 
up a new Interest among the colleges to carry on the 
work of the association. Let us hope the coming year 
will find the association on firmer footing, and all the 
colleges in closer touch with one another, each seeking 
the advantages of the other. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




MANILA AND THE PHILIPPINES 

Capt. James A. Shipton gave a very interesting 
talk on his experiences in the Philippines, Thursday 
evening. May 28. in the Chapel. He anticipated no 
such audience as greeted him. he said, but rather 
expected only a few with whom he should have an 
evening chat. He stated that he was no lecturer, but 
if an approving enthusiasm stirred up in an audience 
is an evidence that the speaker has pleased, Captain 
Shipton may rest assured that his talk was enjoyed. 
He began by telling of a volcano, with which he was 
acquainted and which occupied a prominent position 
in his back yard. He told of the tribes living on the 
side of the mountain who had spent their lives there, 
never venturing into the lower villages, until an erup- 
tion caused a panic among them, or when they came 
down to help drive the Americans off the island. Their 
language being so entirely different from that of the 
other people of the surrounding country, when any 
were found in the towns, no one could understand or 
speak to them. 

Rice and small potatoes form the principal food, 
and are usually eaten from a large banana leaf, to 
which each helps himself from one central mess. 
The bolo is their farming implement as well as 
weapon, and is made from any piece of iron they are 
lucky enough to find. It is in the shape of a sword, 
the weapon usually having a guard for the hand. The 
bamboo is the material from which everything is made 
from a spear to a house. The growing of hemp is the 
chief Industry ; and he described the means by which 
the hemp fibre is obtained and cared for and woven 
into various materials. It is the duty of the women 
to attend to the work about the house, the men hav- 
ing all they can do to watch the cock-fights, and lose 
all or win all, for the Filipino bets all he has with him 
and not a part ; if he loses he cheerfully picks up his 
dead bird and leaves for home, trusting in better luck 
another time. 

The Captain spoke of the superstition abounding 
among the natives and of the use made of it by the 
priests and others in authority, against the Americans. 
He told of the treachery of the natives and how diffi- 
cult it was to remain patient and refrain from attempt- 
ing something violent. Manila, he said, was one of 
the finest examples in the world of a walled town, 
though of late the wall along the Pasig river had been 



removed in order to build more docks for the accom- 
modations of the ocean steamers. He amused the 
audience with an account of the first ball he held 
there. In which his guests came at 12 o'clock, noon, 
and remained with him 36 hours, eating, dancing, and 
sleeping, as they were inclined. Altogether tha life 
at present in the Philippines is one of continued 
activity and a continual round of pleasure, despite the 
fact that a petty warfare is being waged at all times; 
and it is safe to say that when the Filipino shall be 
taught to respect the American and when he fully 
understands the motive of America in regard to his 
interests, he will be in a position to be a factor for 
influence in the world. 



BURNHAM FOUR. 

The preliminaries in the Burnham prize decla- 
mations occurred Tuesday, May 26. The following 
men were chosen to speak in the finals June 15: 
Sophomores— G. H. Allen. Somarville ; F. A. Bart 
lett. Belchertown ; W. H. Craighead. Boston ; F. F. 
Hutchins, South Amherst. Alternates, J. F. Lyman, 
Amherst; A. N. Swain. New Dorchester. Fresh- 
men—A. D. Farrar, Amherst ; A. S. Hayward, 
South Amherst; A. H. Shannon. Worcester; V. O. 
White. Attleboro. Alternates. W. O. Taft. East 
Pepperell ; W. C. Tannatt, Dorchester. 



Obs?r\?ationsr^£onclusions 



OBSERVATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS. 

The Observer has heard that there are complaints 
because certain persons whom he has criticised in 
these columns have had no opportunity to answer 
such criticism ; and furthermore that he has given 
the same aggrieved parties no chance to retaliate. 
As to the first complaint it ought to be enough to say 
that the columns of the Signal in general, if not the 
Observer's column in particular, are open to all who 
care to take advantage of their privilege ; and the 
Observer has not the authori.y, even If he had the 
will, to change the policy of the paper in that or 
another respect. To those who are seeking the 
opportunity of criticising his ovn shortcomings, the 
Observer submits that it is not customary for even 
greater men than himself to scatter such opportuni- 
ties broadcast. To lend a little excitemanf and nov - 



1 6 4 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



elty to the discussion, however, the Observer will 
throw open his column in the next, the Commence- 
ment number of the Signal, to any and all who have 
It In mind to cast slurs on his Individual integrity, or 
other honorable and good qualities which he might be 
supposed to possess. If necessary the issue will be 
enlarged at the Observer's expense, so that all may 
have an equal chance to express their opinion. Thus 
the generous and high-minded Observer— see above 
for confirmation of this title— cannot be accused of 
publishing only such charges as might be easily 
refuted. 

***** 

There was a considerable discussion of the Co-ed 
problem, it is understood, at the annual dinner of the 
Trustees held at the college a few weeks since : and 
it may not be long before it will be a serious question 
for the State Legislature to decide what shall be done 
with those daughters of the Commonwealth whose 
ambition it is to become practical farmers or their 
wives. The Observer submits the suggestion that 
Massachusetts might with advantage pursue the 
method which is now being considered in the state of 
New York. The clipping below from the Outlook of 
April 1 1. explains itself and the above." 

" At the request of the Woman's Prison Associa- 
tion of New York City, an act to establish a State 
Farm for Women has been introduced into the New 
York Legislature. The object is to provide a reform- 
atory to which women ' repeaters ' may be sent for 

from one to five years Certainly the expense 

to the tax-payer would be very much less than the 
present futile and extravagant method. In this 
beginning of the 20th century no punitive system 
should be allowed which has not for its definite pur- 
pose well considered plans for the reformation of the 
offender." 



CHEMICAL TRIP. 

Dr. Wellington recently took the junior chemistry 
class to Holyoke and Springfield to visit a few of the 
industries there which showed the practical side of his 
subject. 

Parsons Paper Company of Holyoke was the first 
place inspected. Here the class was much interested 
in watching the different processes in the manufacture 
of paper from rags, After about two hours spent In 



the paper mill, the class took the trolley for Spring- 
field and went over the plant of the Springfield Gas 
Light Company. At this place the methods of obtain- 
ing, purifying, and storing the gas were illustrated. 

Dr. Wellington very cordially invited the class to 
dine with him at the Cooley House. His invitation 
was accepted with much pleasure and the class 
enjoyed an excellent dinner. 

The next place of interest, a place which always 
seems to be of unusual interest, was the Springfield 
Breweries, but as this establishment was not open for 
inspection until 3 p. m., the class went through the 
shops and the grounds of the Armory. Three o'clock, 
however, found all at the brewery. From the office 
the class was conducted over the entire plant and 
watched the process of beer-making from the hops 
and malt to the little brown keg in the testing-room. 
While upon the roof of the building, Raymoth took 
a picture of the class. With ascending spirits the 
class descended through the main storage rooms to 
the ground floor and then to the bottling-house a few 
yards away. This building contained machines for 
washing, filling, sterilizing, capping, and labeling the 
bottles. 

As it was now late in the afternoon, the class took 
the trolley for Amherst. Each man felt that he had 
been well paid for taking the trip and wish to take this 
opportunity to thank Dr. Wellington for the interest 
he took In making the trip helpful and Instructive. 



Collet |Yot« 



—J. G. Cook. '03, will be in charge of the Hatch 
Experiment Station barn next year. 

— S. C Bacon, '03, will work the coming summer 
as assistant engineer in putting In the new sewage 
system at Sunderland, Mass. 

— The lot west of the chemical laboratory, which 
has been an eyesore for so long, has been leveled and 
put Into condition for seeding. 

— Mrs. Sanderson, for a number of years instructor 
of the college choir and the college glee club, died at 
her home In Amherst, May 5. 

—A number of students have applied for a summer 
course in Chemistry ; and if matters can be satisfac- 
torily arranged such a course will be conducted. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



«6 5 



— R. R. Raymoth, '04, represented the Signal at a 
meeting and banquet of the Intercollegiate Press 
Association held in Boston, Monday evening. May 25. 
— Hastings,'06, who has been at his home in Natick 
suffering from an attack of rheumatic fever for the 
past two months, visited college May 25. He will try 
to pass off the work which he has missed so that he 
may go on with his class next September. 

—Thursday morning. May 28, directly after chapel. 
Captain Shipton of the U. S. artillery inspected the 
batallion and cadets' quarters. The drill consisted of 
batallion parade, review, and inspection, company 
drill, guard mounting, and exercises from the Manual 
of Arms and from Butt's Manual. Owing to a shower 
which came up while the bataliron was on parade most 
of the drill was conducted in the Drill Hall. In the 
afternoon Captain Shipton met the Senior class for a 
talk on military matters; and in the evening he 
addressed the undergraduates In the chapel, taking for 
his subject, " Personal Experiences in Manilla." 

—On Friday, May 15, about fifty members of the 
State Legislature, representing committees on agri- 
culture, education, military affairs, public health, ways 
and means, and fisheries and game, inspected the 
batallion and the college grounds and buildings 
President Goodell gave a reception to the legisla- 
tors and members of the faculty Thursday evening, 
May 14. in the Amherst House. The attention of 
the visitors was called especially to the fact that we 
have no horticultural building and that our Library 
has already become too small to contain all our vol- 
umes. Many of the legislators expressed their satis- 
faction in the work which is being carried on by the 
college and pledged themselves to give any needed 
financial support. 

Seniors. 10; Sophomores, 10. 
On Friday morning. May 15, the Seniors and 
Sophomores played a ten Inning tie game of baseball 
on the campus. The game was Interesting and excit- 
ing from the start. The Seniors started off with four 
runs but In the second inning Taylor gave way to Brett 
and things immediately looked brighter for 1905. 
Brett's slow ball was exceedingly difficult to connect 
with and 1903's hits were scattered. Cook for the 
Seniors was batted freely but owing to his excellent 
support at critical moments the runs were held down. 



Harvey, Jones and Proulx excelled for 1903 while 
Walker, Hunt and Patch held the honors for 1905. 
The score : 



1903. 
Harvey, c. 

Proulx, 2b. 
Barrus, I b. 
Cook. p. 
Allen, s.s. 
Brooks, 3b. 
HaHigan. c.f. 
Jones. I.i. 
Tott'ham, r.f. 
Lamson, r. f. 



1905. 
Williams, ",f. 
Hunt. 2b. 
Walker, 3b. 
Brett, r.f.. p. 
Ingham, c. 
Ladd. c.f. 
Patch, lb. 
Crosby, s.s. 
Taylor, p., r.f. 
Munson, r.f. 



a.b. 
4 
5 
5 
4 
S 
4 
4 
4 
I 
3 

39 

A.B. 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
2 
3 



2 
1 
I 
1 

2 

I 
I 


10 

R. 

2 
2 

I 

I 

2 

I 




I 



2 

I 


3 
I 
I 


1 







I, 

2 
2 
% 
2 
2 
I 
I 
I 


1 



P.O. 

10 
4 
9 

I 

3 
I 

2 



30 

f.O. 
I 
8 

3 

4 
6 

7 
I 






A. 

3 
2 

I 

7 
I 


2 



I I 

A. 

2 
6 
3 



I 

2 
I 




E. 



I 



2 



I 







B 

I 
1 
1 




I 
1 
I 






Innings, 

1903, 

1905. 



45 10 15 *29 15 

3456789 10 

10 12 10 0— 10 

4 2 1 10 0—10 



Sacrifice hit -Harvey. Stolen bases-Hunt 3, Harvey ; 

t^^^J^i H /J li^ i n • Wllliams - Three •»" hit-Cook. Tv£ 
base hits-Walker 2 Ladd. Base on balls-Cook I , Taylor 5, Brett 2 
Struck out-by Taylor 2, by Brett 5. Hit by pitched ball-Tottham 
Double plays-Brett and Walker : Jones, Proulx and Barrus. Passed balls 
-Harvey 2. Time-2 hrs. Umpire-Ahearn. 
•Cook out for not holding 2nd base. 



A TRUE COLLEGE COURSE. 

For what purpose does a college exist ? Is it not 
for the general development of the youth, mentally 
and physically ? New the question is asked, — In what 
way is this purpose to be carried out? If in no other 
way, it must be, by the earnestness on the part of the 
student, both in a general and an individual manner. 
This earnestness should not, by any means, be dlsre 
garded. Here in our higher Institutions of learning, 
young men are practically setting the foundation 
stones, upon which their later work is to rest. Should 
it not be made as firm and sound as possible. It 
certainly cannot be built in a happy-go-lucky, careless 
sort of a way. One might as well think of a man 
building a house, by placing it upon a temporary sup- 
port. Soon he has the task of placing under his 
dwelling another foundation, to replace the old one 
Just so with the college work. If this start is not 
made right, then later In life we shall regret it. and 
the chances are that it may then be too late for 
proper amendments. Now, to make a good begin- 
ning, there should be a system to one's work, however 
simple it may be. Besides, the student should have 






: 



i 



1 66 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



a determination to succeed in his work thereafter, as 
well as in college. 

There Is no one rule by which this determination 
may be shown. In fact there are numerous ways. 
But because these are all open to us, it means not 
that any one may be neglected, to absorb our minds 
with others. This would be similar to placing a 
healthy tree upon a rock with no nourisment. This 
earnestness in a college course may be manifested 
first, perhaps, in the class and college work. One 
naturally looks for it. less in the lower than in those 
classes more advanced. But why not in the lower 
classes too ! Many say—- they have three, or even 
four years before them,— that is ample time, and 
what matters if some is wasted." It is not exactly in 
this light that it should be viewed. The youth has 
finished his high school course ; he has had his play- 
time, if It may be so called. Now he has come pre- 
pared to fit himself for the branch of life's tree to 
which he is most adapted. It is not to impress work 
upon the mind continually, but simply to convey the 
idea, that whatever time is wasted uselessly is just so 
much money thrown away. Truly, some can afford 
the loss of the money, but who can afford to lose the 
knowledge ? 

All institutions, large or small, have a certain repu- 
tation and whatever that may be. each undergrad- 
uate should endeavor to uplift it. Thereby putting its 
banner before the public as it should be. This may 
be accomplished by the co-operation of one and all. 
In so doing they should make the most of the sur- 
roundings, which sometimes are rather unfavorable 
and not encouraging to the student. But many col- 
leges, it must be remembered, are only in an embry- 
onic stage as compared with many very prosperous 
ones. State colleges, especially, have not the possi- 
bilities of receiving large endowments, because, as a 
rule, those who have gone from their doors, are 
obliged to start with little money,— but a bright future 
However the state does its best, and it is only a ques- 
tion of time when these colleges shall be in the front 
ranks. 

We now consider briefly the fraternity work. This 
part of the student's work, though not so evident to 
outsiders as it is to those directly implicated, is of 
great help to a student. Many think it a matter of 
little importance in the college life of a youth, but this 



is a grave mistake. It is here that a man practically 
selects his associates for the remainder of his course. 
He is either to be happy or discontented by his choice, 
and it certainly ought to be the former. This is a 
valuable factor in his social life and also of the col- 
lege. When once initiated a student should work for 
the good of his •• brother " and the promotion of the 
social elements of the society. Here is a retreat in 
which to pass idle moments to the best advantage, 
and at the same time have them enjoyable. These 
societies should be fountains of inspiration to the 
members in their work. Last, but not least, is the 
personal work of the student. In this his general de- 
portment and character of work help much in forming 
an estimation of his character and make-up. His 
morals.though not those of a saint, should be within the 
limits wherein they may promote the welfare of the 
college. College is not the place to attend for a good 
time alone ; on the other hand it is the chance of a 
life-time to make the most of our opportunities. These 
days are undoubtedly as happy, if well spent, as any. 
However that does not mean that they should be 
devoted wholly to pleasure ; there is ample opportu- 
nity for that, after one has entered upon the longer 
paths of life. " Too much work and no play makes 
Jack a dull boy," and for this reason as well as any, 
the physical development is necessary. Consequently 
gymnasiums have been erected with facilities for de- 
veloping various parts of our bodies. Besides these, 
there is a regular rotation of athletics each year. If 
the indoor apparatus are lacking the most must be 
made of outdoor work. In this the student should 
endeavor to do his best both for his own good and 
that of the institution. 

As a whole the earnestness in a true college course 
means not that one attend college as a place to enjoy 
himself wholly, but rather to improve the opportuni- 
ties. Thus, in after life we cannot reflect back to 
those days as so much time thrown away, but rather 
as a period of our lives In which we absorbed all 
knowledge supplied. A youth should, if he did not in 
the beginning, realize after a few months what a 
course is to mean to him. They work accordingly 
with the intention of obtaining the best results. This 
indicates not an excess of mental or physical work. 
It Is simply a development of one part with the other 
and if either predominates let it be the mental work. 
Thus spent, is a college course invaluable to any man. 

A. D. T., *05. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE FRESHMAN BANQUET 

Probably the greatest event of our whole college 
career, was our class banquet, or breakfast, as the 
bophomores choose to call it. 

Or, the night of May 18 we assembled at midnight 
just above the switch at the Hatch Experiment station 
and at ,2-30 we crowded aboard the car and were' 




INFORMAL. 

onMaVlS a TK ,aSt inf ° rma ' ho P *b year "as held 
Amh ♦ m Patr0nssse * were Mrs. Os.rander of 

Amherst. Mrs. Morgan of Northampton, and Mrs 
Miller from Mt. Holyoke. It seems to be the genera, 
opjmon that the combination of Warner's orches 
soon on our way to Bloody Brook House at South "h 7**" and "" *<°rious sunset, to s y 
Deerfield. There we gathered in the banquet ha," T"* * ""* ***** did much to make th s 
and partook of one of the best banouets »2 !„„.„! ' Ust ° Ur ^^ access. Thirty-five couples danc-d 



and partook of one of the best banquets ever witnessed 
by a Freshman. Toastmaster Vernon O. White 
aroused in the class a hearty spirit by his witty re- 
marks and jokes on our drowsy friends the Sophs 
F. H Kennedy was first called upon to respond to a 
toast to •• Our football victory." 

A. H. Shannon was the next man called upon and 

he spoke in glowing terms of the class and of its sec 

ond victory over our friends of 1905. The man from 

rem. F. O. Stevens, was our next speaker, although 

enthus.astic over Texas life, put it aside, and described 

how he with the aid of F. H. Kennedy carried the 

banquet through. A rousing cheer was then given 

and a toast was drunk to »he success of our banquet 



t ,. j "»■- i-uupcs aanced 

"l JV"" wi,h a ha " h ™ ****** o 

unci, Wl.h Che large p arty prese „ ti „ „ h £ 

he ««.«» were able „ come Ml ^ 
their little financial fix. 



SOPHOMORE BANQUET 

nig^ S aT h 2TrM aS , Sheld , i,S u C,aSS ban ^ et ™*y 
mgni. May 22, at Maplewood hotel East U/ha,i„ 

elliwtht ^ S0Hd h0UrS merri ™ nt and£od 

fellowship reigned supreme. And when the i«? 

c — «■ - u ' uanquer. 1 course had been served and the last tM c»' " n ,f 

ttm I J? andW0Taft spoke on our base ball "" h Which bind ^ —hers of « ! cTass* toget er 
team and ,ts prospects of winning from ,905 a third E b T ^ lengthened i and every mar ft e! 
vctory. W. C. Tannatt gave an account of .„. .^ li c J°j* r 1™ to his fellow classmates. Mu'ch prafse 



is due Toastmaster Hill for t^ccess T ^ 
quet. as he has worked hard that all might pass ofMn 
a manner worthy of the class of ,905. 
The following toasts were responded to : 



v.ctory W. C. Tannatt gave an account of the stand- 
ing of the class in mathematics and his account prom- 
ised much for the future. Ben Strain gave an inter- 
esting account of his experiences as a Freshman and 
spoke in glowing terms of the class of ,906 

A toast was drunk to •• our directors." Messrs.Hay- 
ward and Hartford, each of whom was then called 
upon to address the class. Hartford brought down 
he house by his witty remarks in relating his exper- 
iences as one of the class of ,906. 

Several other toasts were then drunk among wh.ch 
one for the class of ,904. .Sons of Old Massachu- . N0TICE ' 

setts was then sung, immediately after which a veil ,„ p 6Very alumnus wh o is to be present at the Sen- 
for,904was given, and after making the banquet hi s haTshall^ M [ R ": R ° b *«™ as to where 
walls ring with our clmm w „ ^ . JL . „ , " q .. I Oz™l shail be sent - !t is very important that this 



Our Class. 

The Class Song, 

The Index. 

Rope Pulls and Other Pulh 

Spirit of the Class. Co-eds and Agent 

Dutch, * 

The Kid. 

To-morrow, 

England. 



President Tupper 

H. H. Coodenough 

C. H. Allen 

J- J. Gardiner 

W. A. Munson 

F. L. Yeaw 

F. A. Bartlett 

L. S. Walker 

C. L. VVhittaker 



™o.»„. u 7. 7 , '"/ "nponam mat this 

matter be attended to immediately in order to glv* 
the committee plenty of time to arrange their hack 
schedule. 

Chairman. 



,, ----. 6 wil , L/OICCUUCC 

wa Is ring with our class yell and a good yell for the 
college, the banquet was broken up. 

We then strolled through the streets of old Deer- 

h erf AtlNo S °,H ^ r,n * Wi,h — ongsand 
we wm „™ , m th u m ° rning We started h °™ and , 

Mir! r™ ° r8el u ,he l00k 0f the S °P hs - as «hey rpoo NOTICE. 

ylll he"™ we Zn m *f • Ut US h ° Pe that ( ™ Reuni0n Tuesda y even 'ng. June , 6 
ZVZ^ ofourUn^ £°™ d ^^ "- " d ^ «■ be «• * ■* 

A. C. Monahan. Pres 



Notice of 



168 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Oct. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR 1903. 

Sept. 26.— Holy Cross at Worcester. 
30. — 'Dartmouth at Hanover. 
5. — Colby at Amherst. 
7. — Williams at Williamstown. 
14.— R. 1. College at Amherst. 
17.— Springfield Training School at Springfield. 
21.— N. H. College at Amherst. 
24.— Univ. of Vt. at Burlington 
31.— Trinity at Hartford. 
7.— Tufts at Medford. 
14. — Amherst at Pratt field. 



Nov. 



BASEBALL. 

Williams, 21 ; Massachusetts, 4. 

Massachusetts played Williams at Williamstown 
May 20. Williams won by the large score of twenty- 
two to four. The playing of the visitors was poor 
throughout the game. Halligan, O'Hearn and Quig- 
ley were the only ones who played good ball. Cook 
replaced Kennedy the last of the fifth, and his work 
was more effective. For Williams, McCarthy, 
Holmes and Neild played the best game, especially 
at the bat. 

The score : 



WILLIAMS. 
A.B. R. 



McCarty. c. c.f. 
Doughty, l.f. 
Nesbitt. 3b. 
•Holmes, c.f.. c. 
Westervelt. p.. lb. 
Wadtworth. 2b. 
Neile. r.f. 
Mears, s.s. 
•Turell, lb., p. 

Totals. 



Martin, s.s. 
O'Hearn. 2b. 
Harvey, r'f. 
Kennedy, p. 
Gregg, !.f. 
Halligan, c.f. 
Books. 3b. 
Walker, lb. 

^k Cy p CX 

Totals, 



6 
4 
5 
6 
5 
6 
5 
5 
5 



3 
3 
4 
5 
2 
I 
I 
1 




lH. 

4 
I 

2 
3 
1 

2 
3 
2 
1 



P.O. 


A. 


B. 


e 





1 








1 


2 


I 





7 








3 


2 


n 


2 
1 


2 





i 











4 


2 


i 



47 


22 


19 


27 


7 


4 


MASSACHUSETTS. 










A.B. 


R. 


IB. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


4 


1 


2 


l 





3 


5 





1 


2 


2 





5 





1 


1 





n 


3 











2 


n 


2 


1 





1 


1 


? 


4 


1 


3 


2 


2 


I 


4 








2 


1 


3 


4 








4 





n 


4 


1 


2 


1 1 


3 


n 


3 















38 



Innings. 
Williams. 
M. A. C, 



4 

1 2 

3 5 




9 

3 4 

10 
2 



24 
6 
I 





I I 9 

8 9 
I x— 22 
.02-4 

Earned runs-Williams 7. Home run— McCarty. Three base hits — 
Mears. Westervelt. Two-base hits-McCarty. Nesbitt First ba^ on 
bal-s -off Westervelt 1 ; off Kennedy 7. Struck ou?-by WesterleU 7 by 

r UT f 7 jj*% K ,T edy ^ : by C ?° k v. S - Lefl on bases-VTlUamsT M. X. 
?"% w ''d P"C"es-Westervelt Kennedy. Passed ball-McCarty. Ouisr 
»*; f lr t l base on errors-Williams 7, M. A. C. I . Hit by Wes ervelt 
Martin, by Kennedy, Neild and Mears. Umpire-Mr. Mackey wesTe^vel, • 

hl^'U"" 1 ! ^"'S^"' £? d Holme f ""d McCarty exchanged places first 
half of the sixth. • »Cookfor Kennedy last of the fifth. K 



Springfield Training School, 14; Massachu- 
setts. 2. 

On May 13, Springfield Training School defeated 
Massachusetts in a loosely played game at Spring- 
field. The game was an exhibition of errors from 
the beginning to the end. For the visitors O'Hearn 
was the only one who played good ball. The batting 
of Metzdorf is worthy of mention. 

The score by innings : 



nnings, 
Sprinpfield 
M. A. C 



Springfield Training School, 



1 23456789 

2 13 2 2 13 -14 
002000000—2 

Trinity, 5 ; Massachusetts, 2. 

Massachusetts met defeat at the hands of Trinity 
last Wednesday in Hartford, Many errors and wild 
throws were made on both sides. The pitchers both 
did good work. Cook, however, excelling, for he gave 
but one base on balls and but two hits were made off 
his delivery. 

The score : 



Duffee, l.f. 
Morgan, c.f. 
Mann, 3b. 
Brlgham, lb. 
Syphax, s.s. 
Allen, 2b. 
Clement, r.f. 
Bradin, c. 
Grange, d. 
Hine, lb. 

Totals, 



Gregg, l.f. 
Ahearn, c.f. 
Harxey, r.f. 
O'Hearn, 2b. 
Martin, s.s. 
Quigley, c. 
Brooks, 3b. 
Cooke, p. 
Walker, lb. 

Totals - 34 6 24 7 ~6 

Innings, 123456789 

™y. 10 10 3 0-5 

MA. C. 10 10 0—2 

Runs-Brigham, Syphax 3, Allen. O'Hearn, Quigley. Stolen bases- 
Cooke. Syphax. Two-base hlr-Brigham. Strlick*out-by Cooke 4?by 
Grange 9 First base on balls-by Cooke I , by Grange 1 . ' Double play- 
Syphax and Hine. Passed ball-Bradln. Hit by pitcrTed ball -Cooke Left 
on Wes-Amherst 5. Trinity 3. Time-2 h. Umpire-FortV 
•Ahearn out. running out of line. J 

Massachusetts. 10; North Adams, 5. 
Massachusetts was victorious over North Adams last 
Saturday morning at Brookside Park. Athol. Cook 
in the box and Ahearn behind the bat did exceptionally 
good work. During the game Quigley was hit by a 
foul tip and broke his finger. 
The score : 



TRINITY. 










A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


■ . 


4 





2 








4 





2 








4 














3 


1 


3 








4 


1 


4 


4 


3 


2 





2 


1 


1 


3 














3 


I 


9 


1 


n 


3 





1 


1 





1 





3 








~* 


— 


mm 


— 





31 


2 


*26 


8 


4 


MASSACHUSETTS. 










A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


R, 


4 





1 





n 


4 





I 








4 


1 


2 







4 


2 


4 


2 




4 


I 





1 




4 


I 


5 


2 




4 





3 


1 




4 


1 





1 




2 





8 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS, 



Gregg, l.f. 
O'Hearn. 2b. 
Harvey, r.f. 
Martin, s.s. 
Hunt. lb. 
Brooks. 3b. 
Halligan. c. f. 
Cook, p. 
Ahearn, 3b., c. 
Quig'ey, c. 

Totals. 



Anderson, c. 
Fountain, p. 
Gallaher. 2c. 
Bressette, lb. 
Tucker, s.s. 
Burgin, l.f, 
GouTd, r.f, 
Mallory, 3b. 
Furgeson. c.f. 

Totals, 

Inninps, 
M. A. C, 
North Adams. 



A.B. 
5 

5 
2 
4 
4 
3 
2 
3 
4 
3 



I 


1 
1 





2 

2 
1 

2 



IB. 

1 


I 


I 


I 

2 

2 



35 10 8 

NORTH ADAMS. 



A.B, 

5 
4 

5 
5 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

39 



R. 



1 
I 
I 

2 








IB. 

I 
I 


3 
2 




1 



8 

1 2 

2 




T.B. 

2 



2 



1 



2 

2 



2 

1 1 



TB. 

1 

I 


3 
3 




I 





P.O. 

3 

1 



9 



7 
7 

27 



P.O. 
5 

I 
10 
2 
3 

2 
I 




2 


2 



2 


I 

2 




A. 

2 

4 

I 

I 

3 







9 

3 4 
1 
2 



?4 
5 6 
3 
3 



1 I 
8 9 

4 x— 10 
0—5 



»^sioa^. , a2'ttgsr 2E& „?«« Li-Hani! 

Fowler. Gardner. Time of t mm^^^ nd ^Z aa J^^'^ 

Massachusetts. 13; North Adams, 3. 
Last Saturday afternoon Massachusetts aeain de 
feated North Adams. The chief features of the lame 

, neay y hm,n g of the winning team. Hunt's hat 

m last year. Kennedy and Hunt both pitched good 

The score : 



HORTICULTURAL SEMINAR? 

Prof. F. W. Rane, professor of horticulture in the 
New Hampshire Stat, College, Durham, addressed 

te Z X T minar Friday even,ng - M *y 22d - 

after the band concert. His address was planned to 
show the relation between the theoretical and the 
pract. cal in horticulture. He thought that young men 
who take the theoretical training given „ £ J,™ 
are in much bctler cond((ion ,„ ^ S 

problems o actual business than they often suppose 
However, they should make every effort to get prac- 
cal experience in horticultural lines. Professor 
Rane s advice wou.d be for such men to go to work 
for a time for some successful practical horticulturist 
without much regard for pay ; but he does not think it 
necessary or proper for the college graduate to s»rve 
an apprenticeship after the oldtime custom 



Alumni. 



The summer meeting of the MassTstatTBo^d of 
Agriculture will be held in connection with the alumni 
dinner in Draper Hall on June 17. 

The classes of 73. 78, '88. '93 and '98 will hold 
reunions this Commencement. 



Martin, s. s. 
O'Hearn, 2b. 
Harvey, r.f. 
Gregg, l.f. 
Hunllb. 
Brooks, 3b. 
Halligan, c.f. 
Kennedy, p. 
Ahearn, c. 

Totals. 



Anderson, Ic. 
Fountain, 3c. 
Gallagher, p. 
Bressette, c. 
Tucker, s.s. 
Gould, 2b. 
Slattery. r.f. 
Bergen, l.f, 
Ferguson, c.f. 

Totals, 

Innings, 
M. A. C. 
North Adams. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 
AB - *. IB. 



5 
5 
5 

4 
5 
5 

4 
5 

4 



1 
I 


2 
4 
1 
I 


3 



2 

2 

2 



3 

I 

I 

I 

J 



42 13 15 

NORTH ADAMS. 

A-B. R. |B. 

2 I 

3 

5 I 

4 o | 
4 

3 1 o 

J ' ° 

4 
2 



T.B. 

2 

3 

2 



5 

1 

2 

I 

4 

20 



T.B. 





1 

I 









P.O. 

I 

2 
I 
I 
II 
I 


1 

I 



1 




3 

3 
2 



27 10 



P.O. 
5 

4 

3 

9 

1 

2 






31 



2 

I 2 
3 I 




2 
3 4 

5 
2 



24 
6 
1 




A. 
1 


5 
2 
I 
1 





10 

7 9 

I x— 13 
0-3 



A'ft^nder^^cXe hT'cLld 3 '"'^"' Ahea ^, 
*>n 2, Fountain, Gould I Ferwson $ hv nJXJl ^ ils A -? r< W Ander- 
Struck out-by O'Hearn S Hal L^ P £ Ched •"•"-Anderson. Gould. 
Form,.,. if__," ...• , ore *K> Halligan. Kennedy. Gallant,/.,- ci,...„. 



Struck ouT-V O^arn 1 " CrC"- hUL^ ^ ^-Anderson', 'Gould 



Ferguson. 

of game— lh.,45m 



TO ALL INTERESTED IN ALMA MATER : 

I wish to call the attention of college men, espec- 
ially the graduating class, and others whose interest at 
this season reverts to the Alma Mater.to the decidedly 
prosperous Alumni Association known and incorpor- 
ated as the "Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Alumni Club of Massachusetts." 

The headquarters of the Association are in Boston 
where the annual reunion and banquet are held 
usually In January. At such times the interests of 
Alma Mater are discussed and the different opinions 
of the graduate body are obtained. There are about 
225 names at present enrolled but many are unable 
to attend the meetings on account of distance, so that 
the average attendance numbers only seventy or 
eighty. 

The objects of the Club are to promote sociability 
and good fellowship among its members and to further 
the interests of the college in every way possible. 
Membership mav be obtained by any alumnus or ex- 
student on application to an official of the Club and 
the remission of one dollar. 



170 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



The Mass. Alumni club has, from its position and 
importance, the right to know and influence the affairs 
of the college more than any alumni body, except, 
perhaps, the general association. The opinion and 
help of all alumni are solicited in this all important 
matter, which should become a duty to all. 
Franklin Ware Davis, 

Secretary M. A. C. C. M. 
85 Colberg Ave. 
Roslindale. Mass. 

'81.— Edward B. Rawson. 220 228 E. Sixteenth 
St., New York city. Principal Friends* Seminary. 
The Seminary is situated in a very pleasant place and 
has under its instruction 162 pupils, ranging from the 
primary to the high school departments. Mr. Raw- 
son is also instructor in history. 

'82. — E. P. Bingham's present address is 45 4 
Chicago St., Los Angeles, Cal. He is engaged in 
fruit growing. 

'86. — Dr. Winfield Ayres has been made Adjunct 
Professor of Geinto-Urinary Surgery at the New York 
Post-graduate Medical School, New York city. 



Spring Clothes . 

Just the sorts that young men will appreciate. 
There's a collection here that absolutely cannot 
be found elsewhere in Western New England. 
Will you come and see it? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 

Haynes & Co., 



Springfield, 



Always Reliable. 



Mass. 




PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 



DAILY SERVICE. 



New York 

Central 

Lines 



To ALBANY, 
To BUFFALO, 
To CHICAGO, 
To CINCINNATI, 
To DETROIT, 
To ST. LOUIS, 



9 Trains 
8 Trains 
7 Trains 
3 Trains 
5 Trains 
3 Trains 



THROUGH COACHES 



BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



SLEEPINO CARS 



D1NINO CARS 



EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 

TO AND FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER, 

AS FOLLOWS: 



HKAD OOWR. 

il.Ofi A.M. 6.02 P.M. 

U.M " B.ib " 
10.00 " 6.IV8 " 
10..S0 " 8.01 " 
11. SO " 9.03 •• 



It. Amherst 
ar. I'h I nirr 
lv. I'ulmer 
ar. Worcester 
ar. Boston 



READ UP. 

ar. 9.06 a.m. 8.36 p.m. 
lv. 8.80 " 7.51 ■« 
ar.7.36 " 7416 •• 
lv.fi.25 «• 6.10 " 
lv. 8.00 " S.00 " 



Through the 
Famous . . . 

Berkshire 

mils . . . 

and tup. 

Albanp 6at<u>ap, 

Which is always Open. 



For further information, time tables, etc., call on ticket agents or address, A. 8. HANSON, O. P. A., Boston, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



phia'pT™. W ' Barrett ' PraCUSing Physiclan ' Philadel " 
ton 8 M~ FrederiCk A DaViS ' h ° me —* Hamil 

De^cT * ^^ " » "*** * * 

balSchool, ,s now practising medicine at Clifton. 

'87— W. N. Tolman. 25th Ward, Gas 
Germantown, Pennsylvania. 

of Ph 9 "n Bl f,, L HartWe " 6XpeCtS t0 take ^e degree 
of Ph. D. at Univ. of Penn. this year. 

•92 -A daughter. RuthVransis, was born to Mr 
and Mrs. H.M. Thompsons May ,4. Mr. Thomp 
sori is superintendent of a large estate in Thomson. 

'95. -C. B. Lane has been appointed head of the 
department of Dairy Husbandry. New Jersery Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. g 

•95.-Prof. E. A. White is now professor of horti- 
culture at Storrs College, Conn. For some time e 
w.engaged in that capacity at Texas Agricultural 

'97.— Charles Adams Peters. B. S Ph D 
190,. Professor of chemistry at the University of 
Iowa since September 1901. 
^98.-George H. Wright. 758 Classon Ave., Brook 

•00— G. F. Palmer has successfully passe d his 
examination for the degree of Ph. D. at Brown Un 
versity. Providence. R. |. Un,_ 

'OO.-Charles Milton Kinney is successfully en 

2THr g r s Lr uctor in Music in Ho,y ° ke ' m - 

JET?!! reCCnt artiC,CS ^ A - W - Mo "<» ^e 
en tied '• Notes on Some Massachus Abyrode! 

with descriptions of New Species " and ■• Notes on' 

the Early Stages of Corylophodes Marginicollis Lee " 
The f irs , Illu trated by fwo fext figures ■ 

wi h one nT " ^ ^ ^ MCOnd - ^ed 
w-th one p ate. appeared In the May number of the 

Bntomclogical News. 

•00.-G. A. Drew, superintendent of the hortlcul- 




STEPHEN LANE FOLGEU, 

200 Broadway, New Yokk. 



Club and College Pinsan.l Rings 
Gold and Silver Medals. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry. 



"OP TO THE MINUTE 



ii 



IN 



MEN'S FINE SHOES, 

The Northampton Shoe Co, 

AtL\n SU 



88 Main St., 



Northampton, Mam 



I 






I 



!l 



i' ' 
■ 



172 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



tural department, has been spending a few days in the 
eastern part of the state, inspecting nurseries, etc. 

'02.— John M. Dellea, R. F. D. No. 1, Great Bar- 
rington, Mass. 

State College, Centre Co., Pa., 

May 1 1. 1903. 
Alumni Editor, 

College Signal, 
Amherst, Mass.. 
Dear Sir : — On Saturday morning I lost every- 
thing by fire except the clothing I had on, and that 
includes all my pictures and mementoes. Will you 
put something to this effect in the Signal as I wish 
especially to secure my classmates' pictures again 
Very sincerely yours, 

Thorne M. Carpenter, '02. 



The University of Chicago is to have a new library. 
It will be erected on the grounds occupied by the fa- 
mous Columbian Exposition midway and will cost 
$1,000,000. 



A good opportunity for two young men 
to learn how to 

RAISE AND SELL VEGETABLES 

so that eaeh acre tilled may be made to 
return from $500 to $1/500. 



Write or call on H. M. HOWARD, 

281 Fuller St., West Nkwton, Mass. 



iHlliiiillliilllJliiUHl 

I Hind* &• Notlt, Publishers, ft W. 15th St. 
N. Y.Ctty, will stud you any of these book: tut* 
Jtct to approval. Enclose th is advertisement 



HII 

ub. 



Song* of 4 tithe Collar** • 
Bona* of the Eaatern OollefM • 
Booff of the Western Colle«;e4 
N*w Song* for OIm Club* . < 

Now Song* for Mai* OuarWUa* • 
Mew Song* for Church Qu»rt,tu* 
Flaea* Thai Bm Taken Prissa • 
mom Pteoe* That wut Ta«o Prises 
Placet for Srrry Oce«*|on • • 

• Mlnete Datamation* tot Collef* MM 
S-Mlnut* (trading* for College OlrU 
How to Attract and Hold an Andtenoe 
I'almer'a New Parliamentary Manual 
Proa and Cone, (Complete Debate*) 
Commencement Parte (Or* tiotu, Oeaja, 
llunnleoa '• New Dialogue* and Playa 



■ 1.60 
i-S* 

: :S 

.» 

!.» 
Jtt 

1.00 I 

too 



ISO 

eeS.T l.M 
1.60 






V>l«iana •» avevyw *V'B*»J Vjf wwj« — * **»/» • ■ W j 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiil 



Write a Note 

to Johnson 




when yon want a book, a picture, some stationery 
or anything else worth having. 



Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AND ART DEALER, 



I 313-315 Main St., 



Springfield, Mass. 



HENRY ^I>^JVJ», 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, . • AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 



FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND I1RIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges Tor Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rlflta. 
Sunday and night cull • responded to at residence, **-*4 <Vo*r 
west of Chase's Block. 




High Grade Work. 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XIII. 



AMHERST, MA^sT^luNTTfT^igoa" 



NO. 15 



stud , J a. PUb " Shed F0rtniEh ^ h * Students •' *• Massachusetts Agricultural College 

notify the Business Mansger. * "* ^^ Sub *-"b"-s who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH. 1904. Editor-in Chief 

HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. 1904. Business Manager. 
FAYETTE D.CK.NSON COUDEN iZ^ "^^ ^^ 1905As ^"' Business Manager. 

ARTHUR LEE PECK. 1904, Interco'legiate. f™ *r FARLEY "THINGS. , 90 5, Alumni Notes. 

ERNEST ADNA BACK, 1904. Department Notes .?"" FRANKL 'N LYMAN, IMS, CoHwgj Notes. 

HERBERT HAROL D GOODENOUCH. .905, Athletics. r^LPH wTrVpSeS ! ' 

-^"^^ ., £5* Slllt , s 011d (;uiu , ,„ 2flc — 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate, 
Reading-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

A. W. Gilbert, Pres. Athletic Association. 

C. H. Griffin, Manager. Base Ball Association, 

a ' Z' ™"' P ' M ' Nineteen Hundred and rX Index. 

A. W. Gilbert, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. 
J. G. Cook, Manager. 
B. Tupper. Manager. 
G. L. Banna, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Pest Office at Amherst. 



Program for tKe Thirty-third <emmenrem<rvt: 

SUNDAY, JUNE 14. 

BACCALAUREATE ADDRESS by H. N. COUDEN. D. D., WASHINGTON, D. C, 

MONDAY, JUNE 15. 

The Flint Prize Oratorical Contest, Junior Class, 3.30 p. m. 

F. D. Couden, Washington, D. C, rl „ _, , 

1 tw n 1^ u . Thomas B. Reed 

J. W. Gregc, Dorchester, ----._ «, A 

u ~ Tne American Volunteer 

e n R h FF ' N ' *» f,°M ' • The Treatment of ,he Fi,i P' n - 

The Mississippi Floods 

Yellow Journalism. A Plague in America 
The Appeal to Heroism 



C. 

G. 
A. 
R. 



L. 
R. 



Peck, Hartford, Conn.. .... 

Raymoth, Philadelphia, Penn., 

Open Air Concert by the Cadet Band. 7 p. m. 

The Burnham Prize Speaking, Freshman and Sophomore, 8 p. m, 
sophomores : 

G. H. Allen, Somerville. - Shakespear's Mark Antony 

F. A. Bartlett. Belchertown. Nationa , (njustjce 

W. H. Craighead, Boston, - . Decision and Energy of Character 

F. F. Hutchings, South Amherst, - .... Eu | ogy of Garfield 



174 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



FRESHMEN I 

A. D. Farrar, Amherst, 
A. F. Hayward, South Amherst, 
A. H. Shannon. Worcester. 
V. O. White, Attleboro, 



The General's Client 

Against Flogging in the Navy 
Speech of Frederick Douglas, at Gettysburg, 1871 

The Last Charge of Ney 



Fraternity Banquets, 9-30 p. m. 



TUESDAY, JUNE 16. 

Alumni Meeting in the Mathematical Room; 9 a. m. 

Annual Meeting of the Trustfes, at the office of the Hatch Experiment Station, 9-30 a. m. 

Meetinc of the Committe on Experiment Depaptment, at the office of Hatch Experiment Station, 



1 1-30 A. M. 



Class Day Exercises, 1-30 p. m. 



P. W. Brooks, Cambridge, 

C. P. Halligan, Roslindale, 

H. J. Franklin, Bernardston, 

W. W. Peebles. Washington, D. C, 

E. M. Poole, North Dartmouth. 

W. E. Tottingham, Bernardston, 

M. H. West, Belchertown, 



Campus Orator 

Hatchet Orator 

Class Orator 

Class Song 

Pipe Orator 

Ivy Poet 

Class Ode 



Battalion Parade, Drill and Review. 4 p. m. 
Suppers of the various Classes. 6 p. m. 
Reception by President and Trustees, 8 to 10 p. m. 
Senior Promenade in Drill Hall, 10 p. m. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17. 

Graduation Exercises, Announcement of Prizes and Conferring of Degrees, 10 a. m. 

Commencement Speakers : 

H. J. Franklin. Bernardston. - - - M an ' s Battle with Insect! 

A. Parsons. North Amherst. • 

W. W. Peebees. Washington, D. C, - 

E. M. Poole, North Dartmouth, .... 

W. E. Tottingham, Bernardston, .... 

M. H. West, Belchertown. 



Superintendents in Agriculture 

Southern Injustice 

Obstacles as Related to Success 

The New Form of Energy. Radio Activity 

The New England Village Green 



Alumni Dinner, immediately following Graduation Exercises. 

THURSDAY AND FRIDAY, JUNE 18 and 19. 

Examination of Candidates for Admission, at the Botanic Museum, 9 a. m. Two days are required 
for examination. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




"75 



Edi'tori&ls. 



Class of 1903, we wish you Godspeed in the 
future that lies before you. May the highest success 
and ths truest fame reward your efforts to achieve. 
In all your endeavors may you seek the noblest ends 
for the good of your brother, and in the interest of 
humanity, to whom you owe the civilization that gives 
you its blessing. But in all your success, be true to 
the Mater who has guided your thoughts and directed 
your effort. Let her interests be your interests, her 
desires your desires, and where she leads do you fol- 
low with encouragement and assistance. 



The report of the Inspector, Capt. James A. Ship 
ton. published in this issue Is, in general, pleasing to 
us, though we are hit, squarely, in a few instances. 
It is a candid account of the condition of the battalion 
equipments and dormitories, and is helpful in pointing 
out our weak points. On the whole the battalion pre- 
sented a satisfactory appearance ; and though we 
consider our efforts as failing in many respects, yet in 
comparison with similar Institutions, situated as we 
are, our drilling is creditable. Yet it seems to us that 
if there was more of the esprit de corps among the 
men and and a desire of each company to do its best 
we might be able to give an exhibition of drilling that 
would reflect credit upon Massachusetts. 



Those well-known words of Lowell, 

" This is the high tide of the year, 
And whatever of life hath ebbed away 
Comes flooding back with a rippling cheer," 

are peculiarly applicable to the present time. This is 
the time when hearts are lightest and brightest ; when 
graduates in school and college are in a flutter 
of excitement ; when campus and yard are decked in 
their gayest. There is no prospect so bright and 
cheering to the college man or woman as the thought 
of the Commencement season. To the Senior it is 
the finish of one important heat in life's race ; to the 
alumnus it Is the judge's stand of his own attempts. 
It is the occasion for the renewing of old ties, held 
sacred in each heart, and the forming of new friend- 
ships. It Is the happiest time of all the year. Let 
us make the most of it. 



One thought comes to our minds in connection 
with the Commencement exercises and that is In ref- 
erence to the Class Tree. This holds an Important 
place in the festivities, more so in other institutions 
than In Massachusetts. In many colleges the class 
tree is planted in the Freshman year, an idea which 
we heartily endorse. It seems rather strange that the 
tree should be planted in the last year of our college 
life, when we leave it before it has had a chance to 
get a good start, to be cared for by others, who natur- 
ally have not the same interest in it that we have, 
and who would not attend to it as we should ; whereas 
if planted in the first year of college life, it could and 
would be watched with a jealous care for at least 
three years, by which time it would have gained a 
foothold and would perhaps be thriving well, by the 
time we buried the hatchet of war for a more peace- 
ful life. It is too late for us as a class to consider the 
matter for action but we commend Its adoption to you 
who are following. 



It is but fitting at this season of college activities 
when the life and pleasures of the college world are 
drawing to a close for those who are at the Com- 
mencement of their duties in the larger, more really 
active, and, yes, more interesting world, that we 
should say a few words to the class that is leaving us. 
Four years of training in the arts and sciences that 
are of use and importance, you take with you to this 
other world, and the responsibilities resting upon you 
are greater than those of the ordinary citizen of the 
world. Remember how much you owe to the ordin- 
ary man through whose benefactions you have been 
able to receive the training with which you are to 
meet your Destiny. The •• ordinary man." as we 
term him. perhaps many of them, the " Great Silent 
Men." whom Carlyle so heroically describes. Is In 
danger of being thought too little of by the college- 
bred man. But this should not be. Through some 
inability he has been denied the privileges granted you. 
and through noblesse oblige you should respect him. 
To your magnanimity he should be able to turn In his 
embarassment, since he helps you in your need. 
True, since your abilities are larger, your successes 
should be greater, but the ordinary man is an element 
of influence In the world which is strongly felt. So. 
in all your dealings In life, let us ask of you. be con- 
siderate of the man who is beneath you. 



176 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






IV f POEM. 

Once more, at sacred custom's call 

And pressed by memries dear, 
A class has gathered by this wall 

And plants the ivy here. 

Can such a common, tender slip 

Be worth the time we spare ? 
Can it secure a vital grip 

Without a waste of care? 

See, 'round about, it-, predecessors bold 
Which, clamb'riug from stone to stone. 

Have gained a solid hold ; 
Not. sought to stand alone. 

Like these, our ivy, though it yield 

Now to the blast and quail. 
Ere long these solid walls shall shield 

'Gainst blust'ring elements; a goodly mail. 

Twill lend to this cold stone 

A sense of warmth and grace — 
While, by it:; freshness, shall be strown 

A softness o'er the face. 

Courage! classmates, as we peer 

Into the future's untried heights 
Which we must clear 

Or forfeit precious rights. 

Let us from the ivy, learn to cling 

To stronger lives than ours 
As we strive to rise from present things 

To more elusive powers. 

Thus climbing by a healthy growth 

May we. like it, in turn 
Show gratitude for increased worth 

And not. our helpers spurn. 

Then, as our ivy blends with these 

In the years yet to come. 
Let us, in grateful mood, not cease 

To take its lesson home. 

If, ere its accustomed time 

The ivy perchance die. 
Do not to it failure assign : 

The least success deny. 

Life's worth the struggle though we fa' I 

To reach th' goal of our ideal. 
Better to leave a tale 

Of some success than failure's seal. 

Exelsior ! then, our motto be, 

'Till, like the ivy bold 
Frowning heights having ascended, we 

The plains of success hold. 

W. E. TOTTINGHAM, 



CLASS SONG. 

We are going from Massachusetts to the great wide world 
beyond, 

Whence another life awaits us bright before. 
We will enter on it bravely, with a hearty fearless cheer, 

For college and the happy days of yore. 
Let the memories glad of all the years that we have spent 
together 

Unite us ever, distant though we be. 
Let our parting song, awakening ever loyalty to her. 

Tell of Massachusetts and old Noughty-three. 

Choi us. 
We will meet again to celebrate the feats that we have won. 
And we'll make old Bay State echo with our hearty, fear- 
less cheer. 
And then we'll fill our glasses and will drink again the health 
Of our Alma Mater, Alma Mater dear. 

As classmates joined for four long years at Massachusetts 
dear, 
We have stood upon her campus side by side. 
Tis with sadness that we say good-bye to our old Alma 
Mater, 
To class so dear, to friends so true and tried. 
In our inner thoughts her memory will ever urge us on, 

And loyal sons and classmates we will be. 
Let loyalty for Bay State dwell with every loyal son, 
For old Massachusetts and for Noughty-three. 

W. W. Peebles, '03. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



177 



^m 

BASKETBALL REPORT. 

RECEIPTS. 

Amherst guarantee, $5 00 

Brown guarantee, 30 00 

Northampton guarantee, 5 00 

Williams guarantee, 30 00 

Taxes and gate receipts, 72 00 



$142 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Guarantee Northampton Y. M.C. A., $5 00 

Postage, 5 75 

Shoes, 7 00 

Amherst game. 2 50 

Ludlow guarantee, 8 00 

Union. Vt., 30 00 

New ball, 5 00 

Brown trip, 35 80 

Bandages, 45 

Laundry. ' 00 

Williams trip, 29.70 

Printing. 4 °° 

New suits, 5 00 

Sundries, 2 80 



'03. 



BATTALION ROSTER. 

Adjutant — Howard M. White, with rank of 
first lieutenant. 

Quartermaster — Clifford F. Elwood, with 
rank of first lieutenant. 

COMPANY A. 

Captain — F. D. Couden. 
First Lieutenant — R. R. Raymoth. 
Second Lieutenant— M. F. Ahearn. 
Sergts.— F. L. Yeaw. 

W. A. Munson. 

G. N. Willis. 

S. B. Haskell. 

E. S. Fulton. 
Corps. — G. W. Patch. 

T. F. Hunt. 

B. Tupper. • 

Z. T. Hubert. 

COMPANY B. 

Captain — C. H. Griffin. 
First Lieutenant — H. D. Newton. 
Second Lieutenant — G. E. O'Hearn. 
Sergts.— G. H. Allen. 
J. J. Gardner. 

E. W. Newhall. 
M. A. Blake. 

Corps.— W. B. Hatch. 

F. F. Henshaw. 
F. F. Hutchings. 
L. W. Hill. 



BAND. 

First Lieutenant and Chief Musician- 
Peck. 

Sergts.— E. A. Back. 

W. A. Staples. 
Corps.— A. W. Gilbert. 

S. R. Parker. 

J. W. Gregg. 
Armorer— R. P. Gay. 



-A. L. 



$142 00 



E. B. Snell, Manager. 



THESES SUBJECTS. 

Allen, W. E. Metallurgy of Lead and Copper. 
Bacon, S. C. " Benefits of the Trusts." 
Barrus. G. L. " Raising and Marketing Apples. 
Bowen, H. C. "Strawberry Culture." 
Brooks. P. W. " Raising and Marketing Apples. 



Cook, J. G. " Bordeaux Mixture 
Chemistry, Preparation and Use 

Franklin, H. J 
ciliata. Say." 



Halligan, C. P. 
Athletic Field." 
Hood, W. L. 
Harvey, L. F. 
Jones, G, D. ' 
Lamson, C. H. 
Monahan, N. 



ts History, 
External Anatomy of Corythuca 
•• Design and Report for New 



'• Derivation of English Words." 
" Insects Injurious to the Apple." 
• Citizenship." _ 

•• Household Insects." 
F. " Influence of Atmospherical 
Electrical Potential on Plants." 

Nersessian, P. W. " Morphology and Develop- 
ment of Fruit Buds." 

Osmun, A. V. " External Anatomy of th j Brown- 
tail Moth." 

Parsons, A. " Milk and Milking." 
Peebles, W. W. Contributions toward a monograph 
on the Cerotalidae of North America, north of Mexico. 
Poole, E. M. " Insects Injurious to the Apple." 
Proulx, E. G. " Use of Tobacco Fertilizers." 
Robertson, R. H. " Fertilizer Analysis." 



Snell. E. B. 
and Steel." 

Tlnkham. C. 

Tottingham, 

Tower, W. 
Trees." 

West, M. H 



•• Economic Propoduction of Iron 

S. " Economics of Railroad Ties." 
W. E. " Radio-activity." 
V. " Insects injurious to Shade 

•• New England Village Greens." 



HORTICULTURAL SEMINAR. 

Those who attended the last seminar had the un- 
usual pleasure of listening to Mr. J. H. Hale, the well 
known Connecticut and Georgia peach man. Prof. 
Waugh's introductory remarks and Mr. Hale's replies 
kept the audience in one continual spell of laughter. 

Mr. Hale In his address opened the eyes of the 
students, as no speaker has before, to the great oppor- 
tunities for successful small and orchard fruit growing 
right here on our abandoned farms In New England. 
Mr. Hale has not reached that success which he has 
without becoming enthusiastic over the advantages 
which New England presents both in soil and near- 
ness to the great fruit markets. His experiences, 
how he had lost and how he had made money on his 
crops; his methods of growing, harvesting, packing, 
storing and | hi.; fruit, all illustrated In a most 

practical way the theories set forth In text books. 

The fellows were won by Mr. Hale's jolly, open and 
frank nature, and left the seminar with only the best 
wishes for him. and with their minds stored with new 
ideas for future thought. 



178 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



BASEBALL. 

Massachusetts, 20 ; Y.M.C.A. Training School. 3. 
On Wednesday, June 3, Massachusetts defeated 
the Springfield Training School on the campus. 
From the start the game was a walk-over for the 
home team, who found Metzdorf, the visitor's pitcher, 
for sixteen hits. The chief features of the game 
were the batting of Martin, O'Hearn and Gregg, and 
the two doubles by Cook, O'Hearn, Hunt and Martin. 
The score : 



Martin, s. s. 
O'Hearn, 2 b. 
Gregg. I. f. 
Ahearn, c. 
Hunt, I b. 
Kennedy, r. f. 
Cook. p. 
Halligrn, c. f. 
Brooks, 3 b. 

Total. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 










A.B. 


R. 


IB. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


5 


1 





3 


3 


2 


6 


2 


3 


3 


B 


1 


6 


1 


2 


1 








5 





3 


6 


3 





5 


1 





16 


2 


1 


6 








1 


1 





5 











1 





4 








1 





u 


4 





I 


2 


3 


1 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



179 



46 



33 22 



MASSACHUSETTS. 
A.B. R. 



Martin, s. s. 
OHe.im. 2 b. 
Gregg, If. 
Ahearn. c. 
Hunt. I b. 
Kennedy, r. f. 
Cook, p. 
Halligan, c. f. 
Brooks, 3 b. 

Total, 



Metzdorf. p. 
Gaskie. I.f. 
Thompson. 3 b. 
Pineo, c. 
Lemon. 2 b, 
Rosboro. s. s. 
Buckland. r. (. 
Hill, c. f. 
Macphcrson, 2 b. 



4 

4 
6 
4 
S 

3 

4 
3 

4 



6 
3 
3 
3 
l 


1 
1 
3 



Ib. 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
I 



2 



P.O. 

3 
4 

4 
12 


I 
3 



A. 

3 
4 

1 



4 

3 



E. 

3 



2 

1 
1 




Innings, 

Colby, 
Massachnsetts, 



123456789 10 11 

003000101 1—6 
400000100 0—5 

Bases on balls-off Vale. Hunt and Halligan. Bases stolen-Craig. 
Teague. Abbot. Lelghton, O'Hearn. Hunt 2. Cook. Two-base hits- 
Coombs. Craig. Ahearn. Double plays-Cook. Ahearn and Hunt ; Hunt 
and Martin : Abeam, Hunt and O'Hearn. Hit by pitched ball-Cook, Mar- 
tin and Brooks. Struck out-by Vale. Martin 2. Ahearn 1. Hunt 1. Ken- 
nedy 3, Cook 4. HalMgan 3, Brooks 1 ; by Cook. Vale. Keene and Rey- 
nolds. Passed balls-Cowings 2, Ahearn 1 . Sacrifice hits-Ahearn. 
Cowings and Lelghton. Left on bases— Massachusetts 13, Colby b. 
Umpire— Quigley. Time— 1 hr. 40 min. 



37 



20 



16 



27 15 



Y. M. C A. TRAINING SCHOOL. 



Total, 

Innings. 
Massachusetts. 



A.B. 
4 

4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

35 






I 
1 







IB. 

2 

1 





1 



I 





P.O. 




7 
12 
1 

2 
2 



A. 

7 

2 
3 

1 



1 



3 5 24 14 7 

123456789 
2 4 2 12 2 7 0-20 
* A Training School. 00 1 20000 0—3 

Bases 'on 'balls-off Metzdorf, Martin, Brooks, Brooks. Cook 1, Kennedy 
Halligan 2. Two base hits-O'Hearn^regff. Home runs-pHearn, 
Gregg and Metzdorf. Double plays -Cook. O'Hearn. Hunt and Martin 
HTt by pitched ball-by Metzdorf. Martin and Ahearn. Struck out-by 
Mei dorf /Ahearn. Kennedy Cook 2 Halligan 2 ; by Cook, Caskie, Macpher- 
son 2, Passed balls-Pineo 3. Ahearn. Left on bases-Pineo. Buck'and 
2 Lemon. Thompson, O'Hearn, Gregg, Hunt, Cook, Kennedy 2. Time- 
I hr. 45 min. Umpire— Qulgley. 

Colby, 6 ; Massachusetts, 5. 
Massachusetts was defeated on the campus last 
Friday by Colby in a very fast game of eleven inn- 
ings. The pitching of Vale was remarkable and ac- 
counts largely for the victory of the visitors. During 
the game Vale struck out fifteen men. The difficult 
stops of O'Hearn and Coombs and the three double 
plays are worthy of mention. The wet condition of 
the field was the cause of most of the errors made. 
The score : 



Vale. p. 
Coombs. 2 b. 
Cowings, c. 
Keene, 1 b. 
Craig, 3 b. 
Teague, 1. f. 
Abbot, r. f. 
Letghton, c. f. 
Reynold, s. s. 

Total, 



COLBY. 












A.B. 


R. 


IB. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


5 


1 


2 


1 


4 





5 


1 


2 


4 


5 


2 


4 





1 


15 








5 





2 


11 





2 


5 





1 


1 


2 





5 


1 


1 











5 


2 


1 








1 


4 


1 


1 


1 





1 


5 











3 






43 



11 



33 



14 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING TRIP. 

The senior and junior classes in landscape garden- 
ing visited the city parks of Hartford on Saturday. 
June 6, 1903. Leaving the crosswalk at an early 
hour, we reached Hartford before 10 o'clock, where 
Mr. Parker. 76, was waiting for the party with a five 
seated carriage and four horses. From the depot we 
drove through the capitol grounds, under Memorial 
arch, and up High street to Keney tower. Mr. Par- 
ker here explained the laying out of a small square, 
calling our attention to the use made of the trees on 
another street for a background in this small compo- 
sition. 

From here we went out Albany avenue to the west 
entrance of Keney park. Entering here, Mr, Parker 
spoke of the proposed entrance, and pointed out a 
very fine example of a border mound. And then we 
plunged into the woods. The drive seemed to be 
nearly perfect. At no point on the whole two miles 
and a half of roadway could we see over one hundred 
yards ahead. Very fine examples of the Olmstead 
method of bunching the change indirection and grade 
of roads were constantly coming up before us. After 
crossing Vine street we were able to see the park In 
a more undeveloped appearance. At last we arrived 
at the Windsor avenue entrance, where a very attrac- 
tive gate structure had been erected. Turning back 
here, we went back toward the Albany avenue en- 
trance by another drive to Mr. Parker's house, where 
he invited us to dinner. 

After fully satisfying our appetites, we started for 
Elizabeth park, in the west part of the city. Mr. 



Wirth, superintendent of city parks, met us here and 
took us through this beautiful and popular park. Mr. 
Wirth was very entertaining, and was always ready to 
answer questions. After driving through this park 
and going through the nursery, we started for Pope's 
park, passing Harriet Beecher Stowe's and Mark 
Twain's residences on the way. 

Mr. Wirth showed us the outdoor gymnasium, and 
then we started for Riverside park, on the east side. 
This area is under water for about two months every 
spring, and the park men are very much handicapped 
on this account. In this east side park the little chil- 
dren of the slums swarm and enjoy themselves in the 
bathing houses and wading pools. 

From Riverside we drove to the Heublein hotel, 
where Prof. Waugh gave us a supper in the grill 
room. After our meal, which was a hurried one, we 
gave Prof. Waugh and Mr. Parker a rousing college 
yell. 

We arrived in Amherst about 10 o'clock, and 
congratulated ourselves on having spent the most 
profitable day of the year on this trip to Hartford. 



Obstr>?ation$pPC onc ' u S' on S 



Observer College Signal, 

Dear Sir:— \ desire to take advantage of the offer 
made by the "Observer" in the last issue of the Col- 
lege Signal, not to " cast slurs on his individual integ- 
rity, or other honorable and good qualities which he 
might be supposed to possess," but to express my lack 
of appreciation of his efforts to belittle the attempts 
of certain young women to acquire knowledge at the 
M. A. C. 

The " Observer's " attitude, as illustrated by his 
remarks and quotations in the issues of April 8 and 
June 3, is anything but creditable. In fact his 
remarks and quotations may be considered insulting 
to the young ladies now at the M. A. C. and to their 
friends as well. If he does not approve of the efforts 
of these young ladies to get a portion of their educa- 
tion at the M. A. C. he should either keep silent on 
the subject or express himself in the college publica- 
tion in a less offensive manner. He should seek the 
welfare of his college rather than an opportunity to 
advertise his poor opinion of the opposite sex. 

The suggestion of the " Observer " in the last issue 



of the College Signal has been characterized in my 
hearing by an older graduate of the M. A. C. than 
myself as "simply dirty." Permit me to add that in 
my judgment his suggestion reflects no credit upon 
himself, his college paper, or his college. 

A young woman, or an older one for that matter, 
who desires to take advantage of the opportunities 
offered at the M. A. C, is entitled to the same rights 
and privileges, within proper bounds, as are the mem- 
bers of the other sex. She is strictly within her 
rights in seeking those opportunities and privileges 
and Is entitled to equal protection and consideration 
by the Commonwealth, the college authorities and 
the undergraduates. That the young ladies now at 
the M. A. C. compare favorably with their brothers in 
that institution is a fact which requires no proof from 
me. 

Permit me to add in conclusion that I trust '• the 
generous and high-minded Observer" will In the 
future be a little more considerate of the rights and 
the feelings of those worthy young women who have 
found in the M. A. C. a college home and who are not 
there because they need - reformation." Whether 
we are believers in co-education or not let us be very 
slow to attempt to discredit by ridicule any movement 
which may result in good to our college. Rather let 
us favor the giving to these young women a chance to 
demonstrate that their presence at the M. A. C. is a 
benefit not only to themselves but to the institution as 
well. Very truly, 

F. H. Fowler, '87. 
Boston, June 8, 1903. 

Whew ! The Observer has his fingers crossed. 
He never expected to arouse such an enthusiastic 
champion or would-be-champion of the fair sex. 
Bless you. my friend, the Observer Is personally 
acquainted with three out of the three co-eds now In 
college, and he would be very. very, sorry If they 
entertained an idea that it was his intention to be 
either " insulting " or "dirty " in his remarks about 
them. Besides some of his particular friends are so 
much the particular friends of some of the co eds that 
it would be as much as his life was worth if this col- 
umn were universally interpreted in the same serious 
manner as our well-meaning brother of '87 has done. 
" Great jeewollapers bejee," as a friend of ours would 
say, brother, you have worked yourself up Into a glorl- 






i8o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ous old stew, for which no one will thank you unless 
there are others as literal— I might use a worse 
adjective than that— as yourself. Certainly the co-eds 
themselves will not thank you for it. Why if the 
Observer were a co-ed. he— or she— would rather see 
a thousand paragraphs such as have appeared in this 
column, rather than one such letter as heads it this 
week. For that reason, the Observer hesitated some 
time before publishing the letter, and would not have 
done so except for the fact that its writer would have 
been sure to give another reason than the real one, 
for such a failure to fulfill the promise made a fort- 
night ago. The Observer wishes to state tight here 
that he does not endorse the sentiments in the above 
letter at all. The co-eds need no such defense. If they 
did, it would not be published in the Signal. 

As effecting himself the worst blow to the Observer 
is in the character of the letter. It is so serious, you 
know, just as if the Observer were either telling what 
he supposed to be the truth, or was intending others 
to think that he was doing so. It has always been the 
intention of the Observer to make his writings a little 
lighter reading than the rest of the Signal, and to 
that purpose he has thought to be slightly humorous 
from time to time. Is it true that ail the funny things 
that he has supposed himself to have said, have not 
been appreciated as such ? The Observer does not 
even pretend to pose as an imitator of Brann. for 
Brann intended himself to be taken seriously by some 
people, even if he did expect to be laughed at by the 
majority of his readers. The Observer did not intend 
anyone to take him seriously. Perhaps our friend is 
a little lacking in his sense of the ridiculous. Cer- 
tainly he is in that of tact. Cultivate both, brother. 
Neither will do you harm, and the possession of either 
adds to the happiness of living. 

As to the article of May 8, there is a little point to 
that which may not have been clearly brought out— 
Certainly Mr. Fowler did not see it— that might be 
taken seriously. When a Boston paper that as a rule 
gives one, or two, or three short paragraphs a year to 
the doings of the college as a whole, suddenly departs 
from its usual custom, and fills an entire page with a 
profusely illustrated article on the graduation of a 
single co-ed. and a short course co-ed at that ; and 
then adds insult to injury by stating that the lady had 



Observer and his mates are giving up four of the best 
years of their lives to attain ; surely we may be 
allowed to disagree with the writer, and in our humble 
way, to answer the article. 

****** 
The Observer has enjoyed being partly serious for a 
little time. He only hopes that the co-eds and other 
readers will not allow their just anger at Mr. Fowler 
to affect in any way their friendship for himself. In 
the Observer's opinion, the letter should have been 
written to him personally and not for publication. The 
fact that the writer did not seem to care enough 
about the matter to voice his opinions, except in pub- 
lic, seems to justify the conclusion that what is per- 
haps a natural desire, to see himself in print, and to 
advertise F. H. Fowler, is behind the whole matter. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



181 



Collet N°**S- 



—Arc lights are being placed along the College 
walks. 

—Franklin, Osmun. Lamson and West will return 
next fall for graduate work. 

Harvey, '03, had the misfortune to break a fin- 
ger at baseball practice recently. 

—Dr. Fernald, as State nursery inspector, was 
called to Boston last week on business. 

—Gay, Gregg and Peck have received positions at 
the St. Louis Exposition for the summer. 

—The base ball game to have been played with 
Wesleyan last Saturday was canceled on account of 

rain. 

—Photographer Sheldon of Northampton took a 
group picture of the Seniors on the chapel steps. 

June 2. 

—The Seniors will hold their class banquet at High- 
binder's Hotel. Hartford, Conn. Thursday evening. 

June 18. 

—The Junior class in landscape gardening, accom- 
panied by Prof. Waugh. inspected the Hartford. Ct.. 

parks. June 6. 

p ro f p. A. Waugh will spend the summer 

months visiting In England, Germany and France. 

The Professor is in need of a rest and we trust the 

do him good, and that he will return in the 



men aaus msuu iv nijmjr uy ji»hm 6 »•»• »■■« ■— / cna 8 

mastered in a few weeks the knowledge which the | fall with renewed strength and vigor. 



— It is reported that the Chinese minister will be 
unable to attend the commencement exercises as he 
had announced. 

— The Senior class bed has been tastefully set with 
foliage plants by Mr. Canning. The design was made 
by M. H. West, '03. 

— Thompson, '05, was called to his home at Rox- 
bury on account of the serious sickness of his sister, 
which resulted in her death, June 4. 

— The following men will be about College during 
the summer: Hodgkiss. Franklin, Osmun, Robertson. 
Tottlr.gham, Cook, Monahan, Back, Henshaw, Gilbert, 
Barnes and Bartlett. 

— One of the best meetings of the Seminar of the 
y2ar occurred June 2 at 7-30 p. m. The meeting 
was addressed by Mr. J. H. Hale; and although his 
talk was full of instruction' from beginning to end he 
managed to keep his hearers in a roar of laughter. 

— The College Senate has been reorganized with 
the following members : F. D. Couden, J. W. Gregg, 
G. E. O'Hearn and R. R. Raymoth, 1904, J. J. 
Gardner, T. F. Hunt, W. A. Munson and G. W. 
Patch. 1905. President. F. D. Couden ; Vice-Pres., 
R. R. Raymoth ; Sec'y. G. W. Patch. 

— Mr. G. A. Parker, Superintendent of Keney 
Park, Hartford, Mr. J. A. Pettigrew, Superin- 
tendent of Parks, in Boston, and Mr. Wirth Supt. 
of city Parks, Hartford, spent Friday in Amherst, in 
the interest of the Landscape Gardening Prize 
offered the Senior and Junior classes. 

—Prof. Herman Babson has been granted a year's 
leave of absence by the trustees. Accompanied by 
Mrs. Babson he will sail the 27th of this month from 
New York for Naples. After an extended tour of 
Italy and Switzerland he hopes to reach Berlin by 
Sept. 1 ; where about a year will be passed in the 
study of German and work at the University. During 
Professor Babson's absence, his classes will be con- 
ducted by Mr. Howard Lawton Knight. B. S.. 190^. 

Mr. L. R. Herrlck. instructor in French and 

Spanish, expects to spend the vacation months in 
Europe. He will leave, the last of the month, for 
Rotterdam and Antwerp, and after spending some 
time in Holland, will visit Heidelberg for the study of 
German. His tour will carry him through Fnnce 
and Spain, in which countries he will spend some time 
studying the languages. 



Sophomores, 9 ; Freshmen, 5. 
On Friday June 5. the Sophomores secured a vic- 
tory over the Freshmen. The game was largely a 
pitchers' battle and both did well. Fur '05 Ingham. 
Patch and Walker excelled, while for '06 Kennedy 
and Tirrell excelled. For a class gam : it was re- 
markably clean and fast and both teams played a good 
game. 



The score 



Ingham, c. 
Williams, 1. f. 
Hunt, p. 
Patch. I b. 
Walker. 2 b. 
Brett, 3 b. 
Crosby, s. s. 
Ladd. c. f. 
Munson. r, f. 

Tots I, 



Martin, s. s. 
Taft. c. 
Kennedy, p. 
Strain, 2 b. 
Rogers, c. f. 
Moseley. I. f. 
Peakes, r. f. 
Tirrell, 3 b. 
Mahoney. 1 b. 

Totol, 
Innings. 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen. 



SOPHOMORES 
A.B. R 

5 



b 

3 

4 

:> 
4 
4 
4 
3 



!■-.. 
3 


2 

I 

I 




P.O. 

10 


4 
8 
2 

I 





A. 



4 


I 

1 







H. 



1 



3 
I 

3 





35 


10 


7 


27 


6 


8 


PRBSHMEN. 










A.B. 


R. 


In. 


1 o. 


A. 


E. 


3 


1 


I 


1 


2 





4 


1 





1 1 


1 





5 


3 


1 





3 


1 


4 





1 


1 


2 


2 


4 














1 


3 





1 








1 


4 

















4 





2 


2 


2 





4 








9 









35 



5 5 

12 3 4 

3 2 1 

2 



24 10 5 

5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 0-9 

2 1-5 



Bases stolen-Patch, Walker. Munson 2. Rogers. Two-base hils 
Moseley. Ingham. Three-base hits— Ingham. Walker. Bases on ball'; 
Kennedy, Hunt I . Walker 2 ; off Hunt, Martin, Taft and Moseley. Hit by 
pitched bal!s-bv Kennedy. Munson; by Hunt, Rogers. Struck out— by 
Hunt. Martin. Kennedy, Moseley 2, Peakes 3, Mahoney : by Kennedy, 
Patch. Brett. Munson, Williams 2. Laid 2. Crosby 3. Passed balls— Taft 
5. Left on bases— 05, 5; '06, 7. Time- 1 hr. 45 mln. Umpire— 
Biram. 



Alu 



mm. 



AUSTIN W. MORRILL. B. S.. '00; PH. D.. '03. 

The honor of being the second graduate of Massa- 
chusetts to secure the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
from his Alma Mater has fallen to Austin Winfield 
Morrill of the class of Nineteen Hundred. 

Entering upon his graduate course in September 
after graduation. Mr. Morrill elected entomology for 
his major, botany and zoology for his minors. He 
has made a special study of the Ahyr ■■■/ 1 .. Extreme 
thoroughness and perseverence have characterized 
his work throughout the three years course, in recog- 
nition of which, he is the recipient of highly gratifying 
compliments from Washington and elsewhere. 

Mr. Morrill has presented the following original 
papers for his degree : " Life-history and Description 
of the Strawberry Aleyrodes (A ley rales pacha nil n. 



182 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



s p" one plate, Can. Ent. for February; " Notes on 
some Massachusetts Aleyrodes with descriptions of New 
Species". Psyche for April; -Notes on the Early 
Stages of Corylophodes marginicollis Lee", one plate. 
Entomological News for May ; -New Apoidea from 
Montana", with drawings ; "Notes on Life-history of 
someTingitidsof Genus Corythuca," one plate; and 
• • Green-house and Strawberry Aleyrodes, a study of 
the insects and their treatment." The last three arti- 
cles are as yet unpublished but will soon appear in the 
Can. Ent., Psyche, and as a special bulletin of the 
station respectively. 

Mr Morrill leaves Amherst Wednesday night for 
Washington. D. C from whence he will proceed to 
Texas where, under the employ of the government, 
he will devote his time to the study of the problems 
connected with the Cotton Boll Weevil. We wish 
Dr. Morrill great success in all his undertaking. 

72— E R Fiske, Address 234 West Chellen Ave., 
Germantown. Penn.. changed from 237 West Chetten 

Ave. 

Ex-72. -Frederick Ober. Fairmount Ave., Hack- 

nack. New Jersey. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



183 



Spring Clothes. 



Just the sorts that young men wilt ai>|>reciate. 
There's a collection ben that absolutely cannot 
be found elsewhere in West.TH New England. 
Will you come and sec it? 

HATS. FURNISHINGS. SHOES. 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 



Springfield, 



Mass. 




PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 

New York 

Central 

Lines 



DAILY SERVICE. 



THROUGH COACHES 

BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



SLEEP1NO CARS 

DINING CARS | 



EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 

TO AND FROM BOSTON VIA PALMER, 

as 1 (1LLOW8 : 



To ALBANY, 
To BUFFALO, 
To CHICAGO, 
To CINCINNATI, 
To DETROIT, 
To ST. LOUIS, 



Through the 
Famous . . . 



9 Trains 
8 Trains 
7 Trains 
3 Trains 
5 Trains 
3 Trains 



HKAI> DOWM. 

Ml A.M. 6.02 T.M. 
fcM " fi.45 " 

10.00 " B.M " 

lo.N> " s.M " 
11. so •* Ml " 



lv. Amherst 
nr. Palmer 
lv. 1'nlmer 
nr. Worcester 
ar. Boston 



bkap irr. 
ar. Ml a.m. «.*"> i'.M. 
lv.8.20 " 7.51 " 
ar.7.3fi " 7.36 " 
lv.6.25 " 6.10 " 
lv. 5.00 " 5.00 " 



Berkshire 
mils . . . 

AND THE 

Hlbanp GatetDap, 

Which is always Open. 



For( ,, rth cr 1 „ro,„,U„n. l l, n e,, M c,Hc..c.U„,,Uc k c,, e *.or.< l d reM ,A. 9 .I.AK S ON,O.P.A.,Bo. t „n,M.... 






78. — F. H. Osgood, Practicing veterinary surgeon, 
50 Village St., Boston, Mass. 

78. — John F. Hunt, buildjng superintendent. Ad- 
dress 6 Mt. Pleasant St., Winchester, Mass. 

•92.— A. T. Beals, florist. Springfield, Mass. Mr. 
Beals is at present traveling. 

'92. — Judson L. Field, traveling salesman. Change 
address from 21 1 Jackson Boulevard to 3017 Prairie 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

'92. — F. G. Stockbridge. Change of address from 
Harrison, N. Y. to Wyebrok, Penn. 

'92.— G. E. Taylor. R. F. D.. Shelburne. P. O.. 
Greenfield, Mass. 

'95. — The engagement is announced of Prof. E. A. 
White, of Storrs, Conn., to Miss C. A. Crittenden of 
Tyringham, Mass. Miss Crittenden was a successful 
teacher in the Amherst schools for several years and 
is well known to many of the townspeople. Prof. 
White was connected with this experiment station for 
two years following his graduation and later taught in 
the Texas Agricultural College. He now has charge 
of the department of botany, forestry and landscape 
architecture at the Conn. Agri'l. College. The wed- 
ding will take place at the home of the bride's parents 
in Tyringham. June 30th, 1903. and the young couple 
will be at home, Storrs, Conn., after Oct. 1st. 

Short course-'96. — J. A. Davis is in the employ of 
the city of Springfield as park superintendent. Ad- 
dress 70 Crystal Ave. 

Short course-'96. — E. W. Capen, M. D., is pursu- 
ing a course of post graduate study at the Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. Address 1821 Jeffer- 
son St., Baltimore. Md. 

'99, — b. H. Smith is pursuing an M. S. course at 
the Columbia University, Washington, D. C. 

•99. — w. E. Hinds at present employed by the 
Division of Entomology In investigating the Cotton 
Boll Weevel in the South, is at present staying at 
Victoria, Texas. 

'00.— Austin W. Morril will receive his Ph. D. de- 
gree this commencement from the Mass. Agricultural 
College. 

01. — P. C. Brooks, for some time in the Calumet 
works of the General Chemical Co.. Chicago, 111., has 
gone into business with his father in Brockton, Mass. 



TShe HEIR 

to the FARM ' 






V 



Will ni;iko tin- i>l'l farm p.iy 
If lie f.i 1 ins the furui in the 
model n way. 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

Uaught by Mail. 

A thorough urnl practical course, 

lllulol (In: cttlri I ill. II ia Of Will. I'. 

Brooks, I'll. D.. (Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural Collate). <'in ("iilscis 
Paged on "Brooks' Agriculture ;" ii 
treat* of soils, plants, tillage, drain- 
aiiu.in Igetlon. manures. f«i litigation, 
crop rotation and everything per- 
taining to money-making on the 
f .1 1 in. Text books (3 volumi 
pages. 300 Illustrations) froe i 
dents. Band f"r M> imyu bouk de- 
scribing couisu in full. 

Home 

Correspondence 

Schools, 

Springfield, Majj. 
otiior Cettnsi Boetaess, Mini-thand. 
Psnmaasblp, Typewriting. Normal 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGBR, 

200 Broadway, New York. 

Club and College 1'insaml Rings. 
Gold and Sliver Medals. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry. 



"UP TO THE MINUTE" 



IN 



MEN'S FINE SHOES. 

The Northampton Shoe Co., 



88 Main St., 



NoitTI! AMI-TON, MaHB 



184 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•01.— Charles Leslie Rice, formerly of Pittsfield. 
now of New York was married June 1 1 to Miss Ade- 
laide F. Crist of the latter city. 

'02.— H. E. Hodgkiss is intending to continue his 
studies at the Entomological Laboratory through the 
summer. 

•02.— Claude I. Lewis has recently accepted an 
appointment as instructor in Natural History and 
Curator of the Museum in Alfred University, Alfred, 

N. Y. 

•02.— Howard L. Knight terminates his engage- 
ment as instructor in Chemistry on September 1st, to 
take charge of Prof. Babson's work in English during 
the latter's leave of absence. 



Write a Note 

to Johnson 

when you want a book, a picture, Home stationery 
or anything *l»e worth baring. 




Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AND ART DEALER, 



3i:5-;si5 Main St., 



Springfield, Mass. 



It is said that twelve hundred students at the Ohio 
State University have conditions each semester and 
about two hundred of these leave for home. 



HENRY AI>iVM«!Si, 



A good opportunity for two young men 
to learn how to 

RAISE AND SELL VEGETABLES 

ho that each acre tilled may be made to 
return from #500 to §1500. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK. 



AMHERST, MASS 



Write or call on H. M. HOWARD, 

284 Fuller St., Wist Newton, Mas*. 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 



KANCT ANI> TOlLKT AUT1CI.KS, lMI'OKTKO AND 
DOMESTIC CHi AKS, CIUA15I TTKS, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND KRIAR IMl'K.S. FISHING TACKMS 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

MatRllicCaitrMges for Pistols, Si,oitiHU'»n.lS|»rli.gneMiin««. 
Sunday ami nlglit cull I rcspon.lo.l to at r.'si.lencf , *•* <Wor 
west of Chase's Block. 



' Hindi &• Nobli, Pnblisktrt, 9t W. tjtk St* 

If. Y.City, will send you any*/ these boots sub' 

\ jtci to approval. Enclost tk is advertisement . [ 

BoDMotiUtheOoltMn* • • • tj-f* 

Boon of the KMttra Collet^ • • \ 

Bonfi of the W»t«ro Coll«««« • • *> 

Mc« Bong* for Oloe OJata • ■ •• A 

Sm» Sons* for Mile Qautttte* • • * 

M*w Soon for Chnrth Qp»rHtW« • . 

gro Hoom Th»t WiU T»»« Prtoes • | 

fVeat for Krrry OocmIoo • » rf • 1 

i Minato Docl»m»tlon<i for Col I •>• MM ' !• 

B-MlDOto Rowing* for College Olrto • J 

How to Attr»cl tod Hold to A ndl"** • *■ 

l'^nn'i New ParlUmenUry M»nu»I . , 

Km Md Co««. (Complete I>eb«*«e) • _ J 
fcX2i-o»ertP^(0«tl S ^B-^.HB.T I 

iHiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiii 




l.o» 



PHOTOGRAPHIC, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty ol College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CAMPION b FISH. 



AOKNTS FOR 



MARKS ARNHEIM, 

Fine New York Tailoring. 

A NEW LOT OF 
FLANNEL SHIRTS. 

CAMPION & FISH, 



E. E. MILLETT, 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fine Watch-WOrk a Specialty. 



Stuind tiiior south of Post Ojjue. 



ICR CREAM, FRUIT, CONFEC- 
TIONERY. 



BOYDEIYS, 



177 MAIN ST., NORTHAMPTON, 



TELEPHONE 33-2. 



E. IKE. BOLLES, 

■QUI ACMMT FOR 

THE WORLD'S BEST. 




$3.50. 



OFTEN IMITATED. 
NEVER EQUALED. 



CON- 
SUMP- 
TION 
CURED 



8,000,000 lives are yearly! 
lost l>y consumption. It- 
is easily cured hv the 
Filipino Itemed v at home. 
Opium lialdt or use of j 
tobacco cured at home : 
no loss of time. 

Writt) to 

<;. wilson, 
l\ O. Box, 2:52, 

Palestine, Texas. 




HKADQUAltTKUN KOK 

FOOT BALL, BASE BALL, 
BICYCLE AND TENNIS SHOES. 

GEO. N. LUCIA, 

Ill.il. KK 11 

PICTURES, PICTURE FRAMES, 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, STATIONERY an.1 KANCT BOOM, 

hi Mnk,;!, ft Specialty of Picture framing .Jm 
229 Main Sthkbt, - Oir. Mkmokial iiai.l. 





STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

Genls' 

FINE READY-MADE SDITS. 

A LSO 

Custom. IVIoclo Clothliiig. 

Suits as low as 812. Trousers as low as $:i.. r »0. 
Overcoats as low as f 10. 



SANDERSON b THOMPSON 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Lovelly 

The Photographer, 

To the class of 1902 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



LANDSCAPE_GARDEN1NG. 

The subject of tttdfMH ^^^Pj^^Si The 

ti™.l extensively iu the Department of Horticulture. 1 ne 
lieDartraeit 1 prepared to furnish practicable plans for 
,W.2™ rouidf, f «ma. large estates and public places. 

Trees and shrubs for planting can also be supplied, and 
i„ T cSrcases r the actual workof putting out -the plan . 
making grades, arranging drainage, etc., can be uniier 



taken. 



Class ana' Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Camera, and Supplies In stock, and always fresh. 
AMHERST, MASS. 



iston 

Maine 

[RAILROAD 



• irl $ervice 



■ Betyveen * 

BOSTON-CHICAGO, 
ST.LOUIS, SIPAUL, 

MINNEAPOLIS ANDALLP^ITS 

WEST,NORTHWEST.SOUTHWEST. 

PULLMAN PARLOR OR SLEEPING CARS ON ALL 

THROUGH TRAINS. 
for tickets and information apply at any 
pi in ci pal tic hut offici- 

I)..I.Klaiidcr.s.GiNip&5ssiKT ADiBOSTfN 



DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE, 
MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

Telephone H4. 

IDEAL LUNCH 



AND 



POOL ROOMS, 



3 Cook's Block, 
up one flight. 



DWIGHT W. THURBER, Prop. 

Telephone 14-5. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 

Practical Plumber, 

STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 

A LARGE STOCK 0» 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, Ac. 
nOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

8TEAM a*d HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



PATRONIZE 

E. N. PARISEAU'S 




UNDER THE EXPRESS OFFICE. 



E. R. CLARK & CO., 

Latk M. N. Spbab. Est. 1849. 

STATIONERS, NEWSDEALERS. 

Embossed M.A.C. Stationery and riags, 
Note Books, Tablets, Stationery, Sundries.